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Abraham Zapruder

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BUSINESS
July 7, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
labor GM, Auto Workers under gun to settle General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers are under intense pressure to settle this week the two strikes that have crippled the world's largest automaker. The strikes by 9,200 workers at two parts plants in Flint, Mich., began a month ago and cost the automaker $1.2 billion in second-quarter profit. The walkouts shuttered 26 of its 29 North American assembly plants, idling 162,000 workers. A settlement by midweek would allow GM to begin the complex process of restarting plants by Monday, the end of its annual two-week summer vacation.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS THE 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK nears, we have "Parkland," a docudrama that reimagines the whole thing as an episode of "ER. " The movie concentrates on events of Nov. 22, 1963, at Dallas' Parkland Hospital, where President Kennedy was taken after being shot. It plays like a standard emergency-room drama - an overmatched young resident (Zac Efron) an efficient and compassionate nurse (Marcia Gay Harden) and a take-charge senior physician (Colin Hanks). The dynamics are repeated soon after, when the president's assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, is himself shot, and the same doctors attend to his wounds, amid the same sort of ER crash-cart hubbub.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon you'll be able to buy a video of one of the most horrifying scenes in American history, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and view it in the comfort of your living room. Remote in hand, you can use the rewind, freeze-frame and slow-mo on the historic 26-second home movie shot Nov. 22, 1963, by Dallas dress manufacturer Abraham Zapruder as he stood on a concrete parapet to see over the crowd in Dealey Plaza. A digitally improved version of Zapruder's 8-millimeter silent film is being released this week as a $19.98 videocassette by MPI Home Video, of Orland Park, Ill. Painstakingly rephotographed from the original film, the new Image of an Assassination is sharper than previously-seen bootleg and second-generation copies.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Up a flight of carpeted stairs and through the master bedroom is a closetlike space the width of a pair of outstretched arms. On the not-so-far wall is a four-foot-wide blueprint of Dealey Plaza, site of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. On it are the names of 286 "selected witnesses," their locations marked by little numbered circles. The position of the president's motorcade, frozen before the first shot was fired. The moment of the killing in precise engineering detail. "This is the kind of psychosis that goes on here," said Michael Conaway, laughing as he pointed at the map. "It's supposed to be a bathroom," he said, scanning shelves packed with videos and books.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blurry home movie filmed by a man named Abraham Zapruder is their Holy Bible. They watch it over and over again, with blow-ups and freeze frames, counting the gun shots, calculating the bullet trajectories. Their demons are many. They include the Warren Commission report, its "single bullet" and "lone assassin" theories and a cast of characters ranging from U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) to Lyndon B. Johnson. They speculate about plots within plots, government cover-ups, doctored photographs, forged identities and a missing brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | By Tom Shales, Special to the Daily News
"The Story Behind the Story" is lamentable, problematical, and maybe even deplorable. But it's also pretty darn good. Television is full of these pesky anomalies. They help keep it young. What's troubling about the show is that it's a news program produced by NBC's entertainment division out in silly Hollywood. Indeed, it's really a revised version of the laborious NBC News series "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" that aired a few times last year. Brandon Tartikoff, the NBC Entertainment president who does lots of dabbling in the news department, admitted that "Y,T&T," as it came to be called, was a big disappointment to him, especially since it was his idea to do the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
More than 25 years after the fact, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy still provides fertile ground for conspiracy theorists. Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Soviet agent? An assassin sent by Fidel Castro? A pawn of organized crime? A deluded personality acting on his own? Such questions may never be answered, but their validity is made strikingly clear in a documentary from White Star Video called Reasonable Doubt (51 minutes, $29.95). Produced by Chip Selby in 1988 (the 25th anniversary of the slaying)
NEWS
August 9, 1999
Living behind masks in order to accept ourselves Lewis Whittington's negative treatment of Eyes Wide Shut is a perfect example of Stanley Kubrick's point (Commentary, Aug. 2). Eyes is about how we live behind the masks that we create because of our inability to accept things about ourselves that we consider too negative or too shameful to allow into our consciousness. In the movie, the protagonist (Tom Cruise) lives by a myth he has created regarding his own sexual feelings. When his wife (Nicole Kidman)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
House Speaker Newt Gingrich would undoubtedly cast his ballot for the 1938 orphanage inspirational Boys Town. Elliot Shelkrot, president of the Free Library of Philadelphia, says he'd nominate Harold and Maude, the 1972 black comedy about the love affair between teenager Bud Cort and septuagenarian Ruth Gordon, "because it broke all kinds of taboos - in a lighthearted way, but with a serious intergenerational message. " Oscar-nominated documentarian Lise Yasui would opt for Days of Heaven, citing Terrence Malick's 1978 farm drama with Richard Gere and Linda Manz "for its gorgeous cinematography and the perspective of its young girl narrator.
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NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS THE 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK nears, we have "Parkland," a docudrama that reimagines the whole thing as an episode of "ER. " The movie concentrates on events of Nov. 22, 1963, at Dallas' Parkland Hospital, where President Kennedy was taken after being shot. It plays like a standard emergency-room drama - an overmatched young resident (Zac Efron) an efficient and compassionate nurse (Marcia Gay Harden) and a take-charge senior physician (Colin Hanks). The dynamics are repeated soon after, when the president's assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, is himself shot, and the same doctors attend to his wounds, amid the same sort of ER crash-cart hubbub.
NEWS
August 9, 1999
Living behind masks in order to accept ourselves Lewis Whittington's negative treatment of Eyes Wide Shut is a perfect example of Stanley Kubrick's point (Commentary, Aug. 2). Eyes is about how we live behind the masks that we create because of our inability to accept things about ourselves that we consider too negative or too shameful to allow into our consciousness. In the movie, the protagonist (Tom Cruise) lives by a myth he has created regarding his own sexual feelings. When his wife (Nicole Kidman)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon you'll be able to buy a video of one of the most horrifying scenes in American history, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and view it in the comfort of your living room. Remote in hand, you can use the rewind, freeze-frame and slow-mo on the historic 26-second home movie shot Nov. 22, 1963, by Dallas dress manufacturer Abraham Zapruder as he stood on a concrete parapet to see over the crowd in Dealey Plaza. A digitally improved version of Zapruder's 8-millimeter silent film is being released this week as a $19.98 videocassette by MPI Home Video, of Orland Park, Ill. Painstakingly rephotographed from the original film, the new Image of an Assassination is sharper than previously-seen bootleg and second-generation copies.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
labor GM, Auto Workers under gun to settle General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers are under intense pressure to settle this week the two strikes that have crippled the world's largest automaker. The strikes by 9,200 workers at two parts plants in Flint, Mich., began a month ago and cost the automaker $1.2 billion in second-quarter profit. The walkouts shuttered 26 of its 29 North American assembly plants, idling 162,000 workers. A settlement by midweek would allow GM to begin the complex process of restarting plants by Monday, the end of its annual two-week summer vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
House Speaker Newt Gingrich would undoubtedly cast his ballot for the 1938 orphanage inspirational Boys Town. Elliot Shelkrot, president of the Free Library of Philadelphia, says he'd nominate Harold and Maude, the 1972 black comedy about the love affair between teenager Bud Cort and septuagenarian Ruth Gordon, "because it broke all kinds of taboos - in a lighthearted way, but with a serious intergenerational message. " Oscar-nominated documentarian Lise Yasui would opt for Days of Heaven, citing Terrence Malick's 1978 farm drama with Richard Gere and Linda Manz "for its gorgeous cinematography and the perspective of its young girl narrator.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Up a flight of carpeted stairs and through the master bedroom is a closetlike space the width of a pair of outstretched arms. On the not-so-far wall is a four-foot-wide blueprint of Dealey Plaza, site of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. On it are the names of 286 "selected witnesses," their locations marked by little numbered circles. The position of the president's motorcade, frozen before the first shot was fired. The moment of the killing in precise engineering detail. "This is the kind of psychosis that goes on here," said Michael Conaway, laughing as he pointed at the map. "It's supposed to be a bathroom," he said, scanning shelves packed with videos and books.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
More than 25 years after the fact, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy still provides fertile ground for conspiracy theorists. Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Soviet agent? An assassin sent by Fidel Castro? A pawn of organized crime? A deluded personality acting on his own? Such questions may never be answered, but their validity is made strikingly clear in a documentary from White Star Video called Reasonable Doubt (51 minutes, $29.95). Produced by Chip Selby in 1988 (the 25th anniversary of the slaying)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | By Tom Shales, Special to the Daily News
"The Story Behind the Story" is lamentable, problematical, and maybe even deplorable. But it's also pretty darn good. Television is full of these pesky anomalies. They help keep it young. What's troubling about the show is that it's a news program produced by NBC's entertainment division out in silly Hollywood. Indeed, it's really a revised version of the laborious NBC News series "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" that aired a few times last year. Brandon Tartikoff, the NBC Entertainment president who does lots of dabbling in the news department, admitted that "Y,T&T," as it came to be called, was a big disappointment to him, especially since it was his idea to do the show.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blurry home movie filmed by a man named Abraham Zapruder is their Holy Bible. They watch it over and over again, with blow-ups and freeze frames, counting the gun shots, calculating the bullet trajectories. Their demons are many. They include the Warren Commission report, its "single bullet" and "lone assassin" theories and a cast of characters ranging from U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) to Lyndon B. Johnson. They speculate about plots within plots, government cover-ups, doctored photographs, forged identities and a missing brain.
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