Del. man among fatalities in Uganda bomb attacks

An undated photo provided by Invsibile Children shows Nate Henn who was killed in Uganda Sunday July 11, 2010. He was killed when simultaneous explosions tore through crowds watching the World Cup final at a rugby club and an Ethiopian restaurant. (AP Photo/Brandon Tauszik/ Invisibile Children)
An undated photo provided by Invsibile Children shows Nate Henn who was killed in Uganda Sunday July 11, 2010. He was killed when simultaneous explosions tore through crowds watching the World Cup final at a rugby club and an Ethiopian restaurant. (AP Photo/Brandon Tauszik/ Invisibile Children) (Lissa Atkins)
Posted: July 12, 2010

A Wilmington, Del., man is among those killed Sunday in a pair of bombings in Uganda that officials believe were carried out by Islamic extremists.

Nate Henn, 25, worked with Invisible Children, a San Diego-based organization that publicizes the plight of child soldiers in East Africa and helps former youth combatants.

On his Facebook page, Henn lists Wilmington as his hometown and said he was a 2007 graduate of the University of Delaware and a 2003 graduate of Concord High School.

Invisible Children said Henn was killed in a bomb blast at a rugby field in Kampala where people had gathered to watch the final match of the World Cup. That explosion and a second one at an Ethiopian restaurant in the Ugandan capital claimed at least 64 lives.

Ugandan officials said they suspected the bombings were the work of a Somali group liked to al-Qaeda and opposed to Uganda's participation in an African Union peacekeeping force in Mogadishu, Somalia's war ravaged cap.

The organization said Henn had worked for Invisible Children for about 18 months and "leaves behind a legacy of honor, integrity, and service."

"From traveling the United States without pay advocating for the freedom of abducted child soldiers in Joseph Kony's war, to raising thousands of dollars to put war-affected Ugandan students in school, Nate lived a life that demanded explanation," the organization said in a statement.

(Joseph Kony is the head of the Lord's Resistance Army, a group that abducts children for forces them to serve as combatants in a guerrilla war to establish a supposedly Christian theocracy in Uganda.)

Henn "sacrificed his comfort to live in the humble service of God and of a better world, and his is a life to be emulated," the statement said.

"Nate was not a glory-seeker and never sought the spotlight. He asked not to be made a hero of. But the life he lived inspires reflection and imitation."


Contact the Inquirer Online News Desk at online@phillynews.com

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