Obama's order ends SEPTA strike

Posted: June 17, 2014

SEPTA's Regional Rail lines are once again rolling, thanks to a little help from the White House.

The strike that shuttered the transit authority's rail lines ended yesterday after a single day, thanks to an executive order signed by President Obama at the request of Gov. Corbett.

In light of that, all Regional Rail workers showed up for their morning shifts yesterday, and the lines were officially back in action for the 60,000 people they serve daily, SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.

Late Saturday, Obama called for a presidential emergency board, which will hold hearings to help mediate the dispute over pay raises between SEPTA and two of its unions, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, Williams said yesterday.

Under federal law, the more than 400 workers those unions represent must return to work while the board conducts its work, a process that lasts 240 days.

The board's first hearings will be held the week of June 23, and its members will issue their recommendation to Obama by July 14, Williams said.


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