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TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | James F. Lee, Washington Post
Tucked into a corner of the wall above a stairway leading to the third floor of the Corbit-Sharp House in Odessa, Del., is a tiny doorway. In 1845, the cubbyhole behind this door sheltered a runaway slave named Sam. When the local sheriff came looking for the runaway, the lady of the house, Mary Corbit, led him right up to the stairway. As she had hoped, the sheriff couldn't imagine that the space behind the door was large enough to shelter a human being, so he turned away to continue his search throughout the rest of the house.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Members of Terpsichore Antiqua perform dances from the 18th century. The group danced Sunday at Windlestrae Park in Horsham during a party to celebrate Montgomery Township's 275th anniversary.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Lara Wozniak, Special to The Inquirer
A house and barn built more than 200 years ago will be protected from destruction under a land subdivision plan approved Tuesday by the Charlestown Township Planning Commission. The 18th century buildings on Union Hill Road, owned by Malvern resident Stintson Markley, have both state and national recognition as historic sites. His plan calls for 54 acres to be subdivided into four plots to provide revenue for maintaining the buildings. The plan will be reviewed by the township Board of Supervisors for probable approval in December.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
It was billed as an authentic 18th-century day of leisure and entertainment, with storytellers, musicians and games for the children at the Colonial Plantation in Ridley Creek State Park. But if the rainy weather of this summer had occurred 200 years ago, it's not likely that the family members who worked the plantation would have had any time for leisure. They would have been working to put away the waterlogged and weather-thinned crop for the winter. "It would have been a hungry winter - and there wouldn't have been any money made, either," said James Nichols, 31, the plantation's resident farmer.
NEWS
August 17, 1997 | By Julie Blair, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The one thing Martha Washington and her slave had in common was society's failure to recognize them as full-fledged citizens. Neither the first lady nor her slave could earn a wage. Neither could buy or sell property. Neither could even draw up a will. "When the Founding Fathers said, 'All men are created equal,' what they meant was all men were created equal," said Greg Knouff, a research associate at the David Library of the American Revolution. But "you can't understand the American Revolution by just looking at men. You have to understand women," he said.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Eighteenth-century British author Lord Chesterfield did not think much of dancing but conceded that a young man should learn to do it well "and not be ridiculous, though in a ridiculous act. " Chesterfield had reason to worry. Dancing - at least for the merchant and upper classes - was a social grace that signaled breeding and refinement. Done well, it opened political doors, earned praise and adulation, even helped snare a mate. Performed poorly, it could bring shame and disgrace.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The site of the historic Spring Mill Plantation near the Schuylkill represents a good example of an early American industrial network. From the early 18th century well into the 20th, it was an important part of our area's economic development. Local historian Edward T. Addison Jr., writing in the Bulletin of the Historical Society of Montgomery County (spring 1992), says: "The Miller's House is the only complete building of the Spring Mill complex that exists today. It stands as a monument to the once-thriving grist mill established by Davis Williams . . . most likely, 1704.
NEWS
December 15, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What could be more perfect than a Louis Quinze armchair, the sublime marriage of form and function, Yves Labbe mused last week as he eyed the battered frame of a formerly elegant Louis parked in the corner of his Norristown wood shop. The chair was missing its back and seat, but Labbe loved it anyway, tracing the line of its leg with his finger. "For me, there is nothing better in proportion and beauty. For me, it is the best," he said, his French baritone rising a little in astonishment.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The manor house and barn stand at the foot of a bold hill that overlooks the Brandywine River where the waters make a sharp U curve southward toward Delaware. Hence the house's name, Big Bend. The place is isolated, hidden, but alive rather than desolate. Big Bend is certainly off the beaten path. To get to the start of that path, one must travel less than a mile and a half south of Chadds Ford along the Brandywine on Route 100. Off to the left is a private country lane whose entrance is marked by two stone pillars adorned by sculpted turtles.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | For The Inquirer / BILL CAIN
Nicholas St. John, 8, of Naples, Fla., tries a wooden puppet with help from Louise Bleil, of Philadelphia, at Washington Crossing State Park. Games from the 18th century were demonstrated yesterday.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Population: 8,516 (2010) Median household income: $86,092 (2012) Area: 8.9 square miles Settlements in the last three months: 20 Homes for sale: 68 Average days on market: 86 Median sales price: $325,000 Housing stock: 2,652 units, dating from the 18th century to the present School district: Phoenixville Area SOURCES: U.S. Census Bureau; City-Data.com; Joseph Scott McArdle, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox &...
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the winter of 1777-78, Gen. George Washington marched his tired, beaten, hungry, and sick army to Valley Forge, where he could keep an eye on British Gen. William Howe's troops ensconced in Philadelphia. The Continental Army desperately needed to determine the enemy's plans. The Americans needed . . . a spy. "You, what's your spy name?" asked Washington - also known as reenactor David Scott Taylor - as he plucked a likely volunteer from the crowd during Valley Forge National Historical Park's Secrets and Spies tour Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Bartram was known for the wooden boxes he filled with botanical goodies from the New World and shipped off to wealthy customers in England and beyond. Though long gone from marketplace and memory, those utilitarian boxes and their quirky contents - plants, seeds, and "curiosities" such as birds' nests and live turtles - supported the 18th-century botanist's influential research and plant nursery. Now, they serve as artistic inspiration for an unusual exhibition called Bartram's Boxes Remix , a collaboration between Bartram's Garden in Southwest Philadelphia and the Center for Art in Wood in Old City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the oldest surviving botanic garden in North America, Bartram's Garden has seen more change than most. With more to come. As part of a three-year plan designed to reinvigorate its historic mission, bring back Bartram-era plants, and attract a wider audience, the 285-year-old garden on the Schuylkill in Southwest Philadelphia has embarked on the restoration of the Carr Garden, a small piece of the larger garden that, over time, devolved from...
NEWS
January 27, 2013
Given last week's historic pop-political culture moment - the first "American Idol" winner to sing at a presidential inauguration - this seems a good time to look at other inaugural firsts. 1. The first president to take the oath from the chief justice of the United States. a. George Washington. b. John Adams. c. Thomas Jefferson. d. James Monroe. 2. He was the first to walk to and from his swearing-in ceremony. a. Thomas Jefferson. b. Andrew Jackson. c. Theodore Roosevelt.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | James F. Lee, Washington Post
Tucked into a corner of the wall above a stairway leading to the third floor of the Corbit-Sharp House in Odessa, Del., is a tiny doorway. In 1845, the cubbyhole behind this door sheltered a runaway slave named Sam. When the local sheriff came looking for the runaway, the lady of the house, Mary Corbit, led him right up to the stairway. As she had hoped, the sheriff couldn't imagine that the space behind the door was large enough to shelter a human being, so he turned away to continue his search throughout the rest of the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
larissa Dillon used to mortify her teenage son by wearing her work clothes - a colonial-style getup - while driving him somewhere. "He'd say, 'Oh for God's sake, Mom, you look like a baby in that bonnet!' " she recalls. But Dillon was - and, at 79, remains - unmoved. That's because for this ardent devotee of 18th-century "domestic arts" in Southeastern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary life at that time, in this place, is worth exploring. If that means "wearing funny clothes" and sporting what looks remarkably like a baby bonnet at the wheel of her car, too bad. And by the way, it's not a bonnet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Gruff Rhys, the leader of the psychedelic-pop group Super Furry Animals, plays a solo show at PhilaMOCA on Sunday, it will be a key stop on the Welsh songwriter's second "investigative" tour of the Americas. Rhys' first such trek took him to Patagonia, where he looked into the roots of Rene Griffiths, an Argentine cowboy singer who is descended from Dafydd Jones, a distant relative of Rhys' who attempted to found a utopian Welsh-speaking community in South America in the late 19th century.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With all the development that has occurred in Philadelphia, archaeologists thought it unlikely they would ever find significant remnants of early Native American cultures. Those artifacts would have been deeply buried, carted away, or crushed. But not long ago, along I-95 in North Philadelphia, they uncovered tobacco pipes, arrowheads, pottery, and other Native American artifacts dating back 3,000 years. Near Mount Holly, they have begun to unearth portions of the African American community of Timbuctoo, founded in the 1820s and a station on the Underground Railroad.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Juan Pedro Domecq Solis, 69, who helped define the evolution of the bullfight in the late 20th century, died Monday in a head-on crash with a truck in Higuera de la Sierra, near his Lo Alvaro estate in southwest Spain. As one of Spain's foremost breeders, he first developed what became known as the "artist bull," bred to enhance sleek yet muscular lines, and later the "athlete bull," aimed at giving a more thrilling performance while facing matadors in the bullring. Known within bullfighting circles simply as Juan Pedro, Domecq had inherited Spain's oldest breeding estate - Veragua, founded in the 18th century - which his grandfather Juan Pedro Domecq y Nunez de Villavicencio had bought in 1939.
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