More On Erinn Cosby's Drug Habit

Posted: October 03, 1989

Erinn Cosby, who left a Rhode Island drug rehabilitation facility nine days ago, said she began a cocaine habit four years ago but her parents had no inkling of it until she told them in a letter six months ago. At that time, her habit had reached $200 a day.

"People see Bill Cosby as a super dad," the comedian's 23-year-old daughter is quoted as saying in this week's National Enquirer. "But I'm proof that drug and alcohol tragedies can happen even in the most loving families."

The TV star is quoted as saying that he responded to her situation with ''tough love" and advised her to seek treatment. "We love her and want her to get better," Bill Cosby said. "But we have to take a very firm, very tough stand that forces her to realize that no one can fix things for her. She has to beat this on her own."

A Cosby spokesman confirmed the Enquirer's story and added that the comedian will have nothing more to say about the matter.

Erinn Cosby, now staying with a cousin in Boston, said she began drinking and smoking pot at a boarding school when she was 14.

APPROACH THE BENCH

The term Philadelphia lawyer and all that it means may be as outdated as New Jersey being "the Garden State." In its Oct. 16 issue, Forbes magazine lists the 50 highest-paid trial lawyers and the 50 highest-paid corporate lawyers. Richard Sprague, 64, is the only one carrying the Philly banner. He's 21st on the corporate list with an estimated 1988 income of $1.6 million. That's way off the pace set by No. 1 on the list, New York's Joseph Flom, 66, who pulled down $5 million. But they're all pikers compared to Houston's Joseph Dahr Jamail, who heads the trial lawyer list with a whopping $450 million. The second-place guy didn't make a tenth of that. Jamail, 63, was a big winner in last year's Texaco-Pennzoil case.

PITCHING PRODUCTS

Nolan Ryan, baseball's supreme strikeout pitcher, will appear with his son, Reese, 13, in a TV spot for Major League Baseball expected to debut this week during the playoffs. Reese plays his dad as a kid, perfecting his fastball by throwing against the side of a barn until the ball finally pierces a wooden plank. Then we see the old man showing them how on the Texas Rangers' home field. A representative for the ad agency that made the spot said that, after a summer of some discontent, baseball wanted to push a "continuity and tradition" theme.

Spuds MacKenzie, who appeared in only one Bud Light ad this year after Sen. Strom Thurmond, former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and others complained that the ugly party animal was enticing kids to drink, will resurface in a new ''Samurai Spuds" TV spot during the playoffs. Though MacKenzie will then disappear again until next spring, a Bud Light spokesman denies his scarcity is due to the criticism. "We thought we were burning him out as a character," he said.

SPORTS OF ALL SORTS

Basketball great Larry Bird married longtime squeeze Dinah Mattingly last weekend in Terre Haute, Ind. Talk about private: The only guests were Bird's business partner, Max Gibson, and his wife, Jackie.

Middleweight boxing champ Michael Nunn, his mother, Madies, and his bodyguard, Raymond Jones, were arrested and charged with assault Sunday for their involvement in a street brawl that included about 20 people in Davenport, Iowa. The handcuffed Nunn told police he was just trying to break up the fight. He kept repeating to police: "I'm cool. I'm cool."

MARKINGS

Is Oprah Winfrey regaining? One thing you didn't see or hear yesterday in the talk show host's weighty TV discussion with Roseanne Barr was an audience member shouting to Winfrey: "Are you still on your diet?" And her response: ''No. I eats food." Oh no!

Wayne Newton, who expected to pick up about $750,000 from the auction of 98 Arabian horses at his Las Vegas ranch last weekend, fell far short. The entertainer had to content himself with $471,625.

Imprisoned James Brown asked South Carolina prison officials to allow him to do a benefit for the victims of Hurricane Hugo. He was turned down. A prison spokesman noted: "When Mr. Brown finishes his sentence (of six years) there will be other causes to which he can donate his time and talent."

GOING HOME

The archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Runcie, ended his four-day mission to the Vatican yesterday by reviewing the love letters of England's King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn, whose romance ultimately led to the 1534 split between the Roman and Anglican churches. In a joint statement, Runcie and Pope John Paul II pledged to continue to work toward unifying the two religions while noting many obstacles, including the ordination of women as Anglican priests. During Runcie's Sunday sermon in Rome's Anglican church, three worshipers were hustled out after calling him "archdemon." The Vatican trip did not sell well back home. The British media say reunification subverts the British constitution under which Queen Elizabeth is the titular head of the Church of England.

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