Raptors rookie rules above rim

Terrence Ross used a ball boy as an obstacle on his final dunk in the all-star competition Saturday. He earned 58 percent of the fans' votes in the championship round.
Terrence Ross used a ball boy as an obstacle on his final dunk in the all-star competition Saturday. He earned 58 percent of the fans' votes in the championship round. (Getty)
Posted: February 18, 2013

Terrence Ross had to settle his nerves at the start of the all-star dunk contest Saturday night in Houston. By the end, he was calming down a ball boy he needed as a prop for his winning slam.

The 6-foot-6 Toronto rookie leapfrogged Michael Costolo, 9, the son of Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, whipped the ball between his legs, and hammered home a one-handed dunk to beat defending champion Jeremy Evans.

"I never told him I was going to go through the legs," Ross said. "He was kind of nervous. When I first grabbed him, he said, 'You're not going to hit me, right?' "

Ross seemed to be unsure of himself in the beginning, botching his first three dunk attempts in the first round.

But Ross earned 58 percent of the fans' votes in the championship round, outdoing Evans' prop-filled display. Evans leaped over a painted portrait of himself and former Jazz giant Mark Eaton, who sat on a box and held up the ball for Evans to swipe on his way to the rim.

Kenneth Faried, James White, 2007 dunk champion Gerald Green, and Eric Bledsoe also were in the field.

Stern washes hands

Commissioner David Stern believes that Sacramento has a chance to keep the Kings but that is ultimately up to the team's owners. The Maloof family has an agreement in place to sell the Kings to a group that will move the team to Seattle and rename it. Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, however, has said a counteroffer to keep the team in Sacramento is being put together.

Stern said he does not have a vote, so where the Kings wind up is not in his hands. "The owners are going to have a tough issue to decide," he said.

Hunter fires back

Billy Hunter, who was ousted Saturday as executive director of the NBA Players Association in a unanimous vote by player representatives, may be gearing up for potential legal action against the union. Hunter's lawyers said he has not been given due process as he was not invited to the players' meeting. Hunter's attorneys reportedly appear ready to sue the union to honor the more than $10 million that Hunter is still owed on his contract with the NBAPA, according to several media reports.

- Associated Press

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