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Academy Of Natural Sciences

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
A weekend of fossils is sure to leave an impression during the annual Paleopalooza festival at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. The two-day festival on Saturday and Sunday will feature seldom-seen specimens from the academy and the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society. Guests can become a dinosaur CSI and solve a mystery from millions of years ago, meet a 15-foot-long animatronic T. rex, and also take guided tours of Dinosaur Hall at 10 a.m., noon, 2, and 4 p.m. Visitors can watch paleontological specimens prepared for the unveiling of a new kind of Patagonian dinosaur from Argentina.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
It was the time of P.T. Barnum, when people would line up to see a whitewashed elephant or a carefully faked petrified giant. But in 1868, a display in Philadelphia proved that reality could be far stranger than fiction. That year, the Academy of Natural Sciences showed the world its first glimpse of a real dinosaur skeleton - a 15-foot-tall Godzilla pulled from a pit in Haddonfield. The creature threatened to obliterate the traditional picture of the universe. Along with Darwin's theory and a revolution in geology, dinosaur fossils were opening the human imagination to lost worlds on our own planet, separated by vast epochs of time.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
The Triceratops paws the Mesozoic landscape, lowers its three-horned head and fixes a stern eye on you while it emits a threatening bellow. The effect is startling. You know the dinosaur isn't real, but it's just real enough to make you pause and wonder at the remarkable exhibit "Dinosaurs Alive!" at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Five large-scale model dinosaurs are the stars of an exhibit of films, fossils and other dinosaur artifacts on display at the Academy. The dinosaurs are computer-controlled creatures, stuffed with air-driven valves that move eyes, open mouths, lift legs, turn heads and twitch tails in a dimly lit setting of plants and rocks meant to resemble a prehistoric playground.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1991 | ANDREA MIHALIK/DAILY NEWS
A friendly dinosaur, moonlighting from his regular job as an exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences, hands out brochures at Provident National Bank, announcing the new Culture Card program. Designed to stimulate larger audiences for the city's cultural institutions, the program offers Provident credit card holders $20 membership or subscription discounts to the Academy of Natural Sciences, American Music Theater Festival, Pennsylvania Ballet or Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | For The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
It wasn't that pillowy purple dino, but T. Rex himself who drew a crowd near Bloomingdale's at the Court at King of Prussia. Children gathered round to make dinosaur prints with Academy of Natural Sciences staff, who brought along the beast and other prehistoric fun.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
The monthlong dinosaur extravaganza known as Dinofest hits the homestretch this week at the Philadelphia Civic Center. More than 250,000 people have seen the exhibit, described as the largest collection of dinosaur bones and fossils ever assembled. The Academy of Natural Sciences' show runs through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Never mind the dinosaur bones and butterfly specimens; instead, ogle the results of the beats pulsing tonight from Jim Diesel's turntables at the Academy of Natural Sciences. On Saturday, Rookie, Roger Culture and Daddy Chris are at it again: The three host a Caribbean boat ride on the Riverboat Queen. And "may the schwartz be with you" Saturday at Motion for "Space Ballz" with Jeff Heart and Johnathan Williams. The sound is breaks mixed with a little trip-hop and drum-and-bass when SOTO, Seen, Lovegrove, Moshen and Sean G take over TPDS on Sunday.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
LIKE a lot of kids, Christian Vanni became fascinated by dinosaurs at an early age. And, like most kids, he got over it and went on to other interests. But his mother was hooked. His mother, Patricia Ruth Kane-Vanni, a lawyer, artist and singer, added paleontologist to her resume. She took a course in paleontology and became a devoted volunteer at the Academy of Natural Sciences. She participated in several digs in this country and Egypt, sometimes using her artistic talent to sketch fossils; wrote about her expeditions in books and magazines, and gave talks at schools.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
In 1868, the Academy of Natural Sciences mounted the first-ever full dinosaur skeleton. A century and a half later, it's forcing the dinos out of extinction with state-of-the-art animatronics that mimic their actions, looks, and sounds from millions of years ago. "Back in 1868, no one had ever conceived of being able to see a skeleton of an animal like a dinosaur, and just to see the skeleton was a wonder of the world," said Ted Daeschler, the...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016
Tarantulas: Alive and Up Close The long: In a dimly lit gallery next to the Academy of Natural Sciences' butterfly room, 20 hairy, crawly, colorful eight-legged species of the world's largest spiders quietly lurk behind thick panes of glass, spinning webs, digging holes and eating crickets. The short: Sounds creepy but it looks lovely. The demo: Grade school on up. Big kids: Will love seeking and finding crawlers hiding behind logs and buried beneath dirt.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
THE CURATOR of the Department of Entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences doesn't want you to be bugged out by the Academy's newest exhibit - Tarantulas: Alive and Up Close - which opens this weekend. Sure, tarantulas are the biggest and hairiest of all spiders. And sure, only a pane of glass will separate visitors from 20 different species of the creature - including the largest-known variety, the goliath bird-eating tarantula - but Jon Gelhaus said visitors have nothing to fear and may even get over their fears by confronting them at the exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reptiles are cool (and not just because they're cold-blooded). Find out why and get up close and personal with the scaly set during the opening of the exhibit Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly at the Academy of Natural Sciences, featuring 20 species of live examples, including a monitor lizard, bearded dragon, Gila monster, crocodile, alligator, chameleon, gecko, python, viper, cobra, and more. Opening events include hands-on activities, crafts, and live-animal shows with naturalists giving talks such as "Dandy Dinos and Bodacious Birds," about the most popular reptiles of all time - the long-gone dinosaurs - and their fine-feathered relatives still with us (11 a.m.)
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
David George Gordon, author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, offers tips on how to (and how not to) cook with insects. He'll be on hand to answer questions at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University's Bug Fest , Aug. 8 and 9, 11 a.m. to noon and 3 to 5 p.m. His insect cooking show starts at 1 p.m. 1. Buy, don't scavenge. The backyard and basement are not the best places to source insect-ingredients. "The big problem is pesticides. If the bugs have been eating pesticides, you can become a bioaccumulator and wind up storing all that pesticide in your body.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
Glow: Living Lights Your backyard fireflies ain't got nothin' on the glow-in-the-dark worms, hairy desert scorpions and otherworldly-looking, middle-ocean creatures that scientists call "bioluminescent. " Here through September, this exhibit is, perhaps predictably, mostly dark. Better to enjoy the light-emitting rare specimens, both living and formerly living, such as a striking stauroteuthis syrtensis , a glowing sucker octopus. Interactive stations let visitors light up dinoflagellates, a/k/a single-cell organisms, dress up like sea creatures, and get up close and personal with a massive angelfish.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., creepy critters and butterflies infest the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University for the fifth annual Bug Fest. Families can also sample bugs as a culinary treat. The festival marks bug month and the academy's yearlong bicentennial celebration, and its theme is butterflies from around the world. The academy's "Butterflies" permanent tropical garden exhibit will showcase birdwing butterflies from Asia and Australia and the colorful green species Ornithoptera priamus . Roaches also participate, showing their competitive skills during the Roach Race 500, where you can cheer and support your favorite insect runner.
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