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Accidental Death

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NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Mitch Stacy, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - An Ohio Amish man who fired a shot into the air that killed a 15-year-old girl driving a horse-drawn buggy more than a mile away will go to jail for 30 days, a prosecutor said Wednesday. As part of an agreement with prosecutors, Marion Yoder, 28, pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor count of negligent homicide, said Steve Knowling, the prosecutor for Holmes County in northern Ohio. A judge sentenced Yoder to the maximum 180 days in the county jail, but suspended all but 30 days of the term.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A $175,000 insurance settlement has been proposed in the accidental death of a Willow Grove woman who was killed last year as she tried to cross a street in the borough's downtown business district. In papers filed in Montgomery County Court on Sept. 1, the insurance carriers for the two motorists involved in the accident, Allstate and Liberty Mutual, agreed to pay the estate of Mary F. Mason a total of $114,083. Rovner, Allen, Rovner, Zimmerman & Kats, the Feasterville law firm representing the estate, will receive a total of $60,919 for fees, according to Joseph DeSimone, who is the attorney handling the case.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The punishment given to 12 low-level employees at Veterans Administration hospitals in Coatesville and Philadelphia in the accidental death of a patient was nothing more than "a slap on the wrist," U.S. Rep. James J. Florio (D., N.J.) said yesterday. Florio, in a midmorning news conference at his Barrington, Camden County, office, called on VA officials to review the employees' suspensions and reprimands and to investigate whether any hospital supervisors should be disciplined in connection with the Nov. 5 death of John W. Martin.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
A Cape May County Superior Court judge yesterday sentenced William Muldoon to three years in the state penitentiary for causing the death of Pamela Gleason, 36, a mother of six and widow of slain Philadelphia police officer Daniel Gleason. Pamela Gleason, 36, of Northeast Philadelphia, was a passenger in Muldoon's car when it swerved and struck a tree on South Dennisville Road in Middle Township, Cape May County, early on Aug. 13, 1989. She died instantly. After her husband was murdered in 1986 investigating a dispute between prostitutes and residents in North Philadelphia, Gleason founded the local chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors, a national support group of spouses of police officers killed on duty.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
News of his death brought scores of friends to David Anderson's favorite New Hope watering hole one summer workday, filling tables with so many weeping patrons that bartenders had to serve up rolls of toilet paper. An extended group of adoring friends - 150 in all - showed up at the funeral days later to pay tribute to Anderson, 31, a popular, quick-witted musician from Ottsville, who was found dead early in the morning of July 24 in the spillway of the Delaware Canal in Lambertville, N.J. They still congregate, more than two months later, as much to grieve as to try to figure out how Anderson disappeared after a Friday night out - not to be found until the following Monday morning, near a public walkway in a heavily visited tourist town.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Pam Belluck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after the frozen body of golf pro Patrick Calandriello was found in a car trunk in Lionville with a bullet hole in the eye, his mother is trying to collect more of his death benefits. After months of failed negotiations, Agnes A. Calandriello last month filed suit in Chester County Court against a Colorado insurance company that had refused to pay the accidental-death benefit on a $25,000 policy. At issue is whether Patrick Calandriello, a 47-year-old Bridgeport resident, was killed while in the process of committing a felony - participating in an alleged conspiracy to buy stolen golf carts.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 42-year-old South Philadelphia mother said she is heartbroken over what she calls her daughter's "accidental" death on Dec. 21. Joann Miller contended at a bail hearing yesterday that a pistol she was cleaning went off accidentally and the bullet struck her daughter, Priscilla Johnson, 27, in the head. But Assistant District Attorney Robert Campolongo told Municipal Judge Morton Krase that Miller deliberately shot her daughter during an argument. The judge refused bail and set a hearing for next Tuesday.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contending that Flyers star goaltender Pelle Lindbergh died in November as a result of his own "criminal acts" of drunken driving and reckless driving, Lloyd's of London filed suit against the Flyers yesterday in an effort to avoid paying accidental-death benefits for Lindbergh. The internationally known underwriting concern contended in the lawsuit that it should not have to pay death benefits because a provision in its policy with the Flyers states that losses caused by the insured person's own "criminal or felonious act" would not be covered.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | By Lola Smallwood, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A borough woman was arrested yesterday and charged with fabricating a story about the way in which her husband died, in an attempt to collect a $100,000 life insurance policy, state officials said. The Attorney General's Office filed criminal charges against Rose M. Rutihinda, 30, alleging that she submitted false documents to J.C. Penney Life Insurance Co. to collect on the accidental death provision. The documents claimed that her husband was killed in an auto accident in Tanzania, officials said.
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NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even though cities have higher rates of crime and murder, a new study finds that overall, urban areas are safer than the sticks. However, that counterintuitive conclusion doesn't fit Philadelphia. The City of Brotherly Love turns out to be about as risky as rural areas, largely because of car accidents. "Philadelphia does tend to be on the worse end" of the safety spectrum for big cities, said lead researcher Sage Myers, an emergency medicine physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
December 20, 2012
The Penn State child sex-abuse scandal was selected as the sports story of the year by U.S. editors and news directors in an annual vote conducted by the Associated Press. The news broke in November 2011, with a grand jury report outlining charges against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, and the outrage that followed led to the firing of Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno. But the aftershocks were felt long into 2012: Sandusky was convicted in June of assaulting 10 boys, and the NCAA handed down brutal sanctions in July.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
New Jersey lawmakers should heed calls by a growing number of municipalities and override Gov. Christie's veto of legislation that could help prevent drug overdose deaths. The Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act, approved by the Legislature earlier this year with overwhelming bipartisan support, would provide limited legal protection to anyone who witnesses a drug overdose and calls for help. Currently, medical assistance is sought in only half of all overdose emergencies. No doubt, some witnesses are afraid of being prosecuted if they have to admit their own drug activity when the overdose occurred.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Mitch Stacy, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - An Ohio Amish man who fired a shot into the air that killed a 15-year-old girl driving a horse-drawn buggy more than a mile away will go to jail for 30 days, a prosecutor said Wednesday. As part of an agreement with prosecutors, Marion Yoder, 28, pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor count of negligent homicide, said Steve Knowling, the prosecutor for Holmes County in northern Ohio. A judge sentenced Yoder to the maximum 180 days in the county jail, but suspended all but 30 days of the term.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
2 were suffocated by train's coal ELLICOTT CITY, Md. - Two young women were killed when a freight train derailed early Tuesday and toppled so much coal on them they couldn't breathe, authorities said Thursday. The bodies of Elizabeth Nass and Rose Mayr were found buried under coal but still seated on the edge of the bridge, police have said. They were not hit by the train, Howard County police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said. Both were 19. Nass attended James Madison University in Virginia and Mayr was a nursing student at the University of Delaware.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A bill aimed at stemming the growing number of drug-related deaths in New Jersey is headed to the governor's desk following its approval by the Senate on Monday. The measure, known as the Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act, would offer limited immunity to a drug user who seeks medical help in the case of a companion's overdose. The Senate delayed voting on a more controversial bill - which would abolish the statute of limitations for civil suits in some sex-abuse cases -- after the bill's sponsor failed to muster sufficient support among the 33 legislators who attended the session.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Michael Tarm, Associated Press
JOLIET, Ill. - A forensic pathologist who performed a second autopsy on Drew Peterson's third wife years after she was found dead in her dry bathtub testified Thursday that there's just one plausible explanation for her death: She was murdered. A coroner initially ruled that Kathleen Savio died in an accidental fall in her bathtub. Her 2004 death was reclassified a homicide only after Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, vanished in 2007 and Larry Blum did his new examination. Testifying for a second day Thursday, Blum told jurors that he didn't believe an accidental fall could explain how Savio had a fresh gash on the back of her head and a pattern of deep bruises on the front of her body.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Roberta Sandler and FOR THE INQUIRER
Richmond, Va., is celebrating its 275th birthday this year and, as the former capital of the Confederacy, the city is especially relevant during the current sesquicentennial of the Civil War. The historic city has much to recommend it. Monument Avenue is a National Historic Landmark and a visual treat, thanks to carefully preserved Georgian, Regency, and Neoclassical homes lining the avenue, and to the procession of majestic bronze statues of Southern...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011
Theater 1812 Productions: This Is The Week That Is Annual show poking fun at local & national current events. Closes 12/31. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St.; 215-592-9560. 1812productions.org. $20-$36. Body Awareness A visiting artist's nude photographs rouse conflicting feelings in a college professor & her girlfriend. Closes 2/5. Wilma Theater, 265 S. Broad St.; 215-546-7824. $39-$47; $34-$42 seniors; $19.50-$23.50 ages 20-29 with ID. Cape May Stage: This Wonderful Life Stage adaptation of the classic holiday film, 'It's a Wonderful Life.' Closes 12/31.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
How do you say dated and boring in Italian? Oooh, wait, wait, I know, I know: Dario Fo. Curio Theatre is giving the Italian farce-meister a revival with its production of Fo's Accidental Death of an Anarchist , only to prove that this highly political comedy is thoroughly mired in postwar European issues and thus irrelevant to contemporary American audiences and, as a consequence, is desperately unfunny. Half absurdist, half commedia del arte, this indictment of police brutality involves a lot of slapstick, with fake walks, fake wigs, fake accents, and fake fighting.
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