The Week in Words: Strong numbers; jamming on the bus

This device, which is used to jam cellphones, is illegal. A SEPTA rider identified only as "Eric" admitted to using one.
This device, which is used to jam cellphones, is illegal. A SEPTA rider identified only as "Eric" admitted to using one. (NBC10)
Posted: March 11, 2012

"Overall, another very strong payroll report and there's every chance that March will bring more of the same."

- Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist with Capital Economics, after Friday's report that U.S. unemployment stayed

at 8.3 percent.

"It doesn't help to have shouting matches. We have to sit down and do our best to come up with a future for these refineries."

- U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) after a meeting with Sunoco Inc. chief executive officer Brian P. MacDonald over refinery closings.

"Consumer borrowing is back, fueled by a healthy interplay of rising demand for big-ticket items and relaxing credit standards. We appear to be in the early stages of a virtuous cycle, where credit easing facilitates more spending."

- Richard DeKaser, deputy chief economist at Parthenon Group L.L.C. in Boston, said Wednesday about a January economic report.

"It is possible that a limited number of homeowners may encounter unusual up-front costs when installing the more efficient furnaces . . . due to the uncommon physical characteristics of their homes," the organization said in a footnote."

- The Natural Resources Defense Council,

in downplaying in

court papers the negative effect of new standards

for high-efficiency furnaces.

"There's a lot less imbalance and a lot less uncertainty than there was three years ago."

- John Canally, investment strategist with LPL Financial Corp., on the economy.

"People in most of this country don't like to be told what they can and cannot put in their bodies."

- Bruce Bedrick,

chief executive of Kind Clinics, which sells marijuana-management and legal-compliance computer systems to medical-pot dispensaries.

"I guess I'm taking the law into my own hands, and quite frankly I'm proud of it."

- a SEPTA rider identified only as "Eric," who admitted to using an illegal jamming device to silence cellphones on the bus.


Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News.

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