CollectionsAbington Art Center
IN THE NEWS

Abington Art Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Already sweating under the blazing sun, Fritz Dietel looked like a typical carpenter as he fitted several pre-cut pieces of plywood and poplar together one morning last week. But Dietel, a sculptor from South Philadelphia, was actually hard at work on a new exhibit for the Abington Art Center's outdoor sculpture garden. Entitled Key Hole, the arched shelter stands in the upper yard of Alverthorpe Manor, near Settlement Music School, and is designed to serve as the primary entrance to the garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Amid the fast pace of gallery exhibits, the Abington Art Center is providing a welcome period of stock-taking. The occasion is the center's 70th anniversary year, highlighted in a special exhibit, "Forever Young. " The display celebrates seven decades of activity by featuring the work of 26 regional artists linked with the art center, as exhibitors or teachers, during the last 20 years, some now enjoying considerable recognition. They include Katie Adams, Astrid Bowlby, Frank Bramblett, Steven Donegan, Ron Klein, Blaise Tobia, Sarah Van Keuren, and Chris Zmijewski - familiar artists all. Historic content and the center's own history are especially important here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
The increasing authority its curated "Solo Series" exhibitions of regional art have won for the Abington Art Center is reflected in their progressively more adventurous character. Abington's current show by four soloists is an excellent example. It doesn't genuflect before tradition, yet in several instances takes as much notice of life as of art. And like its predecessors, it has a good long run of 2 1/2 months, a rarity for contemporary work in our region. Front and center is Jedediah Morfit, who impresses because he possesses a genuine vision.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Only two weeks remain to see one of the most sublime exhibitions of the fall season. "Winifred Lutz: Between Perception and Definition," the first large survey of the works of Lutz, a Philadelphia-based artist, has the entire Abington Art Center to itself and also includes the poetic site-specific outdoor installations she has been making in the center's sculpture park since 1992. At first, the indoor component of the survey appears to be one large multipart work consisting of groupings of natural objects and ones made by Lutz.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The elfin bodies of the twin gymnasts suggest that they are children, yet their deeply intense eyes and tightly developed leg and thigh muscles seem far too mature for 7-year-olds. Dressed only in leotards, their arms locked together, the twin girls stare into the camera. The result is a poignant and telling photograph by Irving Orenstein that won an honorable mention in the Abington Art Center's annual Juried Members' Exhibition. Twin Gymnasts, a gelatin silver plate photograph, is among the 80 or so works juried by painter and art teacher Bruce Samuelson that will be on display at the art center through Feb. 2. An opening reception and awards ceremony is scheduled for tomorrow afternoon.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When painter Kaye Schonbach was hospitalized a few months back because of her continuing battle with multiple sclerosis, her friend Bill McKendrick brought her a bouquet of fresh flowers. That inspired her to begin sketching the flowers, then painting them in a rainbow of watercolors. The red carnations, yellow chrysanthemums, green leaves, white baby's breath and tiny purple blossoms were transformed into a work of art that Schonbach calls The Gift. It is on view through July 30 at Abington Art Center, as part of the ninth annual members' exhibition of Nuvisions for Disabled Artists.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Daring. Diverse. Distinctive. If one were limited to three impressions, those could well be the words used to describe the divergent elements in Abington Art Center's current exhibition, "Works on Paper. " The exhibit is daring in the way Brian Edington takes erotic nude photographs of men in Back to Back and Wave Length and juxtaposes the images in geometric symmetrical patterns, giving the effect of a kaleidoscope view flattened out on paper. The works are diverse because of the myriad styles and types of paper chosen - from Bill Scanga's strips of latex paint samples, on which are produced graphite drawings, to the translucent Japanese rice paper Christine Blair used to put down her woodcuts.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As photographer Henk Vanderlely shot the ceramic installation, artist Laurie Haggart stood silent, steady, patient, as she held a spotlight trained strategically on her untitled work. The pair, intense with concentration, were in the gallery earlier this week at the Abington Art Center, in the midst of "Clay on the Walls," the current exhibition that runs through April 13. Haggart is among the 10 regional artists selected for the show by curator David Gamber, a clay artist and instructor at the art center.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, the exhibit by Nuvisions looks like most other professional art shows. The walls of the Abington Art Center are lined with landscapes, portraits, collages and still-lifes of flowers and clusters of apples. The difference is not on the canvas, but in the people behind the art. The artists belong to Nuvisions for Disabled Artists, a group in which physically disabled professional artists work together to exhibit and market their crafts. "It's the same as any other very good show," said Kaye Schonbach, founder of Nuvisions.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial will be held Saturday, Oct. 19, for John A. Whereat, 55, a longtime Philadelphia sculptor, who died Saturday, Aug. 31, of heart failure at his home in Roxborough. The memorial is planned for 10 a.m. at the Radnor Friends Meeting House, Conestoga and Sproul Roads, his family announced last week. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Narberth, Mr. Whereat earned a bachelor's degree and, later, a master's degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania. The bulk of his work, done in a garage on Spring Lane, is in private collections along the East Coast.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
FAMILY Philadelphia Dance Day Twenty dance studios offer free lessons in hip-hop, modern dance, jazz, ballet, tango, salsa, bachata, etc. Check ahead to see if kids are welcome at the class you want to attend. The day's finale is - what else? - a dance party on Rittenhouse Square. Various locations, 10 a.m.-5:45 p.m. tomorrow, free; dance afterparty at Ethical Society, 1906 Rittenhouse Sq., 6-11:30 p.m. tomorrow, $5, philadelphiadanceday.com. Apollo auditions For the first time, judges from famed Harlem theater seek talent in Philly.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Only two weeks remain to see one of the most sublime exhibitions of the fall season. "Winifred Lutz: Between Perception and Definition," the first large survey of the works of Lutz, a Philadelphia-based artist, has the entire Abington Art Center to itself and also includes the poetic site-specific outdoor installations she has been making in the center's sculpture park since 1992. At first, the indoor component of the survey appears to be one large multipart work consisting of groupings of natural objects and ones made by Lutz.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
MANY PHILADELPHIA art galleries stay open later on the first Friday of the month. Some schedule special events on other days. Here's what's happening Friday night and through November at art spaces around the region. Abington Art Center. 515 Meetinghouse Road, Jenkintown, 215-887-4882, abingtonartcenter.org. "Between Perception and Definition: The Work of Winifred Lutz. " Plus pieces by Thomas Vance, Jeanne Jaffe, Lonnie Graham, Mei Ling Hom. Through Nov. 25. ADM Gallery and Studio.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
MANY GALLERIES stay open later on the first Friday of the month. Some schedule special events for second Fridays. Here's what's happening tonight and this month at art spaces around the region. Abington Art Center. 515 Meetinghouse Road, Jenkintown, 215-887-4882, abingtonartcenter.org. "Between Perception and Definition: The Work of Winifred Lutz. " Plus pieces by Thomas Vance, Jeanne Jaffe, Lonnie Graham, Mei Ling Hom. Saturday-Nov. 25. Reception 3-5 p.m. Saturday; tours from 1 p.m. $5. Artists' House Gallery.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Edith Newhall
Every so often Works on Paper Gallery sheds its somewhat staid personality as a purveyor of prints and drawings by blue-chip contemporary artists, and the change is so abrupt — so seemingly out of nowhere — that it always makes me smile. It turns out that Evan Slepian, the gallery's owner, fell under under the spell of street art four years ago and will probably continue his presentations of urban artists he admires. The latest to be given the privilege of reinventing the gallery's main space is Then One, an artist, designer, illustrator, and muralist who lives in northern New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Traditional, Modern, International" at Joan Perkes Fine Art is the commendable debut exhibition of a new gallery that opened its doors April 1 in a Lambertville neighborhood with a decidedly Cape May feel to it. From the start of this new venture, Perkes says, she was amazed at the phone calls she got from neighborhood people saying they had heard about her plans and wanted to know how they could help. Her enterprise was warmly welcomed as she set up shop in a large 1891 building where, once upon a time, spokes for automobile wheels were manufactured.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
The acceptance, and appreciation, of contemporary crafts have become increasingly more sophisticated in the United States. Decades ago the current level of public attention and sponsorship of craft activity would have been unimaginable; today that growth is almost beyond belief. Certain art galleries have assumed leadership; prominent collectors have bought works to a significant extent; museums are exhibiting recent pieces in a vast number of media, assisted by those collectors. In March and April, it's all about fiber, as the city plays host to Fiber Philadelphia, an international fiber-art extravaganza with exhibitions, events, lectures, and activities at more than 40 venues throughout the region.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren Otis Angle, 68, of South Philadelphia, exhibitions curator at the Fleisher Art Memorial for 16 years and an artist whose work often examined the balance between humans and nature, died of cancer Friday, Sept. 9, at home. Mr. Angle exhibited widely in solo and group shows in the United States and Italy. In 1983, Mr. Angle's work was selected for inclusion in a Wind Challenge Exhibit at Fleisher, an annual show featuring three regional artists chosen from hundreds of entries.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|