No discipline for Solo after heated tweets

Posted: July 31, 2012

Hope Solo met with the coach and captains of the U.S. women's soccer team Sunday to discuss her latest outburst of candor, a Twitter rant that did no good for the image of the squad and distracted from preparations for the upcoming game against North Korea in the Olympic tournament.

Coach Pia Sundhage said Solo will not be disciplined for the series of tweets that criticized former U.S. player Brandi Chastain's commentary during the NBC broadcast of the Americans' 3-0 win over Colombia on Saturday.

"We had a conversation: If you look at the women's national team, what do you want [people] to see? What do you want them to hear?" Sundhage told reporters at the team hotel. "And that's where we do have a choice - as players, coaches, staff, the way we respond to certain things."

Solo rattled off four tweets following Saturday's game, upset over Chastain's criticisms of the team's defensive play.

Chastain, one of the most accomplished players in U.S. team history, refused to be drawn into the fray.

"I'm here to do my job, which is to be an honest and objective journalist at the Olympics, nothing more than that," said Chastain, who earned 192 caps from 1988 to 2004 and is best known for scoring the decisive penalty kick in the World Cup final in 1999.

Punch review

The disciplinary committee of world soccer's governing body is reviewing the hit to the face that left U.S. forward Abby Wambach with a black eye against Colombia.

Wambach said she was "sucker-punched" in the right eye by Lady Andrade in the 39th minute of Saturday's win. After the game, Wambach called for FIFA to take action, while Andrade called the play "an accident."

Plenty of room

Troops, teachers, and students are getting free tickets to fill prime seats that were empty at some Olympic venues on the first full day of competition.

Organizing chief Sebastian Coe answered widespread criticism Sunday by predicting that seats left unused, largely by Olympic and sports officials, will not be an issue as the games proceed.

"It is obvious, some of those seats are not being used in the early rounds," he said at a briefing.

The rows of empty seats at some Olympic venues have enraged sports fans in London who tried but failed to get Olympic tickets.

A Twitter account, @OlympicSeat, emerged on Sunday evening.

"I feel so empty," read one post, accompanied by an avatar of empty seats.

Twitter jam

The IOC said social media users helped cause problems for traditional broadcasters during the first big event of the London Olympics. Because of a glitch with GPS signals on Saturday during the men's cycling road race, broadcasters were unable to provide television viewers with much information about the location and timings of riders on the 155-mile course.

International Olympic Committee spokesman Mark Adams said the Olympic Broadcasting Services service was jammed by "hundreds of thousands" of people sending texts, pictures and updates to social networks such as Twitter and Facebook.

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