TheWeekInWords: Something really neat; a footprint in the shale

Posted: April 15, 2012

“We have something really neat, and it fits the world right now.” — Ted Eckenhoff, of Eckenhoff Motorcycles of Cherry Hill, which sells Zero Motorcycles’ line of gas-free bikes.

“Google is a large company now so we’ll achieve more and do it faster if we approach life with the passion and the soul of a start-up. This has involved a lot of cleanup.”— Google Inc. CEO Larry Page, on the company’s improved performance for the latest quarter, including a 61 percent increase in net income.

“They’ve got to show some scalps. Anybody can file a case. It’s another thing to win it.”— Adam Pritchard, who previously served in the SEC’s Office of the General Counsel, on the stakes in the agency’s case against former Fannie Mae CEO Daniel H. Mudd.

“The type of patient who will benefit from this test are people who have symptoms of cognitive decline, such as memory loss. A physician can order the scan, and it will give them information about the presence, or absence, of amyloid plaques in the brain.”— Avid Radiopharmaceutical Inc.’s founder and chief executive officer, Daniel Skovronsky, 39, after the FDA approved Avid’s test to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease.

“There is a fight for market share occurring on multiple fronts — technology, patents, advertising. Microsoft, more so than others out there, has been its patent portfolio as a way to generate license fees. This should strengthen that.”— Colin Gillis, an analyst with BGC Financial who covers Microsoft Corp., after Microsoft bought a trove of patents held by AOL Corp. for more than $1 billion.

“We now have a critical mass and a strategic footprint in the Marcellus Shale.” — William H. Shea Jr., chief executive officer of Penn Virginia Resources Partners L.P. of Radnor, on his company’s acquisition of a gas pipeline company for $1 billion.

“I’ve tried very hard not to be part of the Facebook ecosystem. Now, I feel like the purchase has sucked me in. I’ll have to see how the privacy settings change to decide if I will leave it.”— Instagram user and fan Darwin Poblete, after Facebook bought the photo app’s start-up maker for $1 billion.

Compiled from The Inquirer and Associated Press.

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