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Abortion Rights

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NEWS
May 16, 1990 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proponent of abortion rights won a solid victory in the Democratic primary for a state Senate seat in Philadelphia yesterday and will face a strong Republican opponent of abortion in November. The candidate, Allyson Young Schwartz, 41, was a founder of the Elizabeth Blackwell Health Center, an abortion clinic in Center City. She will face incumbent Republican M. Joseph Rocks, a staunch foe of abortion, in the November election. Rocks was unopposed for his party's nomination.
NEWS
July 31, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abortion-rights advocates hoping to moderate the Republican Party's antiabortion plank conceded last night that the platform committee was unlikely to issue a minority report on the issue. Republicans who favor abortion rights needed 27 signatures from the 107-member committee to produce a minority report that would say the party welcomes those who support abortion rights. But Susan Cullman, cochairwoman of the Republican Pro-Choice Coalition, said that they had only about two-thirds of the required signatures and that it appeared unlikely they would get many more before the committee adopts the platform today.
NEWS
April 26, 2004 | By Anastasia Ustinov, Troy Graham and Alison Young INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of thousands of marchers streamed down Pennsylvania Avenue yesterday, chanting and waving signs supporting abortion rights. There were no official estimates of the size of the crowd, but the rally was huge, with people filling the grassy lawn of the National Mall from the Washington Monument to the Capitol. Organizers put attendance at one million people; the Associated Press reported that various police sources informally estimated the throng at 500,000 to 800,000. Gloria Steinem, the feminist writer and activist, called the march "the biggest in the history of the women's movement in this country," saying the turnout was far larger than a similar march in 1992 attended by an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 people.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Escalating the Republican Party's internal abortion feud, House Speaker Newt Gingrich and two leading social moderates yesterday dismissed the warning of a Christian right leader that the 1996 GOP ticket must oppose abortion rights. Their remarks were a rejoinder to Ralph Reed, executive director of the Christian Coalition. Reed warned Friday that religious conservative voters would not support the GOP ticket in 1996 if it included an abortion-rights candidate. "Pro-life and pro-family voters, a third of the electorate, will not support . . . a national ticket or a platform that does not share Ronald Reagan's belief in the sanctity of innocent human life," Reed said.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Whitman renewed her support yesterday for a ban on third-trimester abortions in New Jersey, resurrecting the issue ahead of her U.S. Senate bid, to the consternation of activists on both sides of the debate. The Republican governor made her position known after one of her supporters, State Sen. Joseph M. Kyrillos Jr. (R., Monmouth), proposed a bill this month to prohibit any physician from performing an abortion on a "viable" fetus, a term applied usually between the 21st and 24th week of pregnancy.
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a sign that Democrats again will make abortion a top issue in a New Jersey campaign, national abortion-rights advocates will begin advertising this weekend in support of reelecting U.S. Sen. Robert G. Torricelli. The nation's leading abortion-rights group, the National Abortion Rights Action League, will air radio commercials on behalf of Torricelli as part of a nationwide effort to keep the Senate in Democratic hands. The ads, NARAL director Kate Michelman said, are intended "to begin to alert voters in New Jersey that the right to choose is in danger and it is important to have a pro-choice Senate.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | By Carl M. Cannon, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Republicans who want their party to abandon its anti-abortion stance will meet today and may decide on some dramatic ways to address the controversial subject. One possibility under consideration is to run "favorite daughter" candidates against President Bush in next year's primaries. These candidates would not actually run against Bush - they would pledge to support him at the convention - but they would fight for a party platform that includes their views on abortion. "We are not party bashers," said Ann Stone, chairwoman of Republicans for Choice.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By Lem Lloyd, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
With the U.S. Supreme Court in a position to strike down the right to abortion, Planned Parenthood of Chester County announced Monday that it had formed a political arm to take the abortion battle to the electorate. Called Planned Parenthood Advocates, the newly formed group will team up with a statewide coalition, Republicans for Choice, to mobilize voters who support abortion rights. First, the two organizations will attempt to identify Chester County voters who support abortion rights for the April primary election.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Molly Yard thinks this may be the year. It may be, said Yard, the year that abortion-rights groups turn the tide against the anti-abortion lobby in this country. The year that Gov. Casey's staunch position against abortion may cost him a significant chunk of voter support. The year that state Rep. Stephen Freind'santi-abortion monarchy in Haverford Township may begin to crumble. Those were some of Yard's thoughts this week when the president of the National Organization for Women and 1933 Swarthmore College graduate spoke at Lang Concert Hall as part of the school's Social Action Week.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a potential blow to Republican Barbara Hafer's gubernatorial campaign, state Rep. Karen A. Ritter, the legislature's leading abortion-rights proponent, says she is not supporting Hafer. "While Barbara Hafer is pro-choice," Ritter said, "that's really about the only good thing I know about her. " She said that Hafer was conservative on other issues. "What I'd have to be doing (to support Hafer) is turn my back on everything else that's important to me," Ritter said. As an outgrowth of this feeling, Ritter has formed a political action committee for Democratic abortion-rights candidates - even though it could drain money from another PAC that is working for Hafer's election.
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NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz on Thursday said that all of her campaign contributions are reported so anybody can ask questions about who may be trying to influence her, but gubernatorial rival Tom Wolf's $4 million loan from M&T Bank is a different matter. There is no requirement for a candidate to report details of personal loans. Schwartz said the public should know because such a large obligation could constrain him as governor. "What's his relationship with that bank? Who is he indebted to?"
NEWS
January 24, 2014
FORTY-ONE years ago, women and their families secured a victory when the United States Supreme Court affirmed our right to safe and legal abortion. In Roe v. Wade, the court confirmed that the constitutionally protected right to privacy includes every woman's right to make her own personal medical decisions without the interference of politicians. Yet, the fight for a woman's ability to make her own reproductive decisions continues. Since 2010, when tea-party politicians were elected to legislatures across the country, we've seen an unprecedented assault designed to erode access to safe and legal abortion.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
A NEW study about abortion makes it clearer than ever that it's becoming a luxury that only the wealthy will be able to afford. New draconian state laws are forcing so many abortion facilities to close that only women who can afford to travel will be able to access the procedure. The Guttmacher Institute, a research and policy organization, has reported that more abortion restrictions were enacted in the United States in the past three years than during the previous decade. Some 22 states enacted 70 laws curtailing abortion rights last year alone.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
WENDY DAVIS, the Texas state legislator who hijacked the Senate floor for a few hours last month, is the new feminist icon. The woman who fought to keep abortions safe, legal and not necessarily rare deeply into the second trimester of pregnancy was ultimately unsuccessful in her crusade. Nonetheless, she cemented her status as "One Who Speaks For Us . " The " Us ," of course, is anyone with a set of ovaries. Another lady who assumed the heavy burden of our gender upon her slender shoulders was Sandra Fluke, the courageous Georgetown law student who raised her voice in solidarity with those who wanted the public to subsidize their sex lives.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Dr. Kermit Gosnell's conviction for killing three babies born alive has been cited around the country by politicians pushing for more abortion restrictions, supposedly to prevent further such atrocities. But passing more unnecessarily stringent laws may actually put more women in jeopardy by closing clinics and limiting access to safe and legal abortions. Lawmakers in several states have followed Pennsylvania's lead by subjecting abortion procedures and clinics to further restrictions that are more likely to shut down responsible providers than to improve patient safety.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis was filibustering an antiabortion bill on the floor of that state's legislature last month when her counterpart in New Jersey called her office. Barbara Buono, a Democratic state senator running against Republican Gov. Christie, tweeted a picture of herself calling Davis' office to send a message that she was "proud of her stand for women. " That contrasts with what happened three days later, when Christie's office issued a Friday news release to announce that he had quietly vetoed nearly $7.5 million in funding for family-planning services.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett is expected to sign a bill to prevent coverage of most abortions under policies offered in a federally run insurance marketplace starting next year in Pennsylvania, after the Senate passed it yesterday by a comfortable margin. A spokeswoman for Corbett, an opponent of abortion rights, said he will sign the bill. It passed the Senate, 31-19, and the House approved it in April, 144-53, but only after divisive debates. Critics said the bill expands restrictions on abortion rights and discriminates against poor women.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - Backers of a Republican-penned bill to prevent coverage of most abortions under policies offered in federal insurance marketplaces rebuffed two more attempts to change it yesterday. The state Senate rejected two amendments yesterday, including one to expand the exceptions to allow an abortion when a woman's health is at risk. A final vote is expected today. Opponents say the bill expands restrictions on abortion rights and discriminates against poor women. Proponents say it's in line with Pennsylvania's longstanding ban on taxpayer-funded elective abortions.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one on either side of the intractable abortion debate was sorry Monday to learn that Kermit Gosnell was found guilty of first-degree murder. And in their reactions to the verdict, both opponents of abortion and advocates for abortion rights agreed that the Gosnell case was indicative of a problem. They defined that problem, however, in completely different ways. Michael Ciccocioppo, executive director of the Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation, said in an e-mailed statement: "For the sake of all Gosnell's victims, let us never forget the rampant disregard for life that was allowed to continue for decades in our state.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | Inquirer Staff
Archbishop Charles Chaput, speaking for the first time since abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell was convicted of murder, said Tuesday the verdicts in the case "will surprise very few. " Although the church opposes capital punishment, Chaput in a statement said nothing about the possibility that Gosnell could be sentenced to death for his three first-degree murder convictions. The head of the archdiocese of Philadelphia instead focused mainly on the church's opposition to abortion.
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