Letters: Daily News helps her get answers

SEPTA rep gives reader a call

Posted: February 04, 2013

I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News, for getting matters addressed.

Maryann Zindell

Philadelphia

Take his word for it

Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29).

Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment. I could not have said it any better.

Just want to add that President Obama's policies are clearly socialist in nature. I won't bore anyone with the details. Those that understand government will agree. Those that disagree are clueless.

R. DiGiacomo

Philadelphia

Game over - move on

Georgia Makiver (letter, Jan. 30), I'm assuming you're a Republican, right-wing or tea party. Whatever . . .

Georgia, do you realize all the twisting of facts, and the constant disrespect of our president by the Republicans? Pulling out of all the stops to degrade him and the underhandedness of trying to steal the election. When are you going to realize you lost? Our president is your president: Barack Obama.

Get used to it. Do you have nothing else to do but dig up this "birthers" garbage again? What is your point? Give it up!

Jim Shannon

Haverford

Doggone right, Stu

Stu, you have hit the nail right on the head. ("Dog shaming . . . people-shaming," Bykofsky, Jan. 29.) Americans have lost any sense of shame for anything they might do or say. Nothing is out of bounds. This reflects poorly on the "me first" generation, which taught their children that they could do anything they wanted without regard to other people's feelings as long as it worked for them. Until this attitude changes, America will not recover its place as the greatest country in the world.

Joe Orenstein

Bustleton

The pictures accompanying your article were hilarious! I cut them out and every time I see them, I still laugh.

I'm with you on the idea of shaming people, but I'm not sure it's still possible. If I had money, I'd publish a paper that puts the news in perspective. For instance, a headline might read, "Another Idiot Throws His Life Away Over Insult," or maybe "Boys Incapable of Rational Thinking Assault Homeless People for Fun," or "Another Lazy Jackass Takes Advantage of Elderly Neighbor." I certainly wouldn't waste space on accounts of a criminal's difficult childhood. Millions of people have rough lives and manage to live without committing crimes against others.

At some point, one is expected to have matured sufficiently to know right from wrong. If you can teach a tot not to bite or hit, I'm pretty sure you can also teach him not to assault, cut, stab, shoot or otherwise maim other people.

Carrie Deitzel

Lansdowne

Closings vs. pensions

One has to wonder how the Daily News and politicians come to terms with school closings and teacher pensions.

On one hand, the school closings are a necessity because the district is looking at a potentially $1 billion deficit over the next five years. Painful to the kids and families affected but necessary. (Editorial, Jan 30.)

On the other hand, the state pension program is looking at a $44 billion long-term liability costing taxpayers $511 million in the next budget. (John Baer column, Jan. 30.)

Since one is a necessity and going to be fought by parents and the other is grossly unsustainable and will be fought by lawyers, my question is: Why are the closings OK but pension reform is not?

City Democrats get a pass for closing half-empty schools, and state Republicans end up losing elections for trying to facilitate reforms. The only loss is to the taxpayer, who has to fund both.

Both are sorely needed, but politicians better figure it out quickly because everyone is broke.

Dan Dvorak

Phoenixville

By hook, by crook?

Re: Traffic Court ( Daily News, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1).

We all know what the "oldest profession" is. Could the second oldest be a traffic court judge fixing tickets? do the feds really think they are going to finally clean up traffic court with all these indictments?

Mayer Krain

Philadelphia

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