FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After myriad faxes, legal jousts, sharp words and a news conference or two, Philadelphia and Florida have ended their war over who will charge Berto Ordaz with murdering his girlfriend and driving the body to a Miami suburb. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham threw in the towel and said Philadelphia would do it. She authorized city police to issue an arrest warrant for Ordaz, a North Philadelphia man who officials say drove his girlfriend's corpse south to Florida in January and left her body in his van in a Miami suburb.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Cynthia Burton and Ron Goldwyn contributed to this report
Republican Party leader William A. Meehan helped engineer Common Pleas Judge Lynne Abraham's election this week as interim district attorney by lobbying GOP judges to vote for her, sources said. Meanwhile, GOP mayoral candidate Ronald D. Castille said yesterday he'd "be pleased" to have Abraham, a Democrat, as the Republicans' nominee for DA this fall. Abraham was chosen DA Wednesday by the city's Board of Judges, and the party organizations will select candidates to run in a special election for district attorney in November.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham has announced a crackdown on "hate crimes," which community groups say are on the increase. "Pennsylvania state hate crimes legislation affords this office the opportunity in certain cases to add the charge of hate or bias to the charges in the original crimes," Abraham said. "Bias crimes in general come to the district attorney's office as part of other criminal conduct and have an additional legal context. " Abraham spoke Monday while announcing the assignment of Assistant DA Richard Block to act as liaison on bias- and hate-related crimes.
NEWS
December 30, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham, outraged over proposed cuts to her office's budget, slammed Mayor Street yesterday as a leader who lacks the courage and vision needed to stem the city's rising number of homicides. "Do something!" Abraham burst out at a news conference in comments directed at the mayor. "You know, stop switching around and changing programs and not having the courage to call up the district attorney and say, 'Lynne, what do you think we ought to do?' "He's the only mayor in Philadelphia history who hasn't called the district attorney up and said, 'Lynne, we have a crime problem.
NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham wants you to know that she stands, personally, between the citizens of Philadelphia and mayhem on the streets. "Trust me when I tell you. We're on the case," Abraham said recently at a meeting of the Wissinoming Civic Association in a church basement. As she seeks reelection to a fourth full term, Abraham, 64, already is the longest-serving district attorney in 80 years. She is running amid an upsurge in gun-related homicides, facing criticism that her office cannot seem to improve the rate of dismissal of felony arrests.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Roger King, 72, a towering figure in Philadelphia law enforcement during a decades-long career as a top homicide prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office, died Wednesday morning, Aug. 24, in hospice care in Wyndmoor. The cause of death was metastatic kidney cancer, said his wife, Sharon Wainright. He had battled the disease for two years. "Roger had a heart of gold," Wainright said. "He was very proud of the work that he had done. " Mr. King spent three decades prosecuting homicides in Philadelphia, including some of the city's most notorious cases, such as the conviction of David Dickson Jr., a former Drexel University security guard with a foot fetish who strangled a 20-year-old student in 1984.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
On City Hall's sixth floor, in the low light and the haze of cigarette smoke, court criers, lawyers and reporters clustered near the entrance of Court Room 643, craning to hear the Board of Judges meeting inside. There was spontaneous applause, the doors flew open, and emerging into a flood of TV lights was Common Pleas Court Judge Lynne M. Abraham. With a crooked smile and a raspy voice, Abraham told the crowd that she had been selected - by a very narrow margin - to be Philadelphia's district attorney.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | Chris Hepp and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Former Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham collapsed during the first televised mayoral debate Tuesday night, casting a pall over the event and the future of her campaign. Abraham, 74, crumpled to the floor seven minutes into the hour-long debate at the Kimmel Center. As she lay motionless at the base of her lectern, other candidates and the debate moderator, NBC10 anchor Jim Rosenfield, rushed to her aid. Someone called out, "Is there a doctor in the house?" After a few minutes, Abraham began moving and tried to sit up, telling those around her, "I'm all right.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynne M. Abraham was feeling great. She had just lost the Democratic mayoral primary, but she was relentlessly upbeat. After a long day, a long six months, Abraham shook hands, flashed wide grins, and said she "had a wonderful day," and "was proud of the campaign we ran. " Though the former district attorney, famously described by Mayor Frank L. Rizzo as "one tough cookie," finished a distant third behind James F. Kenney and State Sen. Anthony...
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham said last night that her office has received upward of 200 calls from males claiming they had sex with AIDS- infected businessman Edward I. Savitz without using condoms. Speaking on ABC's Nightline, Abraham appeared to contradict earlier comments by the city health commissioner that Savitz poses less of a public health threat than orginally thought because he reportedly insisted that the youths wear condoms. Dr. Robert K. Ross had said Monday that a majority of 100 teenagers calling a city AIDS hotline to report encounters with Savitz described contacts that did not involve sexual intercourse.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The candidate was a woman of a certain age in a hard-fought campaign, and when she fainted in public, the pundits - mostly men - were unrelenting. No, not Hillary Clinton. We're talking about Philadelphia's storied "one tough cookie" - Lynne M. Abraham, the former district attorney who fainted under the lights during the first televised mayoral debate in April 2015. "I was watching and saw it and said, 'Hey, the same thing happened to me!' " Abraham said Monday, referring to the TV coverage of Clinton, 68, appearing to collapse as she got into a car at the Sept.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Roger King, 72, a towering figure in Philadelphia law enforcement during a decades-long career as a top homicide prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office, died Wednesday morning, Aug. 24, in hospice care in Wyndmoor. The cause of death was metastatic kidney cancer, said his wife, Sharon Wainright. He had battled the disease for two years. "Roger had a heart of gold," Wainright said. "He was very proud of the work that he had done. " Mr. King spent three decades prosecuting homicides in Philadelphia, including some of the city's most notorious cases, such as the conviction of David Dickson Jr., a former Drexel University security guard with a foot fetish who strangled a 20-year-old student in 1984.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
ISSUE | JUDGE SHAPIRO A true trailblazer It is unfortunate that Senior U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro died just a few days before the Democrats made history by being the first major party to nominate a woman candidate for president of the United States ("Norma Shapiro; pioneering set prison cap," Saturday). Judge Shapiro made history, too. Graduating in 1951 from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, she was a token woman in a man's profession. Her career of firsts was significant, including: first female partner at the Dechert law firm, first woman judge in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, first woman member and chair of the Philadelphia Bar Association board of governors, and first recipient of the Bar's Sandra Day O'Connor Award.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
U.S. District Senior Judge Norma Shapiro, 87, of Penn Valley, a pioneering jurist in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, died Friday, July 22, at Lankenau Hospital of natural causes. The first female judge in the federal court district made up of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, Judge Shapiro was nominated to the court by President Jimmy Carter in August 1978. Though she had not been at work for a few months, she had been planning to return to her duties on the bench, her family said.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane prepares to talk for the first time with reporters about the criminal charges against her, one well-known former prosecutor is offering to replace her temporarily if she steps down. Kane said Monday that she would hold a news conference Wednesday afternoon in Harrisburg. She has said through her lawyer and a spokesman that she is not guilty and has no plans to quit. But that hasn't stopped talk of replacing her. If she quit, naming an interim attorney general would be up to Gov. Wolf, who wants her out, and on Monday, Philadelphia's Democratic Party chairman, U.S. Rep. Robert Brady, said a would-be replacement contacted him last week: former Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TONY FULWOOD had tears in his eyes when he walked into Frank Rizzo's hospital room and saw the mayor in the bed with a broken leg. Tony felt responsible for the injury, even though it was an accident and even though he was doing his job of protecting the mayor when an explosion rocked the Arco refinery in a nine-alarm fire in 1976, and he fell on Rizzo to protect him from the blast. "I hope you're not upset with me," Tony blubbered. "I wish I was in that bed instead of you. " "You know, Tony," Rizzo said.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynne M. Abraham was feeling great. She had just lost the Democratic mayoral primary, but she was relentlessly upbeat. After a long day, a long six months, Abraham shook hands, flashed wide grins, and said she "had a wonderful day," and "was proud of the campaign we ran. " Though the former district attorney, famously described by Mayor Frank L. Rizzo as "one tough cookie," finished a distant third behind James F. Kenney and State Sen. Anthony...
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | Chris Brennan & Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
They're not altogether wild about the choice of Philadelphia mayoral candidates on Tuesday's Democratic ballot. They're glad for a lack of "mudslinging" so far, as one put it. Some are wary of candidates' ties to unions, donors, or City Hall. And some just haven't decided. A handful of the 600 registered Democrats interviewed in the poll commissioned by The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com, and NBC10 spoke with Inquirer reporters this week. Here are some of their comments.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic mayoral candidate Lynne M. Abraham made good on a pledge at Monday night's debate and released three more years of her personal tax records Tuesday. They showed just what she said they would: that her financial dealings in those years varied little from those reported in her 2013 return, which she had already made public at The Inquirer's request. In releasing her federal tax returns for 2010, 2011, and 2012, she went one better than four of her opponents, who, at the request of The Inquirer, released three years of returns, 2011 through 2013.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Lynne M. Abraham was walking through the City Hall courtyard not long after launching her bid to become Philadelphia's mayor, a woman popped up to thank her for attending an anticrime "national night out" years ago. Abraham looked at her. "Sprague Street," she said. After two decades as Philadelphia district attorney, Abraham long ago acquired the politician's skill of remembering almost everyone. And most everyone knows her, too. She is the grandmotherly presence with the shock of white hair, the strong jaw, and the just-us-folks directness.
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