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21st Century

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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | BY LILLIAN KELLOGG & MICHELLE HERCZOG
THE NATIONAL Conference on Citizenship and National Constitution Center last week celebrated the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, and the Partnership for 21st Century Skills is exploring how citizenship has changed in the 21st century. Rapid technological advancements, economic globalization and political forces around the world have had a profound impact on our democracy and on what it means to be a productive member of society.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In his 1973 play Equus , Peter Shaffer tells a detective story, based on an actual event, about a reluctant psychiatrist attempting to unravel the case of a 17-year-old boy who blinded six horses. The play's confrontation of religion with psychiatry helped set the tone for pop culture's understanding of mind and behavior. Forty years later, books by Oliver Sacks, shows on NPR, and hit TV shows and movies ( The Silence of the Lambs , Criminal Minds ) have fleshed out the genre and broadened popular knowledge of aberrant psychology.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three big letters graced the stage at the Temple Performing Arts Center on Tuesday: capital T, capital E, capital D. The event was TEDx Philly: The City. About 600 people had come for a global exercise in fresh thinking, to reenvision Philadelphia as, in the words of kickoff speaker Mayor Nutter, " the city of the 21st century. " In a town long a culturing medium for new ideas about urban life, TEDx Philly came at an energized moment. TEDx was on one part of North Broad while Occupy Philadelphia (also a call to think again)
REAL_ESTATE
October 28, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When he was 20 years old, single, and the beneficiary of a small inheritance, Adam Berr purchased a vintage 1939 log cabin in Medford. Its condition was not pristine, and, at 870 square feet, the cabin was hardly commodious. Today, Berr, 33, is a specialist in computer adaptation for the handicapped, married since 2007, and a father. And his bachelor log cabin has grown up, too. It's been expanded, improved, and transformed into a better version of itself, since Berr and his wife were determined to hang onto the cabin's log roots while expanding its livability.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bob Berry's house on the banks of the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville has evolved, to say the least. Born as a 19th-century farmhouse, it got its first makeover in the 1940s when famed architect Oskar Stonerov transformed it into an International-style haven for his family, which eventually included four children, and his wife, Elizabeth, who started a popular cooperative preschool there. Then, when Bob Berry bought the structure in 2005, his brother-in-law and architect John Kohlhaus remade it to fit 21st century needs.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Castleberry Hill doesn't come across as the ideal residential neighborhood. A brisk walk from the CNN Center and the Georgia Dome, the area is home to the Kingan Co. Pork and Beef Packers plant, among other industrial and commercial facilities. But because of the neighborhood's proximity to downtown Atlanta, abandoned factories and warehouses are being converted to upscale housing. The old General Electric factory is now a condominium, with prices starting in the low $100,000s.
NEWS
February 8, 1986 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan told an enthusiastic group of high school students yesterday that "there never was a better time to be young, alive and American. " And the 75-year-old President said he was so optimistic about the future that he planned to "stick around for a good part" of the next century. After touring a computer class at the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in suburban Annandale, Va., Reagan brought his cheerleading message of hope for the future to a packed assembly in the gymnasium.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Wine on supermarket shelves. Beer sold in 12-packs. Sunday liquor purchases. Is this really Pennsylvania? Last week's enactment of a law that will let hundreds of stores add by-the-bottle wine sales was the latest in a slow drip of efforts by lawmakers and regulators to loosen the state's long-derided grip on its system of alcohol control, and nudge the Keystone State into the 21st century. What remains to be seen is whether the changes will be enough, for now, to quell the advocates who have called for turning over the system to private enterprise, or whether it will, instead, just speed the momentum in that direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical opens at the Academy of Music on Tuesday. It's playwright Douglas McGrath's tale of how musicmaker Carole King went from writing pop songs in the late 1950s to becoming the goddess of the singer-songwriter movement with 1971's multiplatinum album Tapestry . The jukebox musical spins King hits soulful ("Some Kind of Wonderful") and heartfelt ("You've Got a Friend"). But a good half of the show's tunes come from two of King's best buddies, the famously married songwriting team Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | By Crispin Sartwell
As we raise our children, we must always keep in mind our goal: achieving excellence in the global economy of the 21st century. There is a reason that political, business and educational leaders, like windup dolls, keep repeating this phrase: global economy of the 21st century; global economy of the 21st century; global economy of the 21st century. The reason is that some mad scientist or spin doctor has removed their tiny brains. Nevertheless, we must achieve excellence in the global economy of the 21st century.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 2003, George Funkhouser and Susan Nitka drove to Bridgeton, N.J., where George, who buys and sells precious metals and antiques, was going to meet with a client. At the time, the couple were living in Philadelphia's Port Richmond section in a home she had inherited from her parents. They had been together for a decade and were considering buying a larger house. That day in Bridgeton, they drove down streets lined with mansions built in the 19th century, when the city was a center for industry in South Jersey.
NEWS
June 24, 2016
"BREAKING: SIX-PACKS APPROVED FOR SALE AT PENNSYLVANIA GAS STATIONS!" - Headline on Gov. Wolf's blog WITH THAT, Pennsylvania, your beer laws have finally entered the 20th century. And, yes, I do mean last century, for despite the screaming caps, last month's approval is both meaningless and illustrative of the small thinking that accompanies liquor regulation in this state. For starters, the approval applies only to nine gas stations statewide, and most are in the boondocks, so . . . next time you are in Mahanoy City, fill 'er up!
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Wine on supermarket shelves. Beer sold in 12-packs. Sunday liquor purchases. Is this really Pennsylvania? Last week's enactment of a law that will let hundreds of stores add by-the-bottle wine sales was the latest in a slow drip of efforts by lawmakers and regulators to loosen the state's long-derided grip on its system of alcohol control, and nudge the Keystone State into the 21st century. What remains to be seen is whether the changes will be enough, for now, to quell the advocates who have called for turning over the system to private enterprise, or whether it will, instead, just speed the momentum in that direction.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Carved canoes and hand-drawn carriages climb the walls. Woven baskets and wooden cradles hang from the ceiling. In the dimly glowing concrete tower, a gorgeous mess of early-American relics seems to come alive. "We call this the 'oh, my gosh' room," said director Doug Dolan - because that's what people generally say when they walk into the central court, crafted by Doylestown-born archaeologist and historian Henry Mercer in 1916. It's a spell that has been cast for the last 100 years upon visitors to the Mercer Museum, where the display of artifacts from 19th-century life has remained largely unchanged.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
SOMETHING must be done to cut the tangled mess of knots that has paralyzed state government over spending and taxation. Everyone knows how bad it has been, with Gov. Wolf and the Republican-controlled Legislature entangled in ceaseless rounds of proposals and counterproposals. It stymied passage of a state budget last year, resulting in real pain for local governments and school districts that depend on a steady flow of state subsidies. The governor, at least, is making soothing noises about budget negotiations this year, but there is no reason to think real progress will be made.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
By Joe Queenan George Santayana was sitting in his stately, well-appointed Cambridge home when the housekeeper announced he had visitors. Seconds later, Mrs. Hudson ushered three oddly garbed men into the parlor, where he greeted them with sherry and cheroots. "We'll cut right to the chase, Mr. Santayana," the tallest of the three, one Jared Polanski, said. "We're visitors from the 21st century, and we've come back in time to ask you for a huge favor. " "So H.G. Wells was right about time travel?"
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Robert Garnett is a professor of English literature at Gettysburg College Four centuries in the grave, Shakespeare is still with us. But times change; tastes alter; language evolves. Will he survive the 21st century? Over the years, he has annoyed even his greatest admirers. His friend (and rival) Ben Jonson scoffed at his learning ("small Latin, and less Greek") and wished he had revised more carefully. A great 18th-century critic complained that Shakespeare's swelling rhetoric often tarted up "trivial sentiments and vulgar ideas"; more perplexing was Shakespeare's addiction to "quibbles," or puns: "A quibble is to Shakespeare, what luminous vapours are to the traveller; . . . it is sure to lead him out of his way, and sure to engulf him in the mire.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
NEW YORK'S long-awaited primary had two big winners Tuesday night, the GOP's Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton, but literally millions of losers - as huge swaths of the electorate were disenfranchised by the state's arcane voting rules and then by an inexplicable, massive purge of voting rolls in New York City. A night that was supposed to bring clarity to one of the most divisive presidential campaigns in decades instead became an embarrassing, muddled nightmare for American democracy, as horror stories mounted from polling places all over the nation's largest city.
NEWS
April 15, 2016
There is a consensus that aggression by one nation against another is a serious matter, but there is no comparable consensus about what constitutes aggression. Waging aggressive war was one charge against Nazi leaders at the 1946 Nuremberg war crimes trials, but 70 years later, it is unclear that aggression, properly understood, must involve war, as commonly understood. Or that war, in today's context of novel destructive capabilities, must involve "the use of armed force," which the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court says is constitutive of an "act of aggression.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical opens at the Academy of Music on Tuesday. It's playwright Douglas McGrath's tale of how musicmaker Carole King went from writing pop songs in the late 1950s to becoming the goddess of the singer-songwriter movement with 1971's multiplatinum album Tapestry . The jukebox musical spins King hits soulful ("Some Kind of Wonderful") and heartfelt ("You've Got a Friend"). But a good half of the show's tunes come from two of King's best buddies, the famously married songwriting team Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.
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