Heinz Sight Not 20-20? Gop Boss 'Outraged' By Word Of Teresa's Jab At Santorum

Posted: October 29, 1994

The chairman of the Allegheny County Republican Party has some advice for Teresa Heinz: If you want to endorse Democrats, register as one.

Robert Cranmer, who said he was "outraged" by Heinz's recent remarks criticizing Republican Rick Santorum, sent her a nasty letter and a voter registration card yesterday.

"If she in fact agrees more with Bill Clinton and Harris Wofford and the extreme liberal position of the Democratic Party, then register as a Democrat and be one," Cranmer said in a telephone interview yesterday.

"Don't try to be a subversvie force in the Republican Party," he said.

Heinz, the widow of Republican Sen. John Heinz, had not seen Cranmer's letter but said this is a free country "where people can freely express their opinions and choose their parties."

"I'm very proud to be a moderate Republican and will remain so long after Mr. Cranmer has left his job," she said.

The controversy started when Heinz gave a speech in Pittsburgh Thursday night in which she said Santorum, who is trying to unseat the Democrat Wofford, was "short on public service and even shorter on accomplishments" and "the antithesis of John Heinz."

Heinz was angered by comments Santorum made recently that ridiculed President Clinton's national service program as a bunch of volunteers paid to sing "Kumbayah" around the campfire at night. Heinz serves on the board that oversees the program.

After the speech, she told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that she did not intend to endorse a Senate candidate and had no plans to vote for Santorum. She called Wofford "a dignified, noble human being."

"She's entitled to her opinion," said Santorum, who is locked in a dead heat with Wofford. "One vote is one vote. I'm going out there, and I think we have a very constructive message for Pennsylvania and this country and one I think that is going to do very well on Election Day."

Wofford said he liked what Heinz said about Santorum but did not elaborate.

Santorum also admitted to smoking pot while in college during a television appearance in Wilkes-Barre Thursday.

And he inhaled, he said yesterday.

"I think people have to know their politicians aren't perfect," he said. ''And if anyone runs for office and thinks what they did in their past is going to be a secret, they're crazy."

Wofford, who said he never smoked pot, didn't have much to say about Santorum's revelation.

"We're talking about the vital future of our country," he said. "That is not an issue related to whether we take action to help working families in Pennsylvania."

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