Summer cocktail recipes

Creator Michael Wizenberger adjusts the straws of Sampan's Blueberry Lemonade and Cucumber Margarita scorpion bowls. (Abi Reimold / Staff Photographer )
Creator Michael Wizenberger adjusts the straws of Sampan's Blueberry Lemonade and Cucumber Margarita scorpion bowls. (Abi Reimold / Staff Photographer )
Posted: August 09, 2012

The Prima Vera

Half of asparagus spear (including top)

¾ inch celery

¼ inch shaved fennel bulb

¼ inch cucumber, peeled, one slice

½ ounce fresh lemon juice

½ ounce Cointreau

2 ounces aquavit

Dash of agave

2 dashes of tarragon bitters, or muddle fresh tarragon around inside rim of glass

Muddle all vegetables in shaker, then add ice, shake, double strain into cocktail glass. Serve up with an orange twist. Serves 1.

Source: Daniel Miller, Vedge.

This cocktail is a spin on a French 75, with super-summer additions. The word "rosales" is the genus family from which the strawberry claims its ancestry, and a beautiful name for such an elegant cocktail.

Royal Rosales

1 ounce Beefeater Gin

1/4 ounce Poire Williams (pear brandy)

1/2 ounce strawberry syrup*

1/2 lemon, juiced

2 dashes Bittered Sling Orange & Juniper Bitters**

4 ounces sparkling wine

For the strawberry syrup:

1 cup washed, cored strawberries

1 cup white sugar

In a Boston Shaker, combine gin, Poire Williams, syrup, bitters and lemon, shake with ice. Double strain over a chilled champagne flute, and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a fancy lemon twist, long and curly. Serves 1.

*For the strawberry syrup:

Using a plastic vacuum-sealer bag, place strawberries with sugar. Suck all the air out, allowing steeping for 3 hours. Place bag in lukewarm water for the final hour, but do not boil. Open bag and drain the syrup from the strawberries. Use the strawberries for something else delicious, and place the syrup in a sanitized bottle or jar in the fridge for 10 days.

**Bittered Sling Extracts can be purchased through the craftybartender@gmail.com or kaleandnori.com.

Source: Lauren Mote, Tales of the Cocktail, kaleandnori.com.

Ghost of Mary

5 pounds vine-on tomatoes (remove vines)

1 red onion

3 long hot peppers

2 celery sticks

1 ounce lemon juice

1 ounce lime juice

1-inch piece of fresh horseradish

Salt and pepper to taste (1/2 to 1 teaspoon of each)

Puree all ingredients together and pour into cheesecloth 2 to 3 layers thick over a bowl. Hang for 6 to 8 hours, or overnight. Makes about one quart of liquid.

To serve: Rim cocktail class with a mix of equal parts salt, pepper, sugar and ginger powder.

Source: Bob Achilles, The Industry.

Raspberry Sidecar

1 ½ ounces brandy

½ ounce triple sec

½ Gran Marnier

½ ounce fresh lemon juice

5-6 raspberries, slightly muddled

Shake all ingredients over ice; strain and serve up in a martini or coup glass. Serves 1.

Source: Bob Achilles, The Industry.

This is a spin on the classic Red Snapper cocktail, circa 1941.

Appalachia Snapper

2 ounces Tanqueray Gin

2 ounces freshly pressed tomato water*

½ ounce lemon juice

½ ounce Appalachian herb syrup**

2 dashes Bittered Sling Grapefruit & Hops Bitters***

For tomato water:

1/2 super-ripe tomatoes (red, yellow, or purple)

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

For Appalachian herb simple syrup:

3 cups white sugar

2 sprigs flowering thyme

1 sprig of rosemary

3 sprigs of mint

3 bay laurel leaves

2 sprigs basil

2 ½ cups water

Combine all ingredients into a shaker; shake with ice.

Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass, using a fine-mesh tea strainer to catch the ice chips. Garnish with a lemon twist. Serves 1.

*For tomato water: Cut tomatoes into manageable wedges, and add to a blender with salt. Set up a bowl with a cheesecloth-strainer above it, and pour "tomato puree" into the cheesecloth. Allow to hang naturally and drain using gravity.

Reserve this liquid in an airtight container, dated, and keep in the refrigerator for up to 7 days. Use the tomato debris leftover in the cheesecloth for a gazpacho or soup base.

**For Appalachian herb simple syrup: Add herbs to sugar in a bowl. Using a muddler, push the herbs into the sugar, releasing their essential oils. It should look like a green sugar crumb when you're finished.

Add the sugar and herbs to cold water in a pot and bring to a "steeping" temperature — about 160 degrees on low/medium heat. Always stirring, ensure the sugar dissolves, and turn off the heat. Cover with a heat-safe lid, and allow to steep for 20 more minutes. Strain ingredients, and reserve this syrup in an airtight container, dated, and keep in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. This syrup can also be used for salad dressings and vinaigrettes.

***Bittered Sling Extracts, by Kale & Nori, are available through thecraftybartender@gmail.com.

Source: Lauren Mote, Tales of the Cocktail, kaleandnori.com.

The Second Labor

2 ounces tomato vermouth*

1 ounce London dry gin

For tomato vermouth:

1 medium sliced tomato

1 cup Dolin Dry vermouth

Stir in a mixing glass, with a pinch of salt. Serve in a cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon twist. Serves 1.

*For tomato vermouth: Cover in fridge and let steep overnight. Strain.

Source: Al Sostack, Franklin Mortgage.

Cucumber Margarita

9 ounces Jose Cuervo Silver Tequila

1 cup aloe vera juice (available at most grocery and health-food stores)

1 cup lemon juice

1 cup lime juice

1 cup simple syrup

1/2 cup orange juice

1/2 cucumber (sliced thin, on mandolin if possible)

Muddle almost all of the cucumber (reserve 2 pieces for garnish) with the simple syrup and lime juice. Combine the rest of the ingredients and shake well. Strain into a fishbowl with ice. Garnish with 2 slices of cucumber and fresh lime wedges. Serves 4.

Source: Michael Wirzberger, Sampan.

Blueberry Lemonade

9 ounces Absolut Citron

2 cups lemon juice

1 cup simple syrup

1 cup distilled water

Half-pint blueberries

Muddle almost all of the blueberries (reserve a few for garnish) with the lemon juice and simple syrup. Combine the rest of the ingredients and shake vigorously. Strain into a fishbowl with ice. Garnish with fresh blueberries and lemon wedges. Serves 4.

Source: Michael Wirzberger, Sampan.

|
|
|
|
|