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21st Century

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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | BY LILLIAN KELLOGG & MICHELLE HERCZOG
THE NATIONAL Conference on Citizenship and National Constitution Center last week celebrated the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, and the Partnership for 21st Century Skills is exploring how citizenship has changed in the 21st century. Rapid technological advancements, economic globalization and political forces around the world have had a profound impact on our democracy and on what it means to be a productive member of society.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In his 1973 play Equus , Peter Shaffer tells a detective story, based on an actual event, about a reluctant psychiatrist attempting to unravel the case of a 17-year-old boy who blinded six horses. The play's confrontation of religion with psychiatry helped set the tone for pop culture's understanding of mind and behavior. Forty years later, books by Oliver Sacks, shows on NPR, and hit TV shows and movies ( The Silence of the Lambs , Criminal Minds ) have fleshed out the genre and broadened popular knowledge of aberrant psychology.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three big letters graced the stage at the Temple Performing Arts Center on Tuesday: capital T, capital E, capital D. The event was TEDx Philly: The City. About 600 people had come for a global exercise in fresh thinking, to reenvision Philadelphia as, in the words of kickoff speaker Mayor Nutter, " the city of the 21st century. " In a town long a culturing medium for new ideas about urban life, TEDx Philly came at an energized moment. TEDx was on one part of North Broad while Occupy Philadelphia (also a call to think again)
REAL_ESTATE
October 28, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When he was 20 years old, single, and the beneficiary of a small inheritance, Adam Berr purchased a vintage 1939 log cabin in Medford. Its condition was not pristine, and, at 870 square feet, the cabin was hardly commodious. Today, Berr, 33, is a specialist in computer adaptation for the handicapped, married since 2007, and a father. And his bachelor log cabin has grown up, too. It's been expanded, improved, and transformed into a better version of itself, since Berr and his wife were determined to hang onto the cabin's log roots while expanding its livability.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bob Berry's house on the banks of the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville has evolved, to say the least. Born as a 19th-century farmhouse, it got its first makeover in the 1940s when famed architect Oskar Stonerov transformed it into an International-style haven for his family, which eventually included four children, and his wife, Elizabeth, who started a popular cooperative preschool there. Then, when Bob Berry bought the structure in 2005, his brother-in-law and architect John Kohlhaus remade it to fit 21st century needs.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Castleberry Hill doesn't come across as the ideal residential neighborhood. A brisk walk from the CNN Center and the Georgia Dome, the area is home to the Kingan Co. Pork and Beef Packers plant, among other industrial and commercial facilities. But because of the neighborhood's proximity to downtown Atlanta, abandoned factories and warehouses are being converted to upscale housing. The old General Electric factory is now a condominium, with prices starting in the low $100,000s.
NEWS
February 8, 1986 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan told an enthusiastic group of high school students yesterday that "there never was a better time to be young, alive and American. " And the 75-year-old President said he was so optimistic about the future that he planned to "stick around for a good part" of the next century. After touring a computer class at the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in suburban Annandale, Va., Reagan brought his cheerleading message of hope for the future to a packed assembly in the gymnasium.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | By Crispin Sartwell
As we raise our children, we must always keep in mind our goal: achieving excellence in the global economy of the 21st century. There is a reason that political, business and educational leaders, like windup dolls, keep repeating this phrase: global economy of the 21st century; global economy of the 21st century; global economy of the 21st century. The reason is that some mad scientist or spin doctor has removed their tiny brains. Nevertheless, we must achieve excellence in the global economy of the 21st century.
NEWS
March 21, 2005
At a recent conference on education, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates called America's high schools obsolete. (Read his speech at http://inquirer.philly.com/opinion/). What are you seeing at your school, or what would you like to see, that would help "our students graduate from high school ready for college, work, and citizenship"? What has to happen - locally, politically - in order to redesign high schools that produce students who are ready for the challenges of the 21st century? Send essays of 300 to 400 words, including a phone number and address for verification, by March 28 to Voices/High Schools, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, PA 19101.
NEWS
May 15, 2008
WHEN is the Daily News going to join the 21st century and allow the public to enter the Home Run Payoff via the Internet? "No purchase necessary," but to do that, you have only one option: travel to 400 N. Broad St. Who has the time? So, you buy a paper. And if you want to play again, you have to buy another paper. Why? Because "No photocopies accepted. " Both the Flyers and Sixers have games for the fans that they can enter via their Web site. George Reppert, Philadelphia
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 10, 2015
ISSUE | EMPLOYMENT Grim outlook Advances in technology are rendering many people unemployable or not employable at their former wages ("Where have all the wages gone?" Sunday). The problem is worsening rapidly, and there are no viable solutions. If the government tries to mandate employment and salary levels, that could drive businesses out of the region, out of the state, or out of the country. Closing the borders could lead to a scenario that would please Ayn Rand. Significant increases in education spending can buy us time, but better education alone will not solve the problem: Many people will simply lack the ability to function in the 21st-century workplace.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
THIS FALL, I got a crash course in the life and times of Bernie Sanders as I researched my e-book on the Democratic presidential candidate called The Bern Identity , coming out next month on Amazon.com. I learned how the future Vermont senator rejected the Cold War ideology of both political parties as a University of Chicago student in the early 1960s and joined the campus chapter of the Young People's Socialist League, the so-called Yipsels - at the same time that he was becoming a leader in protests against racial discrimination in housing and public schools.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama will visit Philadelphia to deliver the keynote address July 14 at the 106th NAACP Annual Convention, the organization announced Wednesday. The conference, whose theme is "Pursuing Liberty in the Face of Injustice," will come at a time of racial unrest throughout the country. "That's a great moment," Rodney Muhammad, president of Philadelphia's NAACP chapter, said upon hearing the news of the president's visit. While in Philadelphia, Obama will also attend an event for the upcoming Democratic National Convention, a White House official said.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
When I was in medical school at the end of the 20th century, I was taught that Alzheimer's disease was a rare cause of dementia in middle-aged adults. The elderly had senility caused by an indecipherable mess of pathologies and aging. Now, in the 21st century, Alzheimer's is called an epidemic. It has even helped five-time nominee Julianne Moore win her first Academy Award. In Still Alice, based on the novel of the same title, Moore portrays professor Alice Howland, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and who suffers the relentless decay of her capacities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* THE BOOK OF NEGROES. 8 tonight, tomorrow and Wednesday, BET.   MINISERIES are back in vogue, commissioned by networks looking for event programming and headlined by big names who wouldn't think of committing to multiple seasons. Good as an "Olive Kitteridge" or a "Fargo" might be, they can feel, well, mini next to the blockbusters of the '70s and '80s - shows like "Roots," "The Winds of War" and "The Thorn Birds. " At six hours over three nights, BET's Canadian-produced "The Book of Negroes," which premieres tonight, is half the length of "Roots," but it's epic in scope, with a cast that includes Oscar winners Cuba Gooding Jr. and Louis Gossett Jr. (who, 38 years ago, co-starred in "Roots")
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most kids in the region, Tuesday's "snow day" was a perfect storm: A forecast bad enough to cancel classes, yet a dusting so mild that they could spend their unexpected holiday at the mall or the multiplex. But at Bryn Mawr's Baldwin School, it was an ideal day to stay inside the house and read the Chinese philosopher Confucius or sit at the computer coding new apps. In fact, they had no choice. That's because the Main Line girls' academy has replaced "snow days" with "cyber days" - alternative online learning on days when the local roads are deemed impassable but the Information Superhighway is wide open.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the fourth anniversary of Egypt's Tahrir Square uprising, which became the hallmark of the Arab Spring. As though to mock those long-dead hopes, Yemen and Libya have collapsed, Syria lies in ruins, and much of Syria and Iraq are occupied by ISIS. Several youthful leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, revolt have been jailed (while the Egyptian leader they ousted, Hosni Mubarak, was just freed from prison). The death last week of Saudi Arabian King Abdullah - whose successor is also old and ill - adds to the turmoil in the region.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bob Berry's house on the banks of the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville has evolved, to say the least. Born as a 19th-century farmhouse, it got its first makeover in the 1940s when famed architect Oskar Stonerov transformed it into an International-style haven for his family, which eventually included four children, and his wife, Elizabeth, who started a popular cooperative preschool there. Then, when Bob Berry bought the structure in 2005, his brother-in-law and architect John Kohlhaus remade it to fit 21st century needs.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seekers of wisdom once climbed mountains to seek counsel from the Dalai Lama, yet there he was Tuesday morning in the basketball arena of Princeton University. "What is the key to happiness?" a student asked. A hush fell over the audience as the 79-year-old leader of Tibetan Buddhism pondered a reply. "Money," he said. The crowd appeared startled, then a few began to laugh. "Or sex," His Holiness added. As laughter echoed through the cavernous arena, no one was laughing louder than the 14th Dalai Lama himself, who had already revealed his playful side by wearing an orange Princeton cap atop his shaved head.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maker Designer, collector, and design advocate Lisa Roberts of Center City. Creation DesignPOP (Rizzoli, September 2014), a coffee-table-worthy compendium of game-changers in 21st-century product design. The book identifies key trends like sustainability, design for social responsibility, and advancing technology. Vision "One of my agendas is to make design understandable and accessible to people who are not in the industry," Roberts said. "It's like when you go into a museum and you have a curator who takes youaround and talks to you about the artworks.
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