Featured Articles from Philly.com

ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The exhibition of sculpture by the late Henry Mitchell that fills both the Paley and Levy Galleries at Moore College of Art and Design pays homage to an artist whose creations adorn a number of public spaces in the city. Mitchell's pieces, like the impala fountain at the zoo and the cat fountain at the Betsy Ross House, are highly visible; Mitchell is less well known. This exhibition of 59 pieces, the majority of them maquettes for public commissions, seeks to offer Mitchell some belated recognition for enlivening the city's public landscape.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
When the pop history of Philadelphia is written, Grady and Hurst should get a very long chapter. It seems like they've been around since Marconi invented the radio. Their longevity, popularity and recognizability in Philadelphia is unmatched. Joe Grady, 76, who began a radio career in 1935 and Ed Hurst, 67, who was on the air as a teen-ager, are genuine pioneers. They invented the teen dance show format when Dick Clark was in knickers. In fact, the duo got first crack at hosting "Bandstand," but had to turn down the opportunity because they were tied to radio contracts.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carl Upchurch, 53, formerly of South Philadelphia, an author and social activist who organized a nationwide gang summit in 1993, died May 2 at Grant Medical Center near his home of 16 years in Newark, Ohio. The cause of death was not made public pending the results of toxicology tests. A gang member in South Philadelphia from age 9, Mr. Upchurch spent 18 years in reformatories and prisons. While serving a sentence at the State Correctional Institution-Pittsburgh, better known as Western Penitentiary, in the 1970s he developed the ideas that led to his vocation as a prisoner advocate.
NEWS
August 7, 1987
The circumstances were pathetic almost beyond belief. The little girl's dried-out body was found in May, kneeling beside her bed in a West Philadelphia housing project apartment, apparently in the spot where she had died three months before. The girl's 22-year old mother has been charged with murder for allowing the child to starve to death. The death raised the question of whether others were to blame as well. Child welfare workers working for the city had been aware that Sylvia Smith had been the victim of child abuse prior to her death.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cinelli's Country House Restaurant, the famous Cherry Hill establishment that collapsed into bankruptcy three years ago, is expected to succumb to the bulldozer by the end of the summer. Rouse & Associates, the development firm that bought the property in December for $2.4 million, has received a demolition permit from the township and plans to raze the building by late August or early September, according to Rouse regional partner Robert Heimerl. Rouse plans to build a $20 million 12- to 15-story office building on the site, at Route 38 and Haddonfield Road.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Neshaminy Adult School will conduct registration for its fall classes on Wednesday and Thursday. The school offers more than 100 evening classes in a variety of subject areas. Registration is scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at Neshaminy High School on Old Lincoln Highway in Langhorne and from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Carl Sandburg Middle School on Harmony Road in Levittown. Classes, which will begin the week of Oct. 5, will take place at Neshaminy High School, Carl Sandburg Middle School, Poquessing Middle School, and Neshaminy Middle School.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Reny arrived for freshman orientation at the University of Pennsylvania in August, just days after she had started to walk again. Penn assigned her a first-floor dorm room and scheduled her classes near each other, knowing it was a struggle for her just to be on campus. She did not hide what had happened to her. But she didn't want to alarm anyone either. "No one's expecting someone to say they were in a bombing just because they're on crutches," she said. "You expect them to say they sprained their ankle or fell off their bike.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Acme Markets intends to build a 1.4-million-square-foot warehouse and distribution complex near Reading, worrying leaders of the union that represents the company's warehouse workers in Philadelphia. Acme, operated by American Stores Inc., has two warehouses in Philadelphia that together employ about 750 in about 1.1 million square feet, according to Jim Brennan, president of the warehouse workers' union, Teamsters Local 169. The local, fearing that Acme plans to move those operations out of the city, will hold an informational meeting this morning at its headquarters.
FOOD
June 13, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Could you tell me if milk and powdered eggs have any cholesterol? I have to watch my cholesterol intake. - Tana Dear Tana: If the powdered milk were whole milk, yes, it would contain cholesterol, as do powdered whole eggs. However, powdered non-fat milk, which is the kind normally found in the supermarket, does not contain cholesterol. Powdered egg whites (as opposed to powdered or dried whole eggs) also do not contain cholesterol. Dear Polly: Here's a quick dish: Heat a can of chicken-and-rice soup (don't dilute)
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Wayne Curtis, Special to The Inquirer
There's a technique to visiting country stores in rural Maine. Unfortunately, I don't know it. When I walk into a store like Solari's, here in Fryeburg, the chattering stops and it grows unnaturally quiet. People sitting on stools and milk crates sip coffee, eat their powdered-sugar doughnuts and don't say a word. They just look at me like I've stopped in from Mars on my way to the Maine coast. I've tried most tricks. I've worn baseball caps (Red Sox) and tractor caps (John Deere)
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Superior Court jury convicted a former Mount Holly councilman and his friend yesterday of hate crimes for their roles in a racially motivated bar fight two years ago. Robert Byham, 40, of Mount Holly, was convicted of two counts of bias assault and two counts of bias harassment after the jury found he used a racial slur in front of two African American men and then tried to head-butt one and swing at the other after they angrily confronted him....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She's young. She's smart. She's outtahere. Yesterday was Channel 6 reporter Kristen Sze's last day on the air for WPVI. She's departing for New York City, and a spot as the sole East Coast correspondent for the syndicated show Extra, which airs locally on the competition, WCAU (Channel 10), at 7 p.m. Sze describes the show as "a People magazine on TV," covering feature stories, interesting people, medical developments and, of course, celebrities and their woes (the show was big on Diana's funeral, Versace's murder, and recent fave, the Marv Albert trial-cum-guilty plea)
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob McMurtrie was a smart, lanky kid with eyes for bigger places than Two Street, the hard-bitten pocket of South Philadelphia where he came from. At 22, McMurtrie set out on a journey of unfathomable distance in pursuit of glitter and riches. From Two Street, he traveled to Center City, where he got a job in 1964 as a clerk in a real estate office. He worked hard and kept his eye out for opportunities. By 1990, he'd stitched together a small empire. His assets were $29 million.
SPORTS
March 5, 1996 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Most Americans haven't spread out a map on the dining room table, planning their Road to Atlanta. They are focusing on March Madness, the NHL, NBA and the return of major league baseball. Athletes, however, have been training for and thinking about the Summer Olympics for years. The Olympics are on their minds day and night. In gymnasiums and pools, on tracks and fields, Atlanta has been the favorite destination of Olympic hopefuls as they pursue their dream. The Olympic Swim Trials are this week in Indianapolis.
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