Baseball Notes: Longtime exec Lee MacPhail dies

Lee MacPhail
Lee MacPhail
Posted: November 10, 2012

Lee MacPhail, 95, the longtime baseball executive who ruled in the celebrated Pine Tar case and later became part of the only father-son Hall of Fame pairing with his father, Larry, has died.

He was the oldest Hall of Famer, and he died Thursday night at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., the Hall said Friday.

In the second generation of one of baseball's most prominent families - his son, Andy, also was in the front office for several teams - MacPhail's most well-known moment in baseball came in 1983, when he was president of the American League. He upheld Kansas City's protest in the Pine Tar Game against the New York Yankees, restoring a ninth-inning home run to Royals slugger George Brett.

"Lee MacPhail was one of the great executives in baseball history and a Hall of Famer in every sense, both personally and professionally," commissioner Bud Selig said in a statement. "His hallmarks were dignity, common sense, and humility. He was not only a remarkable league executive, but was a true baseball man."

With MacPhail's death, Bobby Doerr at 94 becomes the oldest living Hall of Famer.

Born Leland Stanford MacPhail Jr. in Nashville on Oct. 25, 1917, he was general manager at minor-league Reading, went on to work for the Yankees in 1949 and spent a decade as farm director and player personnel director, with players he developed winning seven World Series titles.

He moved to the Baltimore Orioles as general manager in 1959 and six years later returned to New York to work for new baseball commissioner Spike Eckert. He returned to the Yankees as GM from 1967 to '73, and left after George Steinbrenner bought the team to become AL president.

Johnson nears new deal

The Washington Nationals and Davey Johnson were near a deal that would bring the manager back for 2013, general manager Mike Rizzo said.

Johnson, 69, who was under contract with the Nationals as a consultant for 2013 and '14, had said he would be patient as negotiations continued.


This article contains information from Inquirer wire services.

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