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NEWS
March 16, 1994 | PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS and KYW-3
Next Monday is the night we wait for each year: the Academy Awards ceremony. But you don't have to wait to cast your vote. Every day this week you can pick your favorites in a different Oscar category. Just call the number below from your touch tone phone and follow the directions. On March 21, look for the complete line-up of the Oscar Phone Poll winners in the Daily News Yo! section, along with an Oscar scorecard to help you follow along with that evening's actual winners. TO VOTE FOR BEST DIRECTOR, call 854-2955.
NEWS
March 10, 2006
WHAT DEAL was cut for the prestigious Academy Awards to bestow art status with an Oscar for best song on the simple-minded "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp"? Everybody got so upset about the low-class "wardrobe malfunction" by Janet Jackson, but awarding an Oscar for a song on such a topic by no-talent performers lacking any grace is no problem. All the great songwriters - Gershwin, Bernstein, Cohan, Cole Porter, Rogers and Hart - must be spinning in their graves. They had class.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2001 | by Jack Mathews New York Daily News
The dumbing-down of American film seems complete now. Judging from the Academy Awards, mediocrity is the new standard. Imitation is no longer the sincerest form of flattery; it's an art form unto itself. Ridley Scott's "Gladiator," which falls somewhere between a poor man's "Ben-Hur" and a rich man's "Hercules Unchained," has been deemed the best film of 2000. And Russell Crowe, who went from Maximus to Gluteus Maximus in one year, is the man who would be king. Thumbs. . .down, I say!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Color Purple," a movie that has evoked outrage and praise and protests and debates since it opened last December, is still setting off controversy, this time because it failed to win any Oscars. The day after "Purple's" cast and crew went home from the Academy Awards without a single Oscar out of 11 nominations, the Hollywood-Beverly Hills branch of the NAACP protested, calling it "a slap in the faces" of producer-composer Quincy Jones and director Steven Spielberg. And at the Urban League of Philadelphia's annual dinner the same evening, former Deputy Mayor George Burrell said the night before, when the awards ceremony was broadcast, "must have been April Fool's day" because it was unbelievable the movie won no awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2002 | By JACK MATHEWS New York Daily News
It might go without saying that the world doesn't need another televised movie awards show, but the first AFI Awards, airing live at 8 tonight on Channel 3, deserves its own recognition for wretched excess. The show - it will also include another unnecessary set of awards for TV - was conceived by the American Film Institute, which began life in 1967 with the objective of "preserving the heritage and advancing the art of film in America," and which has evolved into a giant, money-sucking parasite.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | By Frank Sanello, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ready or not, tonight's the night for the Academy Awards show, at 9 on ABC (Channel 6). When you review the program's bumpy history, a major question arises: Can a host make or break the annual Oscar telecast? Past and present producers of the Academy Awards ceremony seem to think so. Most agree on one thing: It's easy for participants to get bogged down in the seriousness of the evening's honors and awards. And though a solemn attitude may be great for a Nobel Prize ceremony, it can spell death for a three-hour show that's supposed to be entertaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
Geraldine Page won - and lost - last night. By winning the Academy Award for Best Actress, Page, 61, broke the tie with Peter O'Toole for the dubious distinction of most nominations without an Oscar. Both had eight, but Page's victory gives O'Toole sole possession of the Longest Foreplay category. Nominated for her portrayal of Carrie Watts, a Texas widow in "The Trip to Bountiful," Page said the "role lets me show all the things I've learned about acting. " In 36 years, that's quite a lot. She was accompanied to last night's ceremonies by her husband of 23 years, actor Rip Torn, with whom she has three children.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Clearing out the Oscar notebook: Alert viewers - and perhaps there were some left as the Academy Awards broadcast lurched into its fourth hour Monday night - may have wondered what exactly Bernardo Bertolucci meant by referring to Hollywood as "The Big Nipple. " When he came back to chat with the world's press after The Last Emperor had walked off with everything but the hors d'oeuvres at the Governor's Ball, the director explained. Winning nine Academy Awards was something that nurtured one's career in a Freudian sense, he said.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
DON'T THINK OF it as a telecast. The Oscars are never just a telecast. Think of it as a fashion show, a stand-up set and a concert, with a healthy dose of Hollywood pomposity coating the entire proceedings. I don't take the Academy Awards all that seriously. But I love them anyway. It's cliche to call the Oscars the Super Bowl for the pop culture-obsessed set, but I watch the December movies and follow smaller awards shows as if they are the playoffs, setting up for the big game that will occur this Sunday on ABC. My Oscars day starts several hours before the show begins and involves a lot of alcohol.
SPORTS
June 30, 1988 | By RAY DIDINGER, Daily News Sports Writer
NFL Films has branched out quite a bit in its 26 years. The folks who created the Football Follies have tackled a variety of art forms - including rock videos and a documentary on moon flight - and they made it look easy. Tonight, NFL Films takes on a new challenge: a live awards show patterned after the Oscars. The black-tie affair will be held at the WHYY-TV studios in Independence Mall with the nominees and presenters arriving - by limousine, of course - at 7:30 p.m. It is called the first annual NFL Filmstar Awards, with tickets selling for $100 and proceeds going to the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
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