Lehigh Valley games begin - on field and in restrooms

As a man approaches one of the $4,000 urinals at Coca-Cola Park in Allentown, the video console goes into gaming mode. Users receive a score.
As a man approaches one of the $4,000 urinals at Coca-Cola Park in Allentown, the video console goes into gaming mode. Users receive a score. (MARC NARDUCCI / Staff)
Posted: April 04, 2013

ALLENTOWN - The Lehigh Valley IronPigs are truly No. 1 when it comes to the adventurous new world of urinal gaming.

The IronPigs have created a video game that has what they call the "only truly hands-free urinal game controller."

It doesn't take much to be a whiz at this game, which is featured in the men's restrooms at Coca-Cola Park.

The new game likely won't hurt the sales of beverages, since the extra fluids will give the participants staying power.

"These games are sure to make a huge splash," quipped IronPigs general manager Kurt Landes, who has labeled them "The X-Stream Games."

Never has a trip to the men's room been more anticipated.

Landes talked about the gimmick before Tuesday's exhibition game between the triple-A IronPigs and the double-A Reading Fightin Phils. He said there are four of these video urinals in the ballpark. Each cost $4,000.

When a user approaches the urinal, the video console flips into gaming mode, using patented technology that detects both the player's presence and stream. Algorithms allow a user to engage with the screen by aiming in different directions to test his agility and knowledge.

Upon completion, users receive their score and a code to enter. They can view their position on a leader board or check the website to see how they stack up with the rest of that night's competition. High scores will be displayed across various video boards at the park.

This isn't all fun and games, the IronPigs say, because there is an educational message in this project.

The video urinals are presented exclusively by the Lehigh Valley Health Network. Included on the video screens are reminders to men about the importance of prostate health, urging those who have not been screened for prostate cancer to do so.

According to the American Cancer Society, 250,000 men in the United States are diagnosed each year with prostate cancer and 30,000 will die.

In addition to the video urinals, there are advertising messages about prostate cancer on the mirrors.

"We think it's a great combination of fan entertainment and interaction," Landes said. "There is also a great educational component to it."


Contact Marc Narducci at mnarducci@phillynews.com. Follow @sjnard on Twitter.

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