CollectionsAbu Ghraib
IN THE NEWS

Abu Ghraib

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
Webster's dictionary defines the word accountable as being "responsible" for one's acts. It is striking how absent that word is from political discourse in Washington. Does anyone at high levels hold himself accountable for gross mistakes that have harmed America's interests? The only time I recall a senior administration official saying, "I am accountable; I take full responsibility," was Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, at Senate hearings a year ago on the Abu Ghraib scandal.
NEWS
September 15, 2004 | By Bruce Ackerman
We are opening a new stage in our collective confrontation with Abu Ghraib. America has taken the lead in the postwar period in holding officials in other countries legally responsible for their abuses of power. It is time to judge ourselves by the same rules we impose upon others. Consider one of the great recent achievements of American diplomacy: the creation of the war crimes tribunal for Yugoslavia, now sitting in the Hague. Americans are largely responsible for the statute governing these trials.
NEWS
February 21, 2006 | By MARY SHAW
The "war on terror" has prompted many to ponder the deplorable conditions at Abu Ghraib, Guantanamo Bay and other locations far from home. However, many Americans might not realize that prison conditions are often just as harsh right here in the United States. Human rights and criminal justice groups have compiled numerous accounts of prisoner abuse in correctional facilities right here in the Delaware Valley. Prison overcrowding is an enormous issue, not only in itself, but as it triggers more problems bound to occur when too many people are forced to occupy close spaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
USMC Sgt. Javal Davis, a reservist assigned to Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, described the infamous fortress as "medieval," like "something from a Mad Max movie. " But as we know now, or think we do, what occurred at Abu Ghraib was no Mad Max action-adventure. It was real torture-porn. With the pictures to prove it. Now, here comes Errol Morris, the Oscar-winning documentarian of The Fog of War (about former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and the Vietnam military action)
NEWS
May 2, 2005 | By Matt Stearns and Lauren Markoe INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A year ago, when the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke, several U.S. senators warned that top military officers and civilian policymakers must share the blame for lower-ranking soldiers who abused prisoners. That has not happened. Instead, while the scandal has widened to include allegations of mistreatment at facilities in Afghanistan and at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the senators' tough talk has mellowed considerably. Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Armed Services Committee Chairman John W. Warner of Virginia all initially demanded accountability up the chain of command for poor policy and failed oversight.
NEWS
January 25, 2005
I WAS A YOUNG draftee in 1971 when I learned of the atrocities committed by U.S. soldiers at My Lai. Today, the official memorial in My Lai lists the 504 villagers murdered on that day. The dead included 182 women (17 of whom were pregnant) and 173 children (56 of whom were infants). On March 29, 1971, Lt. William Calley Jr., the lone individual convicted, was sentenced by a military court to life in prison at hard labor. A series of appeals reduced Calley's sentence. He was paroled after 3 1/2 years of house arrest.
NEWS
October 25, 2004
To help voters in our closely contested region make an informed choice in this critical 2004 presidential election, The Inquirer Editorial Board offers a series of editorials documenting its reasons for endorsing John F. Kerry. A rebutting essay from a supporter of President George W. Bush appears on the facing Commentary Page. To read previous editorials and rebuttal essays, please go to http://go.philly.com/21reasons. Tomorrow's topic: Energy Policy. Imagine you're walking through the parking lot at King of Prussia mall.
NEWS
June 12, 2004 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The boy said goodbye to his boss at an upholstery shop, passed a violent anti-American demonstration on the way home, and has not been seen since. Mohamed Khaled Saleem's parents thought their 15-year-old son's disappearance six months ago was unique until their search led them this month to Abu Ghraib, the vast American-run prison where graphic photos of soldiers abusing Iraqi inmates were taken. American administrators have lost track of dozens of detainees inside Abu Ghraib in the last year, according to human-rights workers, former inmates, a former prison investigator, attorneys, detainees' families, and prisoner-rights groups.
NEWS
May 9, 2004
Donald Rumsfeld should resign as U.S. secretary of defense. If he lacks the decency and courage to do so, President Bush should fire him. A river of shame washes over America because of the deaths, torture and humiliation of prisoners held by the American military in Iraq and Afghanistan, particularly at the Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad. Prosecuting a few grunts who used torture tactics (and were depraved enough to grin while doing it) will not expiate this shame.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By William DiMascio
This is an extraordinary moment in history when worldwide attention seems focused on war and prisons. People usually don't give much thought to prisons unless they or someone close to them are inside a cell. But photographs of the abusive treatment of Iraqi detainees at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison have generated genuine global shock and awe. They've put a stone in the heart of America! Times spent in combat zones or prisons have much in common. Days can be banal, surreal and terrifying.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Some people jog for exercise, some for fun, some to lose weight or sleep better. Nicole Duchman runs for her health - physical and mental. For her, the steady movement of legs and torso across pavement is a way to allay the emotional trauma of war, experienced as an Army specialist in Iraq. Diagnosed with post-traumatic stress syndrome that can cause her to become irritable and frustrated, running offers respite and freedom. "It calms me down, lets me focus, lets me settle," Duchman said.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Adam Schreck, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Al-Qaeda's branch in Iraq claimed responsibility Tuesday for audacious raids on two high-security prisons on the outskirts of Baghdad this week that killed dozens and set free hundreds of inmates, including some of its followers. The statement from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, the al-Qaeda affiliate in Iraq, was posted on a jihadist website. It said months of planning went into assaults on the prisons in Abu Ghraib and Taji that began late Sunday. The attacks, among the most stunning in Iraq since a surge in violence began in April, have drawn sharp criticism from opposition lawmakers and ordinary Iraqis over government efforts to keep the country safe.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD - Iraqi security forces locked down areas around the infamous Abu Ghraib prison and another high-security detention facility on Baghdad's outskirts yesterday to hunt for escaped inmates and militants after daring insurgent assaults set hundreds of detainees free. The carefully orchestrated late-night attacks killed dozens Sunday, including at least 25 members of the Iraqi security forces. Insurgents fired dozens of mortar shells and detonated suicide and car bombs, drawing Iraqi forces into firefights that lasted more than an hour.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
Iraqi forces hunt escapees BAGHDAD - Iraqi security forces locked down areas around the infamous Abu Ghraib prison and another high-security detention facility on Baghdad's outskirts Monday to hunt for escaped inmates and militants after daring insurgent assaults set hundreds of detainees free. The carefully orchestrated late-night attacks killed dozens Sunday, including at least 25 members of the Iraqi security forces. Insurgents fired dozens of mortar shells and detonated suicide and car bombs.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
WikiLeaks case penalty reduced FORT MEADE, Md. - An Army private suspected of sending reams of classified documents to the WikiLeaks website was illegally punished at a Marine Corps brig and should get 112 days cut from any prison sentence he receives if convicted, a military judge ruled Tuesday. Army Col. Denise Lind ruled during a pretrial hearing that authorities went too far in their confinement of Pfc. Bradley Manning for nine months in Quantico, Va., in 2010 and 2011. Manning was confined to a windowless cell 23 hours a day, sometimes with no clothing.
NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Pete Yost and Adam Goldman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A Justice Department inquiry into CIA interrogations of detainees has led to a full criminal investigation into the deaths of two people while they were in custody in Iraq and Afghanistan, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Thursday. The attorney general said that he accepted the recommendation of a federal prosecutor, John Durham, who since August 2009 has conducted an inquiry into CIA interrogation practices during the Bush administration. Holder said Durham looked at the treatment of 101 detainees in U.S. custody since the Sept.
NEWS
January 3, 2010 | By Max Boot
Canada is embroiled in a controversy over its treatment of prisoners captured in Afghanistan. Its policy has been to turn detainees over to the Afghans, whose prisons are not exactly run according to Amnesty International standards. Now, the chief of the Canadian defense staff, Gen. Walter Natynczyk, has set off a political firestorm by admitting that a detainee who had been beaten in 2006 had initially been in Canadian custody - something he had previously denied. "You continue to transfer prisoners to torture in the name of Canada," one Liberal parliamentarian told the Conservative government.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
Torture kept no one safe The remarks by former Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday were as shady as President Obama's were candid ("Squaring off on closing Guantanamo," Friday). Consider, for instance, Cheney's reference to the "willful attempt to conflate what happened at Abu Ghraib prison with the top-secret program of enhanced interrogations. " Anyone who has read the Red Cross report and the recently released memos showing CIA interrogators in continual contact with Office of Legal Counsel attorneys can easily trace what went on at Abu Ghraib right back up the chain of command.
NEWS
May 15, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
PRESIDENT Obama finally sent one soaring out of the park. Oh, I'm sure there are plenty of people who think he's been hitting grand slams for the last four months, stimulating the economy to the tune of trillions, ungagging foreign abortion providers, filling his administration with lefties (the ones who remembered to pay their taxes, that is) and giving his daughters a cute puppy. But to many of us in right field, the prospect of his four-year contract thrilled us almost as much as W. tickled the fancy of the programmers at MSNBC.
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By Michael Smerconish
If President Obama had read The Inquirer on Tuesday, he would have seen this headline: " 'We're proud' of 9/11, Guantanamo pair say. " What followed was an Associated Press story on what could be the last session of the war-crimes court in Guantanamo Bay. "We did what we did; we're proud of Sept. 11," said Ramzi Binalshibh, a senior al-Qaeda member. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the 9/11 mastermind, echoed that sentiment, and at one point asked that his lawyer be removed because counsel represented the "people who tortured me. " Torture was on Obama's mind in his inaugural address and two days later when he signed an executive order outlawing aggressive interrogation techniques.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|