Letters to the Editor

Newt Gingrich spoke at his caucus-night rally in Iowa on Tuesday while his wife, Callista, applauded.
Newt Gingrich spoke at his caucus-night rally in Iowa on Tuesday while his wife, Callista, applauded. (CHRIS CARLSON / Associated Press)
Posted: January 08, 2012

Gingrich's consistent hypocrisy

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has obviously ended his bogus pledge to run a positive campaign. In recent days, the now-desperate Gingrich, whose popularity is sagging, has stated that Mitt Romney "would buy the election if he could" and acknowledged that he considers Romney to be "a liar" over his stated relationship with political action committees that aired negative ads against Gingrich. In a bygone day, referring to one's political opponent as a "liar" could prompt a duel; today it is politics as usual.

I wish to recognize former House Speaker Gingrich for his consistency: his consistent hypocrisy, that is. It was Gingrich, after all, who condemned Bill Clinton for extramarital affairs while the unfaithful speaker was working on his third marriage.

Romney comes out of this smelling like a rose. He is seen as taking the high road, refusing to personally attack Gingrich and maintaining his sunny disposition. Those who engage in the tactics of Gingrich deserve what he is getting, an unceremonious plunge from grace.

Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

The problem with Santorum

Rick Santorum is an engaging guy with a pleasant personality, some significant political experience, and a good media delivery. So what is my problem with him?

Santorum's self-righteous indignation, his avowed piety, and his extreme social views all blur the line between our moral/religious lives and our political lives. If Santorum made it to the White House, we would be well on our way toward realizing his own personal vision of reestablishing a lily-white, puritanical, and Christian orientation to the country, all to the detriment of other points of view.

I think Santorum actually believes that he may be God's vessel to redirect the United States back to the land of milk, honey, and an evangelical far-far-right-wing political philosophy. We proud Pennsylvanians kicked him out of the Senate six years ago, and he will not get our help to send him anywhere now but home.

Ken Derow, Wallingford

The lie told about Santorum

Much of the media propagates a lie that Rick Santorum equated homosexuality with bestiality and pedophilia in an Associated Press interview years ago. Here is part of the actual text of what Santorum said: "Every society in the history of man has upheld the institution of marriage as a bond between a man and a woman. Why? Because society is based on one thing: that society is based on the future of the society. And that's what? Children. Monogamous relationships. In every society, the definition of marriage has not ever to my knowledge included homosexuality. That's not to pick on homosexuality. It's not, you know, man on child, man on dog, or whatever the case may be. It is one thing. And when you destroy that you have a dramatic impact on the quality ..."

Santorum specifically stated that homosexuality is not the same as these two other things. While I may not agree with Santorum on gay rights, the way to persuade Christians to support gay marriage is not to lie about what people actually say.

Daniel Pearson, Philadelphia

Iowa caucuses a show of power

How can anyone think the Iowa caucuses are reliable? About 110,000 people vote, but do not select delegates that bind them to a particular candidate at the national conventions. This is a straw poll that only removes the lower-ranking candidates, but seldom picks the general-election winner. It is just an expensive show of power.

Fay Gregg, Newtown Square

Money and politics

Tony Auth told a lot of truth in his political cartoon showing a huge Dumpster labeled "Citizens United Decision" pouring a deluge of filth over struggling people while an aloof Supreme Court justice stands by saying, "We approve this message" (Wednesday).

The excessive, disturbing, and negative influence of big money in politics has been apparent for years. Paid lobbyists, moneyed super-PACs, and now undisclosed vested interests and donors can call the shots, sway an election, and demand paybacks. One solution, besides thorough campaign-finance reform, might be to support and vote for those not beholden to such corrupting influence.

David W. Long, West Chester, davidwarrenlong@comcast.net

Paul rejects basic notion of equality

Tuesday's editorial-page cartoon by Steve Benson had Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul stating: "I am racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic; other than that, I am the perfect candidate."

The irony is that, until 1936, most African Americans voted Republican because of the party's antislavery history and its pro-civil rights stands after the Civil War. Pennsylvania Sen. Thaddeus Stevens led the way. He helped block reentry of Southern states into the Union until they ratified the equal-rights protections guaranteed in the 14th Amendment.

Is it seemly for a political party to accept as its standard bearer someone who proudly rejects the core American value of equality? The cartoonist has it right by drawing Paul in a trash can. That is where he belongs.

Philip Rosen, Philadelphia

Not so open-minded

The writer of the letter "Signs of intelligent life" (Wednesday) mocks the intelligence of the GOP presidential candidates, presuming that the country has made great gains thanks to the intelligence of Democrats such as President Obama, Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, Chris Dodd, Jon Corzine, and Barney Frank. The writer doesn't appear to have the open mind that leftist intellectuals all claim to have. Liberals and progressives tend to think more highly of themselves than others.

Connie Waterman, Narberth

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