In the Nation

Mark Sullivan joined the Secret Service in 1983 and became director in 2006. He will leave this month.
Mark Sullivan joined the Secret Service in 1983 and became director in 2006. He will leave this month. (AP)
Posted: February 02, 2013

Secret Service chief leaving

WASHINGTON - Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan is retiring after 30 years with the agency. The retirement is effective Feb. 22, the agency said. His replacement has not been announced.

Sullivan joined the Secret Service in 1983 after three years as a special agent in the Inspector General's Office at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He was appointed director in 2006.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano thanked Sullivan for his service in a statement Friday. "His commitment to keeping our country and its top officials safe is unparalleled and his devotion to the mission of the Secret Service and Department of Homeland Security has been unwavering," she said. - AP

Banking pick faces a fight

WASHINGTON - Renewing a three-year-old fight over bank oversight, Senate Republicans said Friday they will oppose President Obama's nominee to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau unless the office created after the 2008 Wall Street financial meltdown is significantly changed.

Obama has renominated current director Richard Cordray, who had been named in a recess appointment last year.

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell and 42 other GOP senators sent a letter Friday to Obama saying the consumer office has little accountability to Congress and wields too much regulatory authority. They said they would oppose any nominee, no matter his or her party affiliation.

Cordray faced the same opposition when Obama nominated him for the job in 2011. His Jan. 4, 2012, recess appointment is now under court challenge. - AP

Brown won't run for Senate

Former Sen. Scott Brown announced Friday that he will not run in the special election for Democrat John Kerry's Senate seat. Kerry this week was confirmed as secretary of state. Brown's decision means the Massachusetts seat is likely to remain Democratic.

Brown, a Republican, said in a statement that he wasn't sure another campaign "and the prospect of returning to a Congress even more partisan than the one I left, was really the best way for me to continue in public service." - Washington Post

Elsewhere:

A woman was killed and three people wounded Friday afternoon in a drive-by shooting in Phoenix, police said. A vehicle with four men inside pulled up to a house and someone fired multiple rounds, police said. One of the injured was in critical condition; the other two had non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

Twelve researchers and 11 inventors have received the nation's top award for invention and discovery. President Obama bestowed the national medals of science and of technology and innovation Friday in a White House ceremony.

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