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NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelo J. Errichetti, 84, a former Camden mayor and state senator who was South Jersey's premier Democratic power broker in the decade before his 1981 bribery conviction in the Abscam scandal, has died after a long illness. He had been living in Ventnor, N.J. During two mayoral terms, starting in 1973, he built a reputation as an unflagging booster for his hometown, where his father, a Neapolitan immigrant, stoked coal at the shipyard to feed seven children. Mr. Errichetti's efforts to revive Camden's moribund economy were said to occupy 12 hours on a typical day, yet he took on a second office simultaneously.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Walter Phillips was chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency
The House Judiciary Committee's rejection of the most recent bill calling for the merit selection of judges caused me to reflect on our system of electing judges in Pennsylvania, and why I have chosen not to put myself through the ordeal that candidates for the state judiciary have to endure in order to take a place on the bench. It also made me think back to a swearing-in of a Common Pleas Court judge I attended in Philadelphia several months ago. The swearing-in was for a successful candidate in last fall's election, an attorney with 25 years' experience in the District Attorney's Office, someone who is bright and honest, and exercises good judgment; in other words, someone who deserves to be on the bench.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Reity O'Brien and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Reity O’Brien and Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Logue, 88, of Wynnewood, an accountant and decorated World War II veteran, died Wednesday, Nov. 30, of an apparent heart attack at home. Mr. Logue grew up in Southwest Philadelphia, where he delivered newspapers and played the bugle for the Archer-Epler Drum and Bugle Corps. He graduated from West Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. During World War II, Mr. Logue served in the Army with the 83d "Thunderbolt" Infantry Division. On June 18, 1944, he landed on Omaha Beach.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge John Fullam, who presided over such notable cases as the Abscam political-corruption probe and the landmark bankruptcy of Penn Central, said Wednesday that he planned to step down. "I plan to retire as of April 15," said Fullam, who was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. "I will no longer be taking cases," he told The Inquirer, "but I will finish up what I have on my plate. " Asked about his retirement plans, Fullam quipped: "I hope to continue to breathe.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge John Fullam, who presided over such notable cases as the Abscam political-corruption probe and the landmark bankruptcy of Penn Central, said Wednesday that he planned to step down. "I plan to retire as of April 15," said Fullam, who was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. "I will no longer be taking cases," he told The Inquirer, "but I will finish up what I have on my plate. " Asked about his retirement plans, Fullam quipped: "I hope to continue to breathe.
NEWS
March 28, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis and George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Former City Council President George X. Schwartz was a dominating political force in Philadelphia for two decades. Until his conviction in 1980 in the FBI Abscam corruption sting, he wielded power and smoked big cigars with equal flair. Mr. Schwartz, 95, died Friday at home in the William Penn House near Rittenhouse Square. His son, William G. Schwartz, said his father had been hospitalized five weeks ago with pneumonia and fluid in his lungs. As family and friends gather for his funeral today they will remember the legacy of a man who doted on family, constituents, and the city he served as a councilman and ward leader, but also the legacy that ended in one of the nation's more controversial political-corruption investigations.
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