Kensington store owner 'very scared' after shooting

Police are looking to identify the man shown in this surveillance footage who pulled a gun yesterday on three men, shooting one, inside the Good Good Chinese restaurant in Kensington.
Police are looking to identify the man shown in this surveillance footage who pulled a gun yesterday on three men, shooting one, inside the Good Good Chinese restaurant in Kensington.
Posted: April 10, 2014

VICKY LIN and her family have operated the Good Good Chinese restaurant in Kensington for 11 years.

And if they have their way, there won't be a 12th.

"We are very scared," Lin - who talked with a reporter with the help of her English-speaking son - said yesterday inside her business. "We've wanted to sell this store for many years, and now more than ever."

Their change of heart came early yesterday, when a 50-year-old man was shot twice while defending himself and two friends from an armed man looking to rob them.

That victim, whom a police source identified as Ali Mohammed, remained in critical condition last night at Temple University Hospital, where he underwent surgery yesterday for two gunshot wounds to his abdomen.

Surveillance footage from the store's cameras, reviewed by the Daily News, paints a clear picture of what happened inside Good Good, at Cambria and Rosehill streets, in the moments before the shooting:

Just before 2 a.m., Mohammed and two of his friends enter the store to pick up an order they had placed earlier.

Lin, who normally closes her restaurant at midnight, said she unlocked the door for the three men because they're neighborhood residents and loyal customers.

As the trio wait for their food, a fourth man enters the store, hawking CDs from a black case. He's joined shortly after by a fifth man, who shoos the wannabe salesman away.

After he leaves, all hell breaks loose.

The fifth man pulls a handgun from his waistband, but drops what appears to be a live round before he can free the weapon. As he stoops to pick it up, the other three men spring into action, wrestling the gunman to the floor.

During the skirmish, the gun goes off twice, hitting Mohammed both times. Despite his injuries, he helps his friends snatch the weapon away from the man, who then flees the scene with the help of a woman.

Outside the store, the two climbed into a waiting vehicle, which police believe to be a Dodge Durango, and sped away, heading north on Rosehill Street, Chief Inspector Scott Small said.

When officers arrived at the scene, they took Mohammed to Temple hospital and the other customers in for questioning at East Detectives Division.

From those interviews, Small said, investigators determined the gunman's goal was to rob the three customers, and not the store itself.

His weapon, which a police source identified as a .45-caliber Desert Eagle handgun, was recovered at the scene, along with two shell casings and the round apparently dropped by the gunman as he fumbled with his pistol.

Police were still searching last night for the shooter, described as a man in his late 20s or early 30s, and his female accomplice, believed to be in her early 20s. The victims told investigators that they had never seen either person before yesterday's fight, Small said.

Neither had Vicky Lin, a longtime Philadelphian now afraid to keep her business open past sunset.

"This neighborhood has been bad for years," she said. "We can't stay here."

- Staff writer Morgan Zalot

contributed to this report


On Twitter: @Vellastrations

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