Inqlings: Del Frisco's serves up meaty role in a thriller

The Union Trust restaurant holds a private launch with local celebrities including (from left) Philadelphia Style magazine publisher John Colabelli and meteorologists Doug Kammerer of CBS3 and John Bolaris of Fox29. The party was last night; the steak house, at 717 Chestnut St., is scheduled to open to the public Friday.
The Union Trust restaurant holds a private launch with local celebrities including (from left) Philadelphia Style magazine publisher John Colabelli and meteorologists Doug Kammerer of CBS3 and John Bolaris of Fox29. The party was last night; the steak house, at 717 Chestnut St., is scheduled to open to the public Friday.
Posted: February 08, 2009

SWAT teams and sharpshooters took over a corner of 11th and Somerset Streets in North Philly for two days of drama last week. And this coming week, look out for the steak-out unit.

It's all for Law Abiding Citizen, the thriller being filmed in town with Jamie Foxx and Gerard Butler.

Christian Stolte (guard Keith Stolte in Prison Break) plays a man wanted for the murder of the wife and daughter of Butler's character. In scenes filmed Wednesday and Thursday, Stolte was holed up in a house on the 2800 block of North 11th Street that was ringed by cops, including detectives played by Colm Meaney (Star Trek: The Next Generation) and Michael Irby (Line of Fire, The Unit). Despite the dragnet, Stolte's character gets away.

Director F. Gary Gray and company will be at the George W. Hill Correctional Facility in Thornton this week, which is where the steak-out factors in. Del Frisco's, the new steak house at 15th and Chestnut Streets, will send food to be used in a prison scene with Foxx and Butler. Foxx plays a district attorney trying to butter up the incarcerated Butler with a Del Frisco's meal. It will be so branded, says Del Frisco's general manager Shang Skipper. He met the filmmakers while buying suits at Les Richards in Liberty Place, and they've been regulars.

Stop in the name of love

Two Lower Merion police officers will walk the aisle Saturday: Tami Gleockler, 28, is trading her blue uniform for a white wedding gown to marry Mike Rigby, 36, at Meredith Manor in Pottstown. Look at the calendar to see why Judge Kathleen Valentine of Ardmore District Court will officiate. The officers are frequent visitors to the judge's court when they are on official business. Valentine has presided over weddings every Valentine's Day since becoming a district judge eight years ago.

Culture clubs

Entrepreneur Hal Real, who developed World Cafe Live in University City in 2004, says he's waiting for the stars (as in $tar$) to align for a second World Cafe Live, at Wilmington's Queen Theater, closed since 1959. It would be part of the Buccini/Pollin Group's redevelopment of North Market Street. Real, who says the financing is close, says the goal is to get a shovel in the ground this spring, with opening 20 months hence. Besides a performance hall and a restaurant, the Wilmington WCL would include nonprofit and educational facilities and a separate event space.

Web 2.0 - or is that Web tutu-point-oh? Moving gracefully into new media, the Pennsylvania Ballet has launched a YouTube channel, and announced it Friday on its Twitter feed and Facebook page. It's at www.youtube.com/pennsylvaniaballet

The Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill has prevailed in its long Common Pleas Court zoning fight to build an addition. The museum, devoted to Philly artists and set up in a stone mansion, announced the plans in 2000 and a year later chose architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown to design the public auditorium, exhibition hall, museum store, and collection and archival support areas. Last month's court ruling coincided with the announcement of a donation of 19 sculptures from the collection of Walter Erlebacher.

On screen

Thumbs up for Bristol-born musician Don McCloskey and Berwyn-bred director Peter Rhoads, whose "Mr. Novocaine" won the Grand Jury Award for best music video last month at the Slamdance Film Festival for first-time directors. The low-budget video, which stars an Argentine finger actor (using three fingers and undersized props), can be seen on YouTube and at McCloskey's site, www.EnormousD.com

Arlen Faber - the shot-in-Philly romantic dramedy starring Jeff Daniels as a reclusive author and Lauren Graham as a single mom whose life collides with his - should see the light of movie theaters this summer. Last week, Wagner/Cuban's Magnolia Pictures bought the rights to the film, which was called The Dream of the Romans during production in the spring. It premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.

Media activity

CBS3 finally has its anchor office space firmed, now that Chris May has moved into Marc Howard's old digs, next to Susan Barnett's, who took Alycia Lane's place. May's office needed some rewiring. Beasley Reece's office needed no such work; its previous occupant was Larry Mendte.

On tonight's Larry Kane: Voice of Reason on the Comcast Network (9:30), Kane flashes back to the Beatles' arrival in the United States. Feb. 9, 1964, was the first of three consecutive appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Kane, a radio reporter in Miami, was the lone U.S. newsman to follow the Fab Four on the 1964 and '65 tours, and he has written two best sellers on the subject. Included tonight are clips of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's final film interview (May 1968), Lennon doing the weather on Channel 6 (May 1975), and chats with arranger Mark Hudson and historian Denny Somach. As for the Sullivan appearances, Kane recalls that the Beatles got $10,000 for each show.

Honorable menschen

Construction of the National Museum of American Jewish History's new home at Fifth and Market Streets is proceeding apace. It seems to be topped off. Perched on the steel structure are an American flag and a Christmas tree. Or, as PR/ad man David Neff wonders, is that a Hanukkah bush?


Contact columnist Michael Klein

 

at 215-854-5514 or mklein@phillynews.com.

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