Ad company strips nude club's ads from NJ rest stops

An Atlantic City strip club is upset that it can't keep clients abreast of its activities after its brochures were removed from racks at rest stops along two major highways in New Jersey.
An Atlantic City strip club is upset that it can't keep clients abreast of its activities after its brochures were removed from racks at rest stops along two major highways in New Jersey.
Posted: January 11, 2013

AN ATLANTIC CITY strip-club owner says that he paid a lot of money to have his brochures placed inside key rest stops along the A.C. Expressway and the Garden State Parkway but that a management company took them out without explanation.

The brochures for Bare Exposure were placed alongside ads for less-titillating attractions such as amusement parks and museums. The brochures included phrases like "beautiful naked girls" and "all nude couch dances" but featured only a pretty face and full set of lips, the club's owner said.

"There's nothing obscene about it," said Anthony Ariemma, who pays about $5,000 a year for the service.

Ariemma and his attorney, Michael Dailey, have filed suit in federal court contending that stripping Bare Exposure's brochures from the rest-stop racks violates the First Amendment.

Named as defendants are HMS Host, a Maryland company that operates the public rest stops, the South Jersey Transportation Authority, which owns the rest stops on the expressway, and the New Jersey Turnpike Authority, which owns the stops on the parkway.

Ariemma said the problem began in the fall, when he created a new brochure for the Pacific Avenue club. It was a little more risque than the current ad, he admits, but nothing worse than you'd see in a Victoria's Secret ad.

"There wasn't any nudity, just two girls on the front part of the brochure," he said. "One looked they were going to kiss the other girl."

HMS Host and the two other defendants said "no" to the new ad, Ariemma said, and then said they would be removing the current Bare Exposure ads by Tuesday. Ariemma says he checked multiple rest stops, and the brochures already have been removed.

Dailey claims the removal violated the First Amendment because the rest stops are public buildings on public roads. HMS Host did not return requests for comment, and spokesmen for the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and South Jersey Transportation Authority declined to comment.


On Twitter: @JasonNark

comments powered by Disqus
|
|
|
|
|