425 Million Dollar$

GETTY IMAGES Blood of the martyrShiite boys in New Delhi, India, strike themselves with sharpened blades attached to chains as part of a self-flagellation ritual marking the religious festival of Ashura, a mourning period that commemorates the seventh-century martyrdom of Prophet Muhammad's grandson Imam Hussein in the battle of Karbala.
GETTY IMAGES Blood of the martyrShiite boys in New Delhi, India, strike themselves with sharpened blades attached to chains as part of a self-flagellation ritual marking the religious festival of Ashura, a mourning period that commemorates the seventh-century martyrdom of Prophet Muhammad's grandson Imam Hussein in the battle of Karbala.
Posted: November 26, 2012

DES MOINES, IOWA - Lottery officials say that since nobody won the Powerball jackpot on Saturday, the top prize will now increase to about $425 million for the next drawing, the largest jackpot ever for the game.

Iowa Lottery spokeswoman Mary Neubauer said that the jackpot for Wednesday's drawing could go even higher than the estimated $425 million because sales pick up in the days before record drawings.

The previous top Powerball prize was $365 million, won in 2006 by ConAgra Foods Workers in Lincoln, Neb.

Egypt erupts over Morsi power grab

CAIRO - Supporters and opponents of Egypt's president on Sunday grew more entrenched in their potentially destabilizing battle over the Islamist leader's move to assume near-absolute powers, with neither side appearing willing to back down as the stock market plunged amid the fresh turmoil.

The standoff poses one of the hardest tests for the nation's liberal and secular opposition since Hosni Mubarak's ouster nearly two years ago. Failure to sustain protests and eventually force Mohammed Morsi to loosen control could consign it to long-term irrelevance.

Clashes between the two sides spilled onto the streets for a third day since the president issued edicts that make him immune to oversight of any kind, including that of the courts. A teenager was killed and at least 40 people were wounded when a group of anti-Morsi protesters tried to storm the local offices of the political arm of the president's Muslim Brotherhood in the Nile Delta city of Damanhoor, according to security officials.

McCain doesn't fry Rice

WASHINGTON - Republican opposition to U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice as the next Secretary of State began to crack Sunday as Sen. John McCain said that she was "not the problem" in the White House's handling of the Sept. 11 attack in Libya and suggested that he could be persuaded to swing behind her possible nomination.

McCain's remarks were in contrast to his previous stance that Rice wasn't qualified to replace Hillary Rodham Clinton, who is expected to step down soon as the top U.S. diplomat, and that he would do "whatever is necessary" to block Rice's possible nomination.

Rice is widely seen as Obama's first choice for the job as Secretary of State.

Moderately challenged

WASHINGTON - When the next Congress cranks up in January, there will be more women, many new faces and 11 fewer tea party-backed House Republicans from the class of 2010 who sought a second term.

Overriding those changes, though, is a thinning of centrist veterans in both parties. Among those leaving are some of the Senate's most pragmatic lawmakers, nearly half the House's centrist Blue Dog Democrats and several moderate House Republicans.

That could leave the parties more polarized even as President Obama and congressional leaders talk up the cooperation needed to tackle complex, vexing problems such as curbing deficits, revamping tax laws and culling savings from Medicare and other costly, popular programs.

Bounce. Ouch.

CHICAGO - They may be a big hit at kids' birthday parties, but inflatable bounce houses can be dangerous, a nationwide study found. Kids often crowd into bounce houses, and jumping up and down can send other children flying into the air, too.

The numbers suggest that 30 U.S. children a day are treated in emergency rooms for broken bones, sprains, cuts and concussions from bounce-house accidents. Most involve children falling inside or out of the inflated playthings, and many children get hurt when they collide with other bouncing kids.

- Daily News wire services

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