FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Gillian Wong, Associated Press
BEIJING - A prominent Chinese government forensic scientist has questioned the cause of death of a murdered British businessman, casting doubt on the official version of a scandal that reached into the upper levels of the Communist Party. In a post to her blog that has since been removed, Wang Xuemei, a forensic expert with the top prosecutors' agency, said official accounts lack sufficient evidence that Neil Heywood died from cyanide poisoning, which she describes as leaving the body obviously discolored.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WITH PLENTY of preening self-portraits and pointless chatter with friends, 17-year-old Nasheen K. Anderson's Twitter feed at first looks like that of any typical teenager. But it doesn't take long before you find some jaw-dropping stuff. In one photo Anderson posted, a cat rests its head on a man's erect penis. Another shows a woman squirting milk from her naked breast into a coffee mug. Others show extreme close-ups of women's naked genitalia, Anderson flashing gang signs or showing a handgun jammed beneath a mattress, and a "family photo shoot" of a smiling woman pointing a handgun at four beaming school-age children.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A 22-year-old Bensalem Township man who found an extra $69,300 mistakenly deposited into his bank account surrendered today on charges he spent most of the money. Police said Joseph Bucci, of the 3300 block West End Avenue in Trevose, used the money to buy food, clothing, furniture, a vehicle, airline tickets and a pet dog. Bucci was charged with theft and receiving stolen property, both third-degree felonies. Police said Wells Fargo accidentally deposited the money in his account but by the time the bank discovered the error, he only had $2,000 remaining.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2016
Exelon Corp., the Chicago energy firm that owns Peco Energy Co., has named Maggie FitzPatrick senior vice president of corporate affairs, philanthropy, and customer engagement. She had been global chief communication officer and vice president of public affairs at Johnson & Johnson. FitzPatrick will have oversight of communications, brand strategy, and customer engagement. She also will oversee the distribution of nearly $40 million in annual giving by Exelon. Danielle Block has been hired as director of health-care services at Melmark, a Berwyn nonprofit that provides a range of services for disabled adults and children.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com
A West Chester man was charged this afternoon in a scheme to embezzle employee pension funds from an investment banking firm to prop up a Florida company in which he was an investor. The indictment said Harris M. DeWese, 69, who was the CEO of Compass Capital Partners, Ltd., formerly located in Radnor, embezzled more than $536,000 from Compass' pension plan between October 2006 and October 2007. DeWese was a trustee of the pension plan and allegedly owned a 40 percent stake in a printing company in Tampa, Fla. After the company, Hillsboro Printing, began having financial difficulties, DeWese allegedly used the Compass pension plan's funds to keep Hillsboro's operations afloat.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's going out on a limb, and there's your limb going out. Or you putting out your limb. Angelina Jolie did, and now it's leg-endary. Jolie put out her right leg repeatedly before and during Sunday's Academy Award presentations, and it instantly became an object for satire and sharing. Funny guy Jim Rash, one of the recipients of the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar, struck a Joliesque pose onstage in his tux. Now, it has become an Internet meme - complete with a Twitter account: @AngiesRightLeg.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
THE OWNER of a now-defunct Feasterville law firm, Debbie Carlitz, told a federal judge yesterday that admitted fraudster Bonnie Sweeten stole her payroll checks and deposited them into her own personal account. Sweeten, 41, who was the office manager at the law firm, had been expected to be sentenced yesterday, but attorneys for the government and Sweeten spent all day arguing over how much money that Sweeten, who worked at the law firm from 2005 to 2009, stole. The feds say more than $1.1 million; the defense says $948,077.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
No community in the Philadelphia region has been harder hit by the foreclosure crisis than Willingboro. Read an account of who has been affected and how foreclosures have hurt other local towns in Sunday's Inquirer.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A top official in the city's Division of Technology was fired Wednesday for accepting dozens of free meals from Verizon and other city contractors over a four-year period and secretly setting up a Verizon business-rewards account that provided him and others with $48,000 in gifts. Joseph James Sr., who held a $124,800-a-year job as deputy chief information officer for communications and operations, was personally informed of his dismissal by Managing Director Richard Negrin and escorted from his office on the 18th floor of 1234 Market St. Another official in the same department, Concetta D. Lilly-Pearson, was demoted and suspended for 20 days from her $88,351-a-year position for accepting a more limited number of meals and gifts.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2012
The Center for Autism, a nonprofit Philadelphia autism treatment and evaluation center, hired Joel Bregman as medical director. He had been executive director at the Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.       Widerman & Co., an independent insurance and risk management firm, hired Mark C. Phander as business development manager....
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
City Council took steps Thursday to extend one of the state's most lucrative tax breaks to dozens of new properties. But it also passed legislation to require more robust reporting from businesses that receive that subsidy and others, with the goal of better gauging the payoff. In adding about 80 properties to the state's Keystone Opportunity Zone (KOZ) program, city officials said, they are looking to spur development in places otherwise likely to remain bare. "These are undeveloped sites that have been waiting for an extra push to get them to the finish line," said Duane Bumb, the city's senior deputy director of commerce.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2016
Exelon Corp., the Chicago energy firm that owns Peco Energy Co., has named Maggie FitzPatrick senior vice president of corporate affairs, philanthropy, and customer engagement. She had been global chief communication officer and vice president of public affairs at Johnson & Johnson. FitzPatrick will have oversight of communications, brand strategy, and customer engagement. She also will oversee the distribution of nearly $40 million in annual giving by Exelon. Danielle Block has been hired as director of health-care services at Melmark, a Berwyn nonprofit that provides a range of services for disabled adults and children.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Tom Marino
By Tom Marino The Department of Justice has proven time and again that it cannot act as an unbiased enforcer of the law when it comes to investigating the corrupt Clinton machine. Instead, the attorney general and the political appointees at the Justice Department have acted as a political arm for President Obama and his administration. Their actions have continuously ignored our rule of law in order to protect Hillary Clinton and the White House. Unfortunately, this is not speculation.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
I've got my fingers crossed so tightly for Roger Vanderklok, I think I've busted some knuckles. That's how much I want his lawsuit against the Transportation Security Administration to go to trial already. I have no doubt a jury would hand Vanderklok some long-overdue justice. As a happy consequence, a ruling in Vanderklok's favor could change the way travelers experience airport-security screening. I'll get to that in a sec. But first, let me refresh your memory about Vanderklok's saga, which I detailed in a column last year . On Jan. 26, 2013, Vanderklok, now 60, a Philly architect and avid runner, went through the security screening area of Terminal B at Philly International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have been together for eight years. When we first met, I was in the military, and she was a bartender. Needless to say, she made far more money than I did at the time. Six months into our relationship, she got pregnant and quit her job. For the next seven years, she raised our children and went to school while I did whatever I had to do - working two jobs - to make enough to pay the bills. I am now out of the military. I have been at a company for six years, and we are finally reaching a point where we don't worry about money as much.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I've been dating my boyfriend for 11 months. It's the best relationship I have ever been in, and I love him. Last weekend, he found out about a social media account I didn't tell him about and got very upset. He found out when I showed him a cute kitten post on the site, so it wasn't so much a secret as an omission. He says that this has made him reconsider our whole relationship and that he doesn't feel like he knows me at all anymore.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Hydraulically fractured wells now produce about two-thirds of the nation's natural gas output, up from less than 7 percent in 2000, according to an analysis released Thursday by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The EIA's report follows on a March analysis that showed fracking accounts for about half of current U.S. crude oil production. The last decade's dramatic increases of domestic gas and crude oil production from fracking has contributed to a decine in energy prices.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
WHEN I read Jenice Armstrong's article concerning Ebony magazine and Bill Cosby, I wanted to applaud both the magazine and her for the cultural honesty. I am a 70-year-old black male who has been deeply involved in the civil-rights movement, from the late 1960s to the present, although I am less active because of my medical problems. It has become increasingly clear that too many of our people, including those of renown and stature, refuse to allow us as a race to be honest and truthful in all our facts about persons of color who are celebrities (Cosby, O.J. Simpson, etc.)
SPORTS
April 20, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The straw that sent the camel of Jeff Lurie's patience to the ground last season fell during Chip Kelly's final press conference as Eagles coach, although no one knew at the time that his three-year shrugfest was over. Heading into the season-ending game against the Giants, carrying the burden of a 6-9 record, Kelly was asked if his dual roles as coach and personnel boss had been too much to handle. "I'm not the general manager, so I don't run our personnel department. I'm not in charge of scouting," Kelly said.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
By Michael E. Kraft Most of us recognize the value of science in dealing with complex problems that pose significant risks to public health and well-being. Thus we expect reputable science to be reported and used in helping us make difficult policy choices, such as what to do about climate change. Scientific findings and associated uncertainties should be scrutinized carefully and debated vigorously within the scientific community and among the public. However, denying the best scientific evidence we have could lead to greater societal harm than if we had taken sensible action when reliable knowledge was first available.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|