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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
For more than a decade, Thomas Nozkowski has been affirming the viability of abstraction in a quiet, determined manner. In the process, he has not only built up a body of work that other artists respect, he has proved that Kandinsky's seminal concepts of abstraction still have a lot of life left in them. The Beaver College Art Gallery has organized an exhibition that looks at Nozkowski's work over the last 10 years, not only to examine how it has developed but to show how it has maintained a fundamental consistency.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
AMONG the paintings in the recent "Karmic Abstraction" show at Bridgette Mayer Gallery was a large piece by Ryan McGinness. An art-world star - the New York Times says so - his work hangs in respected institutions like the Museum of Modern Art and Spain's MUSAC. He's kind of a big deal. McGinness had other works in the show, but let's focus on one: "Untitled (Black Hole, Black 72.1). " On a black background, neon squiggles race in and out of each other as if created by some cosmic Spirograph.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
It's clearly a sign of the times that "Post Painterly Abstraction," the title of the current group show at Locks Gallery, could pass for one of those painfully artspeaky contemporary labels for a trend. In fact, Clement Greenberg, the reigning American art critic of the 1950s and 1960s, came up with the term, and it's the one most closely associated with him today. The former champion of abstract expressionism and its dense, agitated surfaces used it as the title for an exhibition he organized for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1964, of paintings by 31 artists - among them Helen Frankenthaler, Ellsworth Kelly, Morris Louis, Frank Stella, Jules Olitski, Gene Davis, and Kenneth Noland - who favored a new style of openness and linear clarity.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The first thing one should understand about "The Figurative Fifties," the new exhibition at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, is that contrary to the implications of its catchy title, it's a tightly focused examination of a particular situation in a specific place. "The Figurative Fifties" is not a definitive examination of figurative painting during the 1950s, nor even of American figurative painting, nor even - and this is where one really begins to split hairs - of figurative painting in New York, which by 1950 had clearly become the center of the American art world.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karl Hagedorn, 83, a German-born artist whose paintings integrated body parts, geometric forms, numerical symbols and color images into "symbolic abstraction," died of esophageal cancer Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. He had lived in Center City for six years since moving from New York. Mr. Hagedorn's artistic life began in Guentersberge, a small village in the Harz Mountains in what was then the Weimar Republic. The son of a sawmill owner, he grew up around machinery, gears, wood grains, and kaleidoscopes of geometrical planes.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Bim the Bornean orangutan, a local painter of note who introduced abstract art to fellow residents at the Philadelphia Zoo's World of Primates exhibit, died Saturday. He was 21. "There's no doubt he's an artist," said keeper Maria Schwalbe in a moment of reflection during a preview of Bim's work last year. "There's a deliberateness to what he does. " Bim had been on public exhibit until he became acutely ill Friday morning, according to Keith Hinshaw, zoo vice president for animal health.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Merle Spandorfer of Cheltenham, whose mixed-media paintings, pasteups and occasional lithographs have had a Hawaiian theme for the last five years, continues in that vein. This can be seen in her new solo exhibit at Mangel Gallery, run by Merion's Ben and Debby Mangel. This may be the most autobiographical of all Spandorfer's nearly two dozen solo shows to date. And therefore, it may be the key to her work as a whole. The pictures pull together the artist's personal experience of hiking in the rain forests near Hana, Maui, last summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Now a century old, abstract art still vexes many people. Why it should do so is puzzling, because nature is full of abstractions, such as clouds, snowflakes and birdsongs, that most of us find perfectly normal. How can museums help with this problem? "The Spirit of Abstraction" at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown is a small exhibition that tries to demystify abstract art, but only partly succeeds. The show of 22 paintings from the museum's collection (including a few loans)
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Campbell, 97, of Spring Garden, an illustrator, painter, and cofounder of the Main Point, a former cabaret in Bryn Mawr, died Wednesday, Oct. 31, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Campbell had 47 solo exhibits and shared space at numerous shows with other artists over a career spanning more than 70 years. In a statement for an exhibit in 2000 at Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill, he said he experimented with "dimension, texture, and color" to create his abstract art. He also exhibited at Woodmere in 2010 and 2011.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
When the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated on Veterans Day a decade ago, Tom Wolfe denounced this "pit," this black granite wall, as "a tribute to Jane Fonda. " How could abstract art humanly represent the dead and missing? Jan Scruggs, the Vietnam corporal who conceived the idea, knew how. So did Maya Lin, the architecture student who won the design competition. Mr. Scruggs had a dual objective. That the memorial would both recognize and honor the dead. And that, once built, it would begin a process of reconcilation.
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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has named Matthew Affron, a scholar and curator at the University of Virginia, to the museum's prestigious post of curator of modern art, museum officials announced Friday. Affron succeeds Michael Taylor, who was named head of the Hood Museum at Dartmouth College in 2011. Timothy Rub, director of the Art Museum, also announced that Dirk H. Breiding, an assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has been named associate curator of arms and armor in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has named Matthew Affron, a scholar and curator at the University of Virginia, to the museum's prestigious post of curator of modern art, museum officials announced Friday. Affron succeeds Michael Taylor, who was named head of the Hood Museum at Dartmouth College in 2011. Timothy Rub, director of the art museum, also announced that Dirk H. Breiding, an assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has been named associate curator of arms and armor in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Campbell, 97, of Spring Garden, an illustrator, painter, and cofounder of the Main Point, a former cabaret in Bryn Mawr, died Wednesday, Oct. 31, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Campbell had 47 solo exhibits and shared space at numerous shows with other artists over a career spanning more than 70 years. In a statement for an exhibit in 2000 at Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill, he said he experimented with "dimension, texture, and color" to create his abstract art. He also exhibited at Woodmere in 2010 and 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Michael Morrill, a prominent Pittsburgh abstract painter, is introduced at Seraphin Gallery in his first Philadelphia solo. A teacher of studio art at the University of Pittsburgh, the Yale-trained Morrill became an artist when the reductive aesthetic of the 1970s, not the more austere minimalism of the 1960s, was emerging and combining itself with painterly enrichment - something that characterizes his distinctive handling of this method. I'd say Morrill keeps half a foot in the reductive camp, while his paintings emphasize their expressive option with brilliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
AMONG the paintings in the recent "Karmic Abstraction" show at Bridgette Mayer Gallery was a large piece by Ryan McGinness. An art-world star - the New York Times says so - his work hangs in respected institutions like the Museum of Modern Art and Spain's MUSAC. He's kind of a big deal. McGinness had other works in the show, but let's focus on one: "Untitled (Black Hole, Black 72.1). " On a black background, neon squiggles race in and out of each other as if created by some cosmic Spirograph.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The entry hall to Flora Becker's striking Center City condominium at the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton is lined with art. The living room features a handsome Steinway baby grand piano. The kitchen, with its glass backsplash and walnut cabinetry, is a testament to sleek modern efficiency and elegance.    But those are mere distractions. The main event asserts itself within seconds: It's the view of Philadelphia's core - City Hall, its courtyard, William Penn and his hat, and a skyscape that simply will not be ignored.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
It's clearly a sign of the times that "Post Painterly Abstraction," the title of the current group show at Locks Gallery, could pass for one of those painfully artspeaky contemporary labels for a trend. In fact, Clement Greenberg, the reigning American art critic of the 1950s and 1960s, came up with the term, and it's the one most closely associated with him today. The former champion of abstract expressionism and its dense, agitated surfaces used it as the title for an exhibition he organized for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1964, of paintings by 31 artists - among them Helen Frankenthaler, Ellsworth Kelly, Morris Louis, Frank Stella, Jules Olitski, Gene Davis, and Kenneth Noland - who favored a new style of openness and linear clarity.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karl Hagedorn, 83, a German-born artist whose paintings integrated body parts, geometric forms, numerical symbols and color images into "symbolic abstraction," died of esophageal cancer Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. He had lived in Center City for six years since moving from New York. Mr. Hagedorn's artistic life began in Guentersberge, a small village in the Harz Mountains in what was then the Weimar Republic. The son of a sawmill owner, he grew up around machinery, gears, wood grains, and kaleidoscopes of geometrical planes.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's art for a mass audience, but it happens to be on view at an art museum. I'm referring to "The Berenstain Bears Celebrate: The Art of Stan and Jan Berenstain" at the Michener Art Museum. This traveling exhibition of Berenstain illustrations for children's books was organized for the Norman Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts by David Leopold of Bedminster. The occasion being celebrated is the 40-year career of the originators of books about a family of bears who live "down a sunny dirt road in Bear Country.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
Religious belief has been the engine driving much of the world's art. It also can ignite political conflicts large and small, as recent events show. Over the last two weeks, a group of 59 teachers gathered at the Art Museum's summer teacher's institute to learn how art might provide a safe zone for classroom discussion of religious issues. "Religion is one of the last great taboos . . . as far as education is concerned," museum educator Danielle Rice said in opening the 10-day program.
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