Sideshow: The Emmy for squirming goes to . . .

Samuel L. Jackson. "We don't all look alike," he told an L.A. interviewer.
Samuel L. Jackson. "We don't all look alike," he told an L.A. interviewer.
Posted: February 13, 2014

The Emmy for squirming goes to . . .

Ever see a guy instantly realize he has said the wrong thing? Well, you can see it on the viral video of entertainment reporter Sam Rubin, from TV station KTLA in Los Angeles, confusing actors Samuel L. Jackson and Laurence Fishburne during an interview on Monday. Rubin began backpedaling almost as soon as he realized his mistake and tried to get back to the subject of the interview, Jackson's film RoboCop, but Jackson wasn't letting him off the hook.

It started when Rubin asked the actor about reaction to his Super Bowl commercial. "What Super Bowl commercial?" Jackson said. Oops. That was Fishburne, doing a commercial for Kia. "We may be all black and famous, but we don't all look alike," Jackson said.

Rubin apologized on the station's website, writing: "I very much apologize to Samuel L. Jackson and anyone else who was offended for what was a very amateur mistake."

Anti-loving cup

We at "SideShow" don't know where British critic A.A. Gill will display his new trophy, but we think on top of the toilet tank might be a good place.

Gill is this year's winner of Britain's Hatchet Job award, given for "the angriest, funniest, most trenchant" book review published in a newspaper or magazine. Gill's prize piece was a crusty critique of the best-selling memoir by formers Smiths front man  Morrissey. Writing in the Sunday Times newspaper, Gill said Autobiography was "utterly devoid of insight, warmth, wisdom or likability." British readers obviously disagreed. Autobiography led the British best-seller lists when it was published last year.

According to the Omnivore, the literary website that established the Hatchet Job award in 2011, the honor is intended to encourage reviewers to be fearless.

Back to Hugh

Hugh Jackman, who hosted the Tony Awards from 2003 to 2005, will return for this year's ceremony on June 8 at Radio City Music Hall. He succeeds Neil Patrick Harris, who did his fourth turn as host of the prizefest last year, and who is a nominee for his lead role in Hedwig and the Angry Inch.


Compiled by the Inquirer staff.

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