‘Devastated’ Paterno says he’ll retire

Penn State football coach Joe Paterno arrives home Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011, in State College, Pa. Paterno has decided to retire at the end of the season, his long career brought down by his failure to do more about an allegation of child sex abuse against a former assistant. Paterno said in a statement Wednesday he is "absolutely devastated" by the developments in the case of Jerry Sandusky, a former defensive coordinator accused of molesting eight boys over 15 years. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Penn State football coach Joe Paterno arrives home Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011, in State College, Pa. Paterno has decided to retire at the end of the season, his long career brought down by his failure to do more about an allegation of child sex abuse against a former assistant. Paterno said in a statement Wednesday he is "absolutely devastated" by the developments in the case of Jerry Sandusky, a former defensive coordinator accused of molesting eight boys over 15 years. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) (AP)
Posted: November 09, 2011

Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno has decided to retire at end of the season.

In a statement released this morning, he expressed heartache over the scandal that included 40 child-sex-abuse charges against ex-defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky and coverup charges against two Penn State officials.

At one point, Paterno says, "I wish I had done more."

The resignation announcement begins:

"I am absolutely devastated by the developments in this case. I grieve for the children and their families, and I pray for their comfort and relief.

"I have come to work every day for the last 61 years with one clear goal in mind: To serve the best interests of this university and the young men who have been entrusted to my care. I have the same goal today.

"That's why I have decided to announce my retirement effective at the end of this season."

The possibility of the head football coach's departure has been speculated, even urged by some, since the scandal broke.

A grand jury presentment led to Sandusky's arrest on 40 charges of sexually abusing eight boys, including two as young as 7 or 8.

Two university officials - athletic director Tim Curley and senior vice president Gary Schultz - were charged with failing to report sex-abuse allegations and with perjury.

No legal charges were made against Paterno, but the grand jury presentment suggested he knew about a 2002 incident and, although he told Curley and Schultz, never alerted law enforcement.

In that incident, Sandusky allegedly sodomized a 10-year-old boy in the showers at the football complex, and it was witnessed by receivers coach Mike McQueary, who was a graduate assistant at the time.

McQueary told Paterno, who notified Curley and Schultz, who reportedly informed Penn State president Graham Spanier, whose tenure may also be near an end.

A change in Penn State's leadership is needed unless some better explanations emerge, said Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi.

Spanier's departure could happen today, a source close to the trustees told the Express-Times.

Here's the rest of Paterno's statement:

"At this moment the Board of Trustees should not spend a single minute discussing my status. They have far more important matters to address. I want to make this as easy for them as I possibly can.

"This is a tragedy. It is one of the great sorrows of my life. With the benefit of hindsight, I wish I had done more.

"My goals now are to keep my commitments to my players and staff and finish the season with dignity and determination. And then I will spend the rest of my life doing everything I can to help this University."


Contact staff writer Peter Mucha at 215-854-4342 or pmucha@phillynews.com.

comments powered by Disqus
|
|
|
|
|