Brits bask in winning the U.S. Open

Jacklin
Jacklin
Posted: June 19, 2013

THEY'RE FEELING pretty good about themselves over in England - and understandably so. They sent young Justin Rose to Ardmore, Pennsylvania, right in the backyard where they lost their American Colonies 250 years ago, and he came back a United States Open champion.

The London Sun trumpeted it with the headline "It's Just Pa-fect."

It was a wonderful day for the English, who celebrated a U.S. Open win by one of their countrymen for the first time in 43 years.

"He finished like a true champion," Tony Jacklin told BBC Radio 5. "You have to stay in the moment, which sounds very easy but when the stakes are high it's very hard."

Jacklin, in 1970, was the last English player to win the U.S. Open. By extension, he was the defending champion when Merion hosted the U.S. Open the following year. Jacklin was plus-12 after two rounds and missed the cut.

"Merion was the great examination it was supposed to be," Jacklin told BBC radio. "It was fantastic."

More from 1970

Jacklin won his U.S. Open at Hazeltine (Minn.), a course that had only been opened for 8 years and one that came under heavy criticism.

Dave Hill, who finished second, was fined $150 when he said Hazeltine needed "only 80 acres of corn and a few cows to be a good farm." Fans greeted him with moos instead of boos.

Because of high winds, Arnold Palmer opened with a 79, Gary Player an 80 and Jack Nicklaus an 81. They all made the cut, but they also each earned less than $1,000 for the weekend.

Jacklin thanked PGA rivals Tom Weiskopf and Bert Yancey for encouragement before the final round. Wesikopf even left Jacklin a message.

"The note said [simply] 'Tempo!'," Jacklin said. "It reminded me to slow down my swing."

Yancey, who had roots in Radnor, tied for 22nd. Weiskopf tied for 30th.

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