Andrea: Flood watch in effect

In this Wednesday, June 5, 2013 GOES satellite photo provided by NASA/NOAA, Andrea, the first named storm of the Atlantic season, forms over the Gulf of Mexico. The tropical storm is likely to bring wet weather to parts of Florida's west coast by the end of the week. (AP Photo/NASA/NOAA)
In this Wednesday, June 5, 2013 GOES satellite photo provided by NASA/NOAA, Andrea, the first named storm of the Atlantic season, forms over the Gulf of Mexico. The tropical storm is likely to bring wet weather to parts of Florida's west coast by the end of the week. (AP Photo/NASA/NOAA)
Posted: June 08, 2013

The juicy remnants of what is now Tropical Storm Andrea, now about to make landfall on the west coast of Florida, could douse the region with the heaviest rains since Oct. 29.  That was the date Sandy landed in New Jersey, and while this storm won't be remotely as dangerous as Sandy, forecasters say it has the potential to wring out up to 3 inches of rain across the entire region - and perhaps 5 inches in isolated areas. Flash-flood watches are in effect from late tonight through late Friday night.

The National Weather Service says the best chance of hefty downpours would occur early Friday and during the early evening.

A coastal tropical-storm warning is in effect as far north as the Maryland-Delaware border.

The heaviest rains are expected to the east of the I-95 corridor, but it appears that Philadelphia and all the neighboring counties are going to get rainfall amounts that they haven't seen in quite awhile.

During February, March, April, and May, less than 2.5 inches of rain was measured at Philadelphia International Airport for each of those entire months.

Major river flooding would be unlikely, but tropical systems are notoriously volatile. Two of the most-damaging June rainstorms on record were associated with tropical leftovers - namely, Agnes, in 1972, and Allison, in 2001.

One factor arguing against significant flooding is that Andrea - and whatever is left of it - should be moving quickly, scooting toward the Carolina coast and losing its tropical-storm characteristics later tomorrow.

Nevertheless, the forecast calls for the system, expected to approach the Delmarva coast early Saturday, to maintain tropical-storm force winds, up to 45 m.p.h.


Contact Anthony R. Wood at 610-313-8210 or twood@phillynews.com.

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