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Absecon Lighthouse

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Jean Muchanic is no ship's captain, but she decided that her charge, the Absecon Lighthouse, needed a few more nautical accoutrements. So last year, Muchanic, executive director of the Inlet Public/Private Association, which runs the lighthouse, became an interfaith minister. "I can perform weddings and civil-union ceremonies, which at this beautiful lighthouse is a wonderful thing," said Muchanic. "Just another reason to come off the Boardwalk and a little bit north to see us. " The lighthouse, the tallest in New Jersey at 171 feet and 228 steps, is celebrating its 150th birthday guarding Absecon Island shores.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As twilight descended yesterday and the brilliant lights of neighboring casinos shimmered nearby, a single beacon beamed again from atop the 140-year-old Absecon Lighthouse, which had stood dark for 16 years. "This is really, really special for me," said Gregory Foran, 9, of Sicklerville, who, as the great-great-grandson of the lighthouse's last keeper, was honored with the task of pulling the switch that relighted the beacon just after 5 p.m. The event was special, too, to thousands of lighthouse enthusiasts throughout the country, said Wayne Wheeler, president of the San Francisco-based United States Lighthouse Society, a 10,000-member-strong organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite what many of us say, that we are going to the Shore to lie limp on the beach, the truth is that few of us can actually stick to true sand-and-surf nothingness for any length of time. Fortunately, the Jersey Shore has a slew of other options, many of them free or of moderate cost. Almost every Shore town has its share of miniature golf, for instance. (Though strangely, Absecon Island, from Atlantic City to Longport, is pretty much devoid of mini-golf.) You can find a half-dozen courses in Cape May and twice that many in the Wildwoods, but if you are looking for the epicenter of miniature golf at the Shore, go to 18th Street just west of Long Beach Boulevard in Beach Haven.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The seaward view may be the only thing that hasn't changed - that, and the old building itself. The Atlantic still winks and gleams, as it did 137 years ago when an Army colonel first oversaw the construction of a tower that would save countless tons of cargo and human lives. Fat clouds still tumble over the horizon, and, just within sight, an occasional sail still billows in the winds that powered commerce for years off the Jersey Shore. That view is unchanged. But just about everything else has. The pine- and dune-dappled land that once rolled out from the base of the Absecon Lighthouse now is dotted with buildings and cars and buses.
NEWS
January 1, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in 80 years, the historic Barnegat Lighthouse will provide a beacon for mariners off New Jersey's coast when a new $15,000 Fresnel lens is lit tonight. Thousands of people are expected for the New Year's Day event, which will begin with the lighting at 5 p.m. and proceed in a rather low-key manner with a few speeches and a chorus of bagpipes. Local officials had hoped to provide fireworks but couldn't get state approval. "The new light will really be the star of the show," said Angelo Rinaldi, president of the Friends of Barnegat Lighthouse, which raised about $35,000 for the new lens and replacement of 48 windows, which had become scratched and discolored over the 50 years since the panes were last replaced.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
When Jean Muchanic started nearly three years ago as the executive director of the Absecon Lighthouse, her father came by to see what was up. "It was February and he decided he wanted to climb to the top of the lighthouse," said Muchanic. "My father was 79 and was taking his time going up, but we kept hearing maybe three or four voices talking and laughing above us. "There are six levels and we stopped at every level so he could rest, but we kept hearing the voices," said Muchanic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Time was when Cape May businesses would hardly recognize that Atlantic City existed, and even if they did, it would be to turn up their haughty Victorian noses, pinching them to say the least, at their northern neighbor. Times, though, are changing in the new, moving-on-up Atlantic City, so the Great American Trolley Company from Cape May has bought in - now in its fourth summer of running Atlantic City Trolley Tours. Each Monday through Wednesday throughout the summer, Great American picks up passengers in its white, cable-car-like trolleys at five locations around Atlantic City, with tours of primarily Atlantic City venues.
NEWS
November 13, 2002 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How many "Coasties" does it take to change a lightbulb? The punch line wasn't much of a joke to the eight members of the Coast Guard yesterday who had spent an arduous two days inside the 143-year-old Cape May Lighthouse updating its beacon. "A little more than changing a lightbulb certainly went into this," said Chief Electrician's Mate Brandon Pfeilmeier, who led the team. "It was quite a bit of work. " There isn't much room at the top of the eight-story-tall brick spire, where the crew worked for more than 11 hours on Monday and seven more yesterday standing on a small circular catwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
FANS OF A LADY looking for love on television and oft-shirtless, blandly attractive men: Get thyselves to Atlantic City. "The Bachelorette," now in its ninth season, is filming in A.C. all week. Desiree Hartsock , who was rejected by Sean Lowe on the last season of "The Bachelor," now has the upper hand in the war of the roses. My spies gave me the scoop on where they're all heading. The cast started shooting Monday and is staying at Revel, the fancy-schmancy casino that recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 1850s, a young U.S. Army engineer from Philadelphia, George Gordon Meade, was asked to figure out how to stop so many of the still-young nation's merchant fleet from crashing into the coastline, jeopardizing lives and cargo. Although he supervised the construction and renovation of lighthouses all over, he's primarily known for his New Jersey handiwork. Meade, who would later lead the Union forces at Gettysburg, had noted that the Shore's lighthouses and beacons tended to be insufficient in number, location and, most of all, height.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
FANS OF A LADY looking for love on television and oft-shirtless, blandly attractive men: Get thyselves to Atlantic City. "The Bachelorette," now in its ninth season, is filming in A.C. all week. Desiree Hartsock , who was rejected by Sean Lowe on the last season of "The Bachelor," now has the upper hand in the war of the roses. My spies gave me the scoop on where they're all heading. The cast started shooting Monday and is staying at Revel, the fancy-schmancy casino that recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
NEWS
January 1, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in 80 years, the historic Barnegat Lighthouse will provide a beacon for mariners off New Jersey's coast when a new $15,000 Fresnel lens is lit tonight. Thousands of people are expected for the New Year's Day event, which will begin with the lighting at 5 p.m. and proceed in a rather low-key manner with a few speeches and a chorus of bagpipes. Local officials had hoped to provide fireworks but couldn't get state approval. "The new light will really be the star of the show," said Angelo Rinaldi, president of the Friends of Barnegat Lighthouse, which raised about $35,000 for the new lens and replacement of 48 windows, which had become scratched and discolored over the 50 years since the panes were last replaced.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Time was when Cape May businesses would hardly recognize that Atlantic City existed, and even if they did, it would be to turn up their haughty Victorian noses, pinching them to say the least, at their northern neighbor. Times, though, are changing in the new, moving-on-up Atlantic City, so the Great American Trolley Company from Cape May has bought in - now in its fourth summer of running Atlantic City Trolley Tours. Each Monday through Wednesday throughout the summer, Great American picks up passengers in its white, cable-car-like trolleys at five locations around Atlantic City, with tours of primarily Atlantic City venues.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
When Jean Muchanic started nearly three years ago as the executive director of the Absecon Lighthouse, her father came by to see what was up. "It was February and he decided he wanted to climb to the top of the lighthouse," said Muchanic. "My father was 79 and was taking his time going up, but we kept hearing maybe three or four voices talking and laughing above us. "There are six levels and we stopped at every level so he could rest, but we kept hearing the voices," said Muchanic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Jean Muchanic is no ship's captain, but she decided that her charge, the Absecon Lighthouse, needed a few more nautical accoutrements. So last year, Muchanic, executive director of the Inlet Public/Private Association, which runs the lighthouse, became an interfaith minister. "I can perform weddings and civil-union ceremonies, which at this beautiful lighthouse is a wonderful thing," said Muchanic. "Just another reason to come off the Boardwalk and a little bit north to see us. " The lighthouse, the tallest in New Jersey at 171 feet and 228 steps, is celebrating its 150th birthday guarding Absecon Island shores.
NEWS
November 13, 2002 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How many "Coasties" does it take to change a lightbulb? The punch line wasn't much of a joke to the eight members of the Coast Guard yesterday who had spent an arduous two days inside the 143-year-old Cape May Lighthouse updating its beacon. "A little more than changing a lightbulb certainly went into this," said Chief Electrician's Mate Brandon Pfeilmeier, who led the team. "It was quite a bit of work. " There isn't much room at the top of the eight-story-tall brick spire, where the crew worked for more than 11 hours on Monday and seven more yesterday standing on a small circular catwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 1850s, a young U.S. Army engineer from Philadelphia, George Gordon Meade, was asked to figure out how to stop so many of the still-young nation's merchant fleet from crashing into the coastline, jeopardizing lives and cargo. Although he supervised the construction and renovation of lighthouses all over, he's primarily known for his New Jersey handiwork. Meade, who would later lead the Union forces at Gettysburg, had noted that the Shore's lighthouses and beacons tended to be insufficient in number, location and, most of all, height.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite what many of us say, that we are going to the Shore to lie limp on the beach, the truth is that few of us can actually stick to true sand-and-surf nothingness for any length of time. Fortunately, the Jersey Shore has a slew of other options, many of them free or of moderate cost. Almost every Shore town has its share of miniature golf, for instance. (Though strangely, Absecon Island, from Atlantic City to Longport, is pretty much devoid of mini-golf.) You can find a half-dozen courses in Cape May and twice that many in the Wildwoods, but if you are looking for the epicenter of miniature golf at the Shore, go to 18th Street just west of Long Beach Boulevard in Beach Haven.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Through 142 years of severe storms, whipping winds and conflicting currents, the Absecon Lighthouse has stood tall. Its beacon, long darkened by technology and economics, will shine again this weekend despite - or perhaps because of - a devastating fire 14 months ago that destroyed an outbuilding that was key in its redevelopment. The fire happened just weeks before a grand reopening celebration was planned for the lighthouse. "We want to let people know we are still here," says Sara Cureton, executive director of the Inlet Public/Private Association, of the daylong Absecon Lighthouse Fall Fest scheduled for Sunday, which will culminate in the relighting of the beacon.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the catch-as-catch-can landscape of this town, the gray, granite Carnegie Library has always stood out in a crowd of glittery hotels and honky-tonk attractions. So, in a place better known for slot machines and diving horses than for monuments to knowledge and literacy, the 1904 structure is sure to garner much attention when a project to restore it, estimated to cost $4.5 million, gets under way. The building will be transformed into a satellite campus and conference center for Rutgers University's School of Business.
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