Apptitude: To mark the day, apps for all manner of labor

Job-seeker Michael Grosberg reviews his paperwork and resumé at a job fair in New York. For those on a job hunt, apps can be both handy and to be avoided.
Job-seeker Michael Grosberg reviews his paperwork and resumé at a job fair in New York. For those on a job hunt, apps can be both handy and to be avoided. (CRAIG WARGA / Bloomberg News)
Posted: August 30, 2013

With an eye on Labor Day, here's a look at smartphone applications that deal with labor issues such as getting a job, hiring a laborer, and, of course, clocking labor pains.

Two free job apps, Job Search by Indeed.com and Monster.com Jobs by Monster Worldwide, provide intuitive searching from their opening screens, where you type in keywords and a location. Both provide many other services, such as resumé posting, links to apply for jobs, and notifications for registered users.

Stay away from Day Job Labor, by Dennis Tucker. This app purports to pull job listings for temporary labor work from Craigslist. It is $1.99 for iPhone. The app crashed each and every time I attempted to launch it over several days.

Better to look for laboring or other jobs - or advertise for laborers - on Craigslist using one of many Craigslist-focused apps that browse all listings, not just those for jobs.

One of the best is cPRO+, a Craigslist client from Escargot Studios L.L.C. (the "+" indicates the paid version, at $1.99 for Android and Apple, but there's also a free version). I used it to quickly pull up posts for laborers needed in the Philadelphia area for painting, construction, mold remediation, landscaping, and manufacturing. The app can be set to notify you of new listings. And you also can use it to shop or to sell stuff.

Act like an economist and study the Keynesian view of labor by picking up The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, a 1939 text by John Maynard Keynes, one of the most influential and controversial economists of the last 100 years. The book comes as a $1.99 app for iPhone, and there is a similar 99-cent version for Android devices.

Full Term - Labor Contraction Timer, free for iPhone from Mustansir Golawala, who says, in describing the app, that he created it for use by his wife. Tap "Start" and "Stop" as labor contractions come and go. You can just stick to timing, or tap "Detail" to record the intensity of a contraction or make notes about it.

To get information to a health professional, tap the e-mail icon to send your contraction list, including start and end times with durations, frequency, and intensity compiled in a chart. Review testimonials swear the app is "perfect for panicked dads" and "gave me something to focus on during contractions."


Contact Reid Kanaley at rkanaley@phillynews.com, 215-854-5114, or @ReidKan.

comments powered by Disqus
|
|
|
|
|