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Accreditation

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NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Theresa Sullivan Barger, Special to The Inquirer
Abington Memorial Hospital has become the first hospital in Montgomery County to receive accreditation as a trauma center from the Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation, a nonprofit agency established to monitor trauma centers statewide. To receive accreditation, a center must meet strict criteria established by the foundation, including a surgeon and operating room team standing by, an ability to handle patients from arrival to rehabilitation and a program for continuing education for medical and support staff, according to Carol B. Forrester, foundation director.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University's accreditation crisis, which has caused a significant drop in enrollment at the troubled state university, may be over next month, Cheyney President LeVerne McCummings said yesterday. A college-accrediting team visited the campus in Delaware County last week to help determine whether Cheyney had made sufficient improvements in the last 18 months to retain its accreditation. The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, the regional accrediting agency based in Philadelphia, voted in March 1985 to suspend the accreditation pending an appeal by the university.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | By Andrea Hartley, Special to The Inquirer
Hampton Hospital in Rancocas, which opened its doors in September as the first psychiatric hospital built in New Jersey since 1910, recently received accreditation by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. "We are proud that Hampton Hospital has achieved a three-year accreditation, the maximum length of time any facility can be awarded," said Charles A. Dackis, the hospital's medical director. The hospital, located on the Rancocas-Mount Holly Road, received the accreditation after evaluation by a team consisting of a psychiatrist, a psychiatric nurse and a psychiatric administrator, according to Ed Frye, spokesman for the joint commission.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Looking for excess fat in an already lean budget, a Morrisville school board member has suggested doing away with accreditation for the middle-senior high school. "I really wonder whether this is worth having," board member John Buckman said Wednesday at a board meeting, questioning the expense of applying for accreditation from the Middle States Association of Schools and Colleges. The school has enjoyed a high rating from the Middle States Association - an independent, nonprofit accrediting agency - for at least 12 years.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Penncrest High School principal Louis Scott informed the Rose Tree Media school board Thursday night of plans to prepare the high school for its 10- year accreditation evaluation, which the school failed last time. Scott told the board that a steering committee had been appointed and was forming staff committees to address the areas that would be evaluated by representatives of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools during their visit to the school. Those areas are school and community, philosophy and goals, and school facilities.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After three years of internal audits, the township Police Department is preparing for a review for accreditation by a national nonprofit agency that sets standards for ethical and efficient police work. A regional committee of the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies will review the department's every move from today until Wednesday. The department is the first in South Jersey to be inspected by the commission. "It helps professionalize the agency," said Lt. Tim Richardson, Burlington Township Police Department spokesman.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Dublin school system has become one of only 17 districts in Pennsylvania to win accreditation for all grade levels from the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The Sandy Run Middle School was formally granted accreditation on Oct. 16 after the independent organization, made up of educators from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York and Delaware, reviewed the school's goals and curriculum. Sandy Run Principal Valerie Mahla said at Monday's school board meeting that representatives of Middle States would return to the school next year to evaluate how it was meeting its five-year goals.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ten years ago, when the Upper Dublin School District last sought re- accreditation, district members dusted off a 500-page book filled with multiple-choice questionnaires for faculty and administrators to answer. Today, they're talking to the parents. The Upper Dublin school board is asking at least 58 parents and nine community members to help it prepare an 18-month comprehensive evaluation of the district for an experimental program it has developed to seek re- accreditation with the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University President LeVerne McCummings yesterday called the unconditional renewal of the school's accreditation "absolutely fantastic," saying, "we've worked hard for it and I think we earned it. " Gaining full accreditation marks the end of a tough struggle for the Delaware County college, which was first threatened with losing its accreditation in 1985. "The school has made significant progress to gain that decision," Howard L. Simmons, executive director of the Commission of Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | By Tamara Henry, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Huntly Collins contributed to this article
A Philadelphia-based educational accrediting agency, criticized by the administration for allegedly discriminating against whites and males by requiring diversity on campuses, won an initial battle yesterday to keep its authority to evaluate colleges. A federal advisory committee voted 6-2 to recommend reauthorization of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools for a four-year period, instead of the maximum five years. Members also agreed to require annual reports on any negative evaluations based on the organization's controversial "diversity standard.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's lengthy budget impasse has caused the commission that accredits colleges regionally to question Temple and three other area universities about their ability to stay in compliance without a collective $600 million in state funding they have yet to receive. Temple, Pennsylvania State and Lincoln Universities, and the University of Pittsburgh must by April 10 provide a report on the effect the budget impasse has had on their operations, and detail their contingency plans.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three families of Somerset County crime victims have vowed they will fight efforts by the county Prosecutor's Office to seek accreditation from the New Jersey Association of Chiefs of Police. Anita Kavanaugh said she wanted to know who killed her husband in March, when he was run over while waiting for a ride. Kerry Gordon said she wanted a restraining order enforced after her husband put a gun to her head in 2010. Mark Sheridan said he expected a thorough investigation after his parents, Cooper University Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife, Joyce, were found dead, both repeatedly stabbed, in 2014.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University, which has been running a deficit and experienced a 30 percent enrollment drop this year, has been placed on probation by the body that accredits colleges and universities. The historically black university, on the boundary between Chester and Delaware Counties, has two years to correct financial concerns raised by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education or face losing accreditation. That loss would mean that the university's students no longer would be eligible for state or federal financial aid. Frank G. Pogue, interim president of Cheyney, and Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, of which Cheyney is part, said they were committed to fixing the problems.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, when Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey assembled a unit of officers tasked with modernizing the Philadelphia Police Department, he didn't mince words about the seriousness of the assignment. "Your career depends on this," he told Lt. Stephen Clark, whom he had appointed to head the unit. On Wednesday, flanked by Clark and other department officials, Ramsey announced the results of that unit's work: The department has won accreditation from the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania State University got some good news this week: the Middle States Commission on Higher Education found the school in full compliance with requirements and took it off the warning list. "Our university's accreditation is solid," Penn State President Rodney Erickson told the board of trustees at a meeting Friday afternoo The commission gave Penn State a warning in August in the wake of a report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh's group that found top university administrators conspired to cover up child sex abuse allegations by its former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years in prison in October.
SPORTS
August 20, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORK UNION, Va. - Amid the padless pandemonium of summer-camp drills involving 100-plus players, few reacted to Christian Hackenberg's shouted signals Thursday night, the quarterback's confident utterances muffled by the competing noise on Fork Union Military Academy's isolated practice fields. Curiously though, beyond this remote Shenandoah Mountain institution that has served as a football finishing school for talents like Mike Quick, Eddie George, and Vinny Testaverde, the high-schooler's every signal is being intensely scrutinized.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even though Pennsylvania State University got yet another stern warning Monday, it is highly unlikely that the university will lose its accreditation as a result of the child sex-abuse scandal involving a former assistant football coach, national experts said. "Unthinkable. Unimaginable," said Molly Corbett Broad, president of the American Council on Education, which represents presidents of colleges and universities and leaders of other higher education-related organizations. "It's a great university.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An accrediting body has warned Pennsylvania State University that its status "is in jeopardy" following recent developments in the Jerry Sandusky scandal and that it needs to take steps to preserve its accreditation. University leaders expressed confidence Monday that Penn State would address all the concerns expressed by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. "This action has nothing to do with the quality of education our students receive. Middle States is focusing on governance, integrity, and financial issues related to information in the Freeh report and other items related to our current situation," said Blannie Bowen, vice provost for academic affairs.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An accrediting body has warned Pennsylvania State University that its status "is in jeopardy" following recent developments in the Jerry Sandusky scandal and that it needs to take steps to save its accreditation. University leaders expressed confidence Monday that Penn State would address all the concerns expressed by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. "This action has nothing to do with the quality of education our students receive. Middle States is focusing on governance, integrity, and financial issues related to information in the Freeh report and other items related to our current situation," said Blannie Bowen, vice provost for academic affairs.
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