Which Chick-Fil-A freebie is the real deal?

Some on the nine breakfast entrees in the Chick-Fil-A giveaway Sept. 6 to 10.
Some on the nine breakfast entrees in the Chick-Fil-A giveaway Sept. 6 to 10.
Posted: September 06, 2011

Today through Saturday, Chick-Fil-A is giving away free breakfast entrees - while reservations last.

But beware: At least one fake deal is out there, gathering private info from unsuspecting suckers. The impostor offers a coupon, while the real deal uses online reservations.

Here's the genuine article: www.chick-fil-aforbreakfast.com. (A link also shows up on Chick-Fil-A's home page when it fully loads, but the link on the Facebook page wasn't working this morning.)

On this writer's computer, the page appeared with a list of local outlets. As of 9:15 a.m., about 519 reservations were left at the Aramingo store, 2301 E. Butler St., in Philadelphia, but 3,626 were still available at 400 Haddonfield Road in Cherry Hill, across from the mall. Others had from about 1,200 (Cheltenham) to 2,100 (Cherry Hill, near Route 70 in the Wegman's shopping center).

You have to choose not only a date, but a specific block of time and one of nine entrees, including sandwiches, breakfast burritos and multigrain oatmeal.

Chick-Fil-A requires some personal information, including email address, street address and birthday, but no cell number. Once you sign up, you're emailed an "invitation," which you'll need to print out and bring. "A photo ID may also be requested," the website warns.

Otherwise, don't be fooled. A web search for the deal can led to a website with "tophd.me" in the address. An offer at "grocerycouponsaving.com" just takes folks to the same "tophd" page.

In tiny type at the bottom of the page is this disclaimer:

"This site is not affiliated with or endorsed by Chick-fil-A."

If you enter your email and continue, you'll be asked for your street address and cell phone number. Then you'll be asked to verify your cell number. Almost immediately, you'll get texts for new contest offers. Online, the so-called coupon deal soon morphs into some confusing iPad pitch. "Free" makes it sound like a giveaway, but the whole thing smells fishy.

Didn't want to risk further testing to find out.


Contact staff writer Peter Mucha at 215-854-4342 or pmucha@phillynews.com.

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