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Abscam

NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Reity O’Brien and Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Logue, 88, of Wynnewood, an accountant and decorated World War II veteran, died Wednesday, Nov. 30, of an apparent heart attack at home. Mr. Logue grew up in Southwest Philadelphia, where he delivered newspapers and played the bugle for the Archer-Epler Drum and Bugle Corps. He graduated from West Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. During World War II, Mr. Logue served in the Army with the 83d "Thunderbolt" Infantry Division. On June 18, 1944, he landed on Omaha Beach.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge John Fullam, who presided over such notable cases as the Abscam political-corruption probe and the landmark bankruptcy of Penn Central, said Wednesday that he planned to step down. "I plan to retire as of April 15," said Fullam, who was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. "I will no longer be taking cases," he told The Inquirer, "but I will finish up what I have on my plate. " Asked about his retirement plans, Fullam quipped: "I hope to continue to breathe.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge John Fullam, who presided over such notable cases as the Abscam political-corruption probe and the landmark bankruptcy of Penn Central, said Wednesday that he planned to step down. "I plan to retire as of April 15," said Fullam, who was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. "I will no longer be taking cases," he told The Inquirer, "but I will finish up what I have on my plate. " Asked about his retirement plans, Fullam quipped: "I hope to continue to breathe.
NEWS
March 28, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis and George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Former City Council President George X. Schwartz was a dominating political force in Philadelphia for two decades. Until his conviction in 1980 in the FBI Abscam corruption sting, he wielded power and smoked big cigars with equal flair. Mr. Schwartz, 95, died Friday at home in the William Penn House near Rittenhouse Square. His son, William G. Schwartz, said his father had been hospitalized five weeks ago with pneumonia and fluid in his lungs. As family and friends gather for his funeral today they will remember the legacy of a man who doted on family, constituents, and the city he served as a councilman and ward leader, but also the legacy that ended in one of the nation's more controversial political-corruption investigations.
NEWS
March 27, 2010 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George X. Schwartz, 95, former president of City Council whose political career ended in an Abscam extortion and conspiracy conviction in 1980, died yesterday. Mr. Schwartz was one of the dominant players in city politics for more than 20 years, wielding tremendous power and influence as both a private attorney and city councilman and ward leader. But he was one of more than a half-dozen local officials caught in the FBI Abscam sting, one of the more controversial political corruption investigations in the nation's history.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
City Council wants to rename the Philadelphia Navy Yard in honor of the late U.S. Rep. John Murtha. This may seem like a fitting tribute for a city known for patronage and pay-to-play. But it is hardly in the best interest of taxpayers. Granted, Murtha, who died last month, spent a lifetime serving his country. He joined the Marine Corps during the Korean War and served in Vietnam. Murtha went on to serve 19 terms in Congress. But right there with "longtime congressman" in his Washington Post obituary headline was this phrase: "master of pork-barrel politics.
NEWS
December 2, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raymond F. Lederer, 70, a quintessential Philadelphia blue-collar Democratic politician who lost his congressional seat after he was ensnared in the FBI's Abscam investigation, died yesterday of cancer in the Fishtown home where he had spent his childhood. Mr. Lederer had been diagnosed with lung cancer in June, said Richard Dickson, his former congressional intern and a close friend. "He was just a very decent guy, unassuming," said David B. Glancey, a former Philadelphia Democratic Party chairman.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2008 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lawyer representing news anchor Alycia Lane in her battle with CBS3 has long experience handling high-profile cases where professional reputations and plenty of money are at stake. Paul R. Rosen also is known as a fierce advocate for his clients, stretching back to his days representing a defendant in the Abscam political-corruption case. He represented the Lower Merion Township Commissioners in their lawsuit against former Barnes Foundation board member Richard H. Glanton, who accused the panel of racism for opposing the Barnes' expansion plans.
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