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SPORTS
April 25, 2008 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The University of Pennsylvania had 20 sports teams singled out by the NCAA for outstanding academic performance, it was announced yesterday. Penn's teams were included among 712 squads nationwide recognized by the NCAA. Yale produced the most impressive classroom performance for the second year in a row. Of the 29 men's and women's sports offered by the school and measured by the NCAA, the Bulldogs made the list in 28 sports. Villanova's football team also was recognized. The grades are calculated over a 4-year period but not including 2007-08.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | By Jeremy Treatman, Special to The Inquirer
Penncrest's Kiernan Conn is not your prototypical wrestler. "I think I break the average stereotype for wrestlers," he said. "Even my own teammates joke about me because I often am reading or doing homework while waiting for my match to begin. " Reading? At a wrestling match? Sure, when you are taking seven accelerated college preparatory classes; captaining the school's Hi-Q team, which competes academically in quizzes against other schools; teaching a Saturday morning karate class for grade schoolers, and preparing for the weekend's science olympics, you need all the time you can get. "I have always done a lot of things at the same time, especially in academics," Conn said.
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bishop Eustace centerfielder Tom Cuneo, one of the fastest outfielders in South Jersey, has made an oral commitment to attend the University of Pennsylvania. Cuneo, who has scored 1,400 on the Scholastic Assessment Test, said his decision was made Saturday after he received early acceptance to the Ivy League school. "I really wanted to go to Penn because of the academics, and I also like the baseball program," Cuneo said yesterday. "They have a couple of seniors graduating, and I was told I will have a chance to play right away.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Penn Wood wrestling coach Steve Palis says he's seen his share of athletes who decide they want to pursue athletics in college but let their academics suffer at the expense of an extra five minutes in the weight room. "Some of those kids think a school won't care what their grades are or their test scores are as long as they're good athletes," Palis said. "When they finally realize the mistake they've made, sometimes it's too late. Those kids go about doing things the wrong way. " Based on that, David Wood, a team captain and one of the best all-round athletes in Delaware County, is going about things the right way. In addition to his status as an all-Del Val league performer in wrestling, football and baseball, Wood has a 3.7 grade-point average, which gives him a class rank of 11 out of 349, a spot on Penn Wood's honor roll and membership in the National Honor Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
When they hear the word adoption, people often think of babies. However, the majority of children in need of permanent homes are school-age, and many are teenagers. Among them is Jordan. At 15, he is handsome, attentive, and well-mannered, and takes pride in his appearance. He also excels in sports, enjoys playing basketball with friends, and gets a kick out of testing his skills at video games. Jordan's favorite foods are hamburgers, french fries, spaghetti with meatballs, rice and beans, and salads.
SPORTS
June 30, 1986 | By MIKE KERN, Daily News Sports Writer Compiled from staff and wire reports
As University of Maryland officials attempt to make academics a priority for their athletes in the wake of the Len Bias tragedy, some former Terrapin basketball players have told The Baltimore Sun how difficult it was to maintain a high grade-point average and a high scoring average at the same time. "It's only my opinion, but I don't think many people can do both well," said Lawrence Boston, 30, who starred for Maryland in the late 1970s and now plays professionally in Europe.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | By Susan Balee
If someone attacks you in the groves of academe, you can't very well swing a machete at them. Therefore, words are our weapons, and we academics are all avid quoters of the wisdom of others. Rudyard Kipling got it right when he said, "Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind. " That means words can also be misused or abused. Some of us are more likely than others to overdose on words. Worst of all, for those of us on college campuses, it's too easy to say the right words and skip the actions that should go with them.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
On a sprawling tract of wooded farmland in rural Chester County, kindergarten pupils at a private school slice apples, bananas and oranges for a fruit salad they will eat later in the day; use their fingers to knit strands of yarn; dress up to play make-believe; and listen to stories told by their teacher. At Avery D. Harrington Elementary in West Philadelphia and William Dick Elementary in North Philadelphia - and at all other city public schools - 5- year-olds are recognizing letters of the alphabet and making up sentences to show they understand the days of the week.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cabrini College's Donna Schaeffer has three majors, two sports and a schedule as congested as New York City traffic at rush hour. But Schaeffer isn't complaining. "I'm concentrating on academics," she said. "But I'm glad I have tennis and softball. They help me keep my sanity. " Schaeffer, a Phoenixville High graduate, has been cracking books and forehands with equal success lately. She majors in English, communications and history, and carries a 3.1 grade-point average.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
I am going to make a statement. You tell me if it is racist. Black athletes appear to be able to jump higher and sprint faster than white athletes. I base that statement on two things: What I see with my own eyes. I see collegiate and professional basketball dominated by black players with great leaping and sprinting ability. In football, I see almost all positions requiring bursts of speed dominated by black players. In track, I see black runners dominating the shorter distances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Yale Rabin, 88, a Philadelphia urban planner who was a plaintiffs' witness in the court cases that successfully sought to provide affordable housing in Mount Laurel, died of heart failure Tuesday, March 22, at his home at Foulkeways, the retirement community in Gwynedd, Montgomery County. Peter J. O'Connor, a lead lawyer for the plaintiffs, said that Mr. Rabin testified, in 1976 for the case decided in 1983, "as an expert witness on issues of equal facilities at the time between the black and the white communities.
SPORTS
September 24, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
THE IRONY? West Chester senior Tim Brown had just made an honor roll for the first time in his life. Then he found out that he'd been ruled ineligible by the NCAA because of an administrative error. "That's the part that made it almost comical to me," said Brown. "I didn't want anyone to think I'd done anything wrong. I'd just had my best semester ever. So I'm thinking, 'Man, maybe if I hadn't worked so hard.' That's crazy. I just didn't understand how I could be penalized for taking too many classes.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new group - backed by the region's largest health insurer, its top academic medical centers, Comcast Corp., and others - wants to roll out the red carpet for health-care start-ups in the Philadelphia region. The Health Care Innovation Collaborative grew out of a CEO Council for Growth task force chaired by John Fry, president of Drexel University, and Dan Hilferty, president and chief executive of Independence Blue Cross. The collaborative is to be announced Wednesday at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's annual State of the Region meeting in Center City.
SPORTS
May 26, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Roberts Vaux High basketball standout Rysheed Jordan could be ruled academically ineligible to play for St. John's this fall, according to a report by the New York Daily News. The 6-foot-4 guard would be the team's leading returning scorer if he comes back for his junior season. He averaged 14.1 points and a team-high 3.1 assists last season. According to the report, there is a chance that Jordan will not return to the team at all, although he is expected to meet with new St. John's coach Chris Mullin soon.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Starnes Walker was a newly minted physicist and Navy electronic-weapons veteran in the 1970s, his job at Phillips Petroleum Corp. included finding ways to replace human oil-refinery operators, who once hand-checked miles of pipes, with digitally networked monitors and switches. "So that, now, valves are controlled by computers," Walker says, from his office in a converted Chrysler factory, where he heads the University of Delaware's new Cybersecurity Initiative. That digital technology had far-reaching results: It's part of the reason the brightly lit refineries that still line the rivers near Houston and Philadelphia now employ hundreds of workers each, not thousands.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shareef Miller is the city's top uncommitted senior football player. College coaches keep in touch daily. Scouts from three Division I programs attended the same game. Washington High's 6-foot-4, 225-pound defensive end is a commodity among college coaches. Those coaches that are trying to woo him should know one thing: hold off on the football talk. "I don't really like hearing about the football part first. I want to hear about the academics," Miller said after the Eagles finished practice Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
When they hear the word adoption, people often think of babies. However, the majority of children in need of permanent homes are school-age, and many are teenagers. Among them is Jordan. At 15, he is handsome, attentive, and well-mannered, and takes pride in his appearance. He also excels in sports, enjoys playing basketball with friends, and gets a kick out of testing his skills at video games. Jordan's favorite foods are hamburgers, french fries, spaghetti with meatballs, rice and beans, and salads.
SPORTS
October 1, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As part of its effort to improve the student-athlete experience, Temple unveiled the newly renovated Nancy and Donald Resnick Academic Support Center on Monday. The university began renovating the center in August. Located on the ground floor at McGonigle Hall, the area houses six private student services rooms for tutoring, peer mentoring and private study; 10 new offices for advisers and learning specialists; an expanded computer lab with 36 computers; and a seating capacity that has gone from 34 to approximately 100. "This is very important for our student-athletes," athletic director Kevin Clark said.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
As an embattled city charter school prepares to welcome 1,350 students on Tuesday, founder Walter D. Palmer remains hopeful the school that bears his name will remain open past June. Palmer, a veteran educator, lawyer, and community activist, said his school had devised an academic turnaround plan and proposed an agreement with the Philadelphia School District to resolve an enrollment dispute. He hopes to stave off a charter-revocation hearing and funding cuts that threaten the school's survival.
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