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Abkhazia

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NEWS
October 1, 1993 | Daily News wire services
TBILISI, GEORGIA SEPARATISTS NOW CONTROL ABKHAZIA Separatists took control of nearly all of Abkhazia yesterday, and government troops fought to keep a toehold in the region. The losses in Abkhazia are a humiliating defeat for Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze, who has said the region's fall could enflame secessionist movements across Georgia and the whole Caucasus region. Yesterday, his leadership also came under renewed attack from his arch- rival, former President Zviad Gamsakhurdia.
NEWS
August 12, 2008 | Inquirer wire services; GlobalSecurity.org
Why is Russia involved? Since many South Ossetians have obtained Russian citizenship (as have many in the other Georgian breakaway region of Abkhazia), Russia claims it is protecting its citizens by intervening against the Georgians. Russia also is using force against Georgia apparently to express its displeasure with efforts by Georgia to join NATO and with Western recognition of Kosovo's independence. What's at stake for the U.S.? Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili is pro-West and sent troops to aid the U.S. effort in Iraq.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
Ex-IMF chief questioned, freed PARIS - French police released former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn on Wednesday after nearly 30 hours in custody for questioning about a suspected hotel prostitution ring. Strauss-Kahn, 62, is expected to be summoned again next month by judges who will decide if there is enough evidence to press charges in the case, judicial officials said. The questioning renewed attention on the dalliances of Strauss-Kahn, a one-time French presidential hopeful whose political career all but ended last spring over a New York hotel maid's allegations that he sexually assaulted her. French police are investigating a suspected prostitution ring that has implicated police and other officials.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No children play on the streets of Senaki these days. Nearly all the youngsters have been evacuated to places where shelling isn't a constant threat, where cannon fire isn't part of the background noise, and where men don't build barricades to protect their streets. For that's what this city has been like for the last two weeks, as it has become one of the major battlegrounds in the latest civil war to ravage this tiny country in the Caucasian Mountains, once considered the prettiest and most pleasant republic in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Liam McDowall, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said he instructed his army yesterday to get ready to help guard Georgian railroads from rebels threatening to cut the vital supply lines. It was the strongest statement yet of Russia's commitment to get involved in Georgia, where leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze has been fighting two insurgencies. Russian troops and armored vehicles were patrolling roads last week along stretches of Georgian railroad affected by the civil war. The railway connects Black Sea ports to the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and landlocked Armenia.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
The Russia-Georgia cease-fire brokered by France's president is less than meets the eye. Its terms keep moving as the Russian army keeps moving. Russia has since occupied Gori (appropriately, Stalin's birthplace), effectively cutting Georgia in two. The road to the capital, Tbilisi, is open, but apparently Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin has temporarily chosen to seek his objectives through military pressure and Western acquiescence rather than by naked occupation. His objectives are clear.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Misha Dzhindzhikhasvili, Associated Press
TBILISI, Georgia - Georgia's new prime minister said Thursday he would move quickly to expand the cabinet's powers, a change that would take away even more influence from the ex-Soviet nation's beleaguered pro-Western president. Bidzina Ivanishvili, an eccentric billionaire philanthropist who has promised to repair broken ties with Russia, also slapped his bitter rival for living in the lavish presidential palace rather than a more modest residence. "The buildings that the Georgian president had had built for himself are more appropriate for a feudal lord than a demo–cracy," Ivanishvili said at a news conference.
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NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Misha Dzhindzhikhasvili, Associated Press
TBILISI, Georgia - Georgia's new prime minister said Thursday he would move quickly to expand the cabinet's powers, a change that would take away even more influence from the ex-Soviet nation's beleaguered pro-Western president. Bidzina Ivanishvili, an eccentric billionaire philanthropist who has promised to repair broken ties with Russia, also slapped his bitter rival for living in the lavish presidential palace rather than a more modest residence. "The buildings that the Georgian president had had built for himself are more appropriate for a feudal lord than a demo–cracy," Ivanishvili said at a news conference.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
Ex-IMF chief questioned, freed PARIS - French police released former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn on Wednesday after nearly 30 hours in custody for questioning about a suspected hotel prostitution ring. Strauss-Kahn, 62, is expected to be summoned again next month by judges who will decide if there is enough evidence to press charges in the case, judicial officials said. The questioning renewed attention on the dalliances of Strauss-Kahn, a one-time French presidential hopeful whose political career all but ended last spring over a New York hotel maid's allegations that he sexually assaulted her. French police are investigating a suspected prostitution ring that has implicated police and other officials.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
The Russia-Georgia cease-fire brokered by France's president is less than meets the eye. Its terms keep moving as the Russian army keeps moving. Russia has since occupied Gori (appropriately, Stalin's birthplace), effectively cutting Georgia in two. The road to the capital, Tbilisi, is open, but apparently Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin has temporarily chosen to seek his objectives through military pressure and Western acquiescence rather than by naked occupation. His objectives are clear.
NEWS
August 12, 2008 | Inquirer wire services; GlobalSecurity.org
Why is Russia involved? Since many South Ossetians have obtained Russian citizenship (as have many in the other Georgian breakaway region of Abkhazia), Russia claims it is protecting its citizens by intervening against the Georgians. Russia also is using force against Georgia apparently to express its displeasure with efforts by Georgia to join NATO and with Western recognition of Kosovo's independence. What's at stake for the U.S.? Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili is pro-West and sent troops to aid the U.S. effort in Iraq.
NEWS
January 26, 2004 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Mikhail Saakashvili, who led Georgia's peaceful "revolution of the roses," took office yesterday, renewing his pledge to root out corruption, and restore the economy and prestige of this down-on-its-heels former Soviet republic. Saakashvili, 36, a U.S.-educated lawyer, said in his inaugural address in front of the sun-swept national parliament that fighting the financial corruption that had infected virtually every level of Georgian society was his "most important task. " Saakashvili's inauguration took place on the same steps where two months earlier, carrying a rose, he led Georgians protesting fraudulent parliamentary elections.
NEWS
January 4, 2004 | By Alex Friedrich INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
It may be just a decrepit little country in the Caucasus, but Georgia will attract some serious Russian and American attention when it holds its presidential election today. Tbilisi city politician Mikhail Saakashvili has been a hero of the West ever since the day he grabbed a rose, led a storming of the Parliament, and forced the resignation of corrupt President Eduard Shevardnadze in November, after he was reelected in voting that was widely regarded as rigged. Now Saakashvili is practically a shoo-in to succeed Shevardnadze, and supporters say he will help pull his homeland out of poverty and build a democratic, pro-American country.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No children play on the streets of Senaki these days. Nearly all the youngsters have been evacuated to places where shelling isn't a constant threat, where cannon fire isn't part of the background noise, and where men don't build barricades to protect their streets. For that's what this city has been like for the last two weeks, as it has become one of the major battlegrounds in the latest civil war to ravage this tiny country in the Caucasian Mountains, once considered the prettiest and most pleasant republic in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Liam McDowall, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said he instructed his army yesterday to get ready to help guard Georgian railroads from rebels threatening to cut the vital supply lines. It was the strongest statement yet of Russia's commitment to get involved in Georgia, where leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze has been fighting two insurgencies. Russian troops and armored vehicles were patrolling roads last week along stretches of Georgian railroad affected by the civil war. The railway connects Black Sea ports to the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and landlocked Armenia.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | Daily News wire services
TBILISI, GEORGIA SEPARATISTS NOW CONTROL ABKHAZIA Separatists took control of nearly all of Abkhazia yesterday, and government troops fought to keep a toehold in the region. The losses in Abkhazia are a humiliating defeat for Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze, who has said the region's fall could enflame secessionist movements across Georgia and the whole Caucasus region. Yesterday, his leadership also came under renewed attack from his arch- rival, former President Zviad Gamsakhurdia.
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