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NEWS
November 10, 2011
TRENTON - Amtrak service was halted Wednesday between New York City and Philadelphia after a fatal accident near here. The accident occurred shortly before 1 p.m. and involved an unidentified trespasser who was struck by an Acela Express just west of the Hamilton Township station. None of the 170 passengers and crew aboard the Boston-to-Washington train was hurt. - AP
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has Amtrak abandoned its vision of 220-mile-per-hour bullet trains speeding up and down the Northeast Corridor? The railroad recently issued draft specifications for new trains to replace its existing Acelas that call for 160 m.p.h. trains, not the 220 m.p.h. versions Amtrak said in January that it was seeking. Amtrak and the California High-Speed Rail Authority in January announced they were jointly seeking proposals for trains that could run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and the East Coast.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Train travel between Philadelphia and Boston got 45 minutes faster yesterday. It was the first small step in a series of major improvements that Amtrak, the national passenger railroad, plans to make on its busy Northeast Corridor. The new "Acela Regionals," which began service yesterday, are actually older trains that have been refurbished. They will replace Amtrak's Northeast Direct coach-class service over the next two years. A separate part of Amtrak's new service - the long-awaited 150-mile-an-hour Acela Express train - is scheduled to begin replacing the aging premium-class Metroliner this spring.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak's updated plan for high-speed train travel on the East Coast envisions 37-minute trips between Philadelphia and New York, after a $151 billion redevelopment of the entire Northeast Corridor. Faster service would be phased in gradually, as Amtrak improves existing tracks, signals, bridges, and power lines and then builds a separate high-speed corridor between Washington and Boston to accommodate trains traveling at 220 m.p.h. In a report released Monday, Amtrak revised its projections for costs, ridership, and the alignment of its proposed new 438-mile high-speed corridor.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak service to New York City is resuming Thursday evening, with modified schedules and expected delays. People can now make reservations for trips between New York City and points south, including Trenton and Philadelphia, after storm flooding from Sandy had cut off access to Penn Station in Manhattan. Only three trains will make the trip into New York City tonight, an Amtrak spokesman said, with another train scheduled for early morning service. Schedules for Friday's train service are expected to be announced late Thursday evening, including for Northeast Regional service between New York City and Boston, and the Acela Express.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All Amtrak service between Philadelphia and New York City is suspended as investigators probe the death of a trespasser on the tracks near Trenton. A southbound Acela Express struck and killed a person about 12:50 p.m. in Hamilton Township. About 170 passengers were aboard the No. 2117 which had left Penn Station in New York at noon and was due in Philadelphia at 1:08. There were no reported injuries to passengers or crew, said an Amtrak spokesman. Contact staff writer Sam Wood at 215-854-2796, samwood@phillynews.com , or @inqwriter on Twitter.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Almost 20 years after fast, slope-nosed trains became commonplace in Europe, rail passengers in this country will begin riding their own version of a speeding bullet for the first time tomorrow. With the launch of its Acela Express service, Amtrak begins a new, uncertain chapter in its beleaguered history. Amtrak is counting on Acela to capture the lucrative business-travel clientele. Most fares will be 15 percent to 20 percent higher than they are on Metroliners. Last year, Metroliners carried a record 2.4 million passengers.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1999 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak yesterday offered the first glimpse of a long-awaited new generation of high-speed trains and revealed the name it will attach to its Northeast Corridor service starting at the end of the year. Amtrak introduced the brand name - Acela, pronounced "ah-CEL-la" - at a pep rally for 1,200 employees near New York's Penn Station, and gave the workers their first look - about a minute of videotape - of one of the trains rolling off a Vermont assembly line. Flanked by eight members of Amtrak's board, railroad president George D. Warrington said the new trains and brand name would be the hallmarks of a rail service far superior to what passengers are accustomed to now. So many travelers will flock to the trains, Warrington predicted, that Amtrak's revenue will go up by $180 million a year.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2001 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak reached the halfway point this week on the introduction of its Acela Express high-speed trains. More of the new trains will be added next month and again in December. By early next year, all 20 of them will be running. They are replacing the venerable premium-fare Metroliner trains between Washington and New York, and extending premium-fare service north of New York City to Boston. The new 150-mile-per-hour trains will get better over the next year. For example, the trains are not yet using a new information system that sends messages to signs on the platform to help passengers boarding trains find cars with empty seats.
NEWS
August 14, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Amtrak benches Acela Express fleet Amtrak pulled all 18 of its high-speed Acela Express trains out of service yesterday after discovering cracks in shock-absorber assemblies, the latest in a summer-long series of financial and public-image blows to the struggling passenger railroad. Eight of the first 10 train sets inspected had problems, spokesman Bill Schulz said. Each train set includes two locomotives, and each locomotive has four of the shock-absorbing "yaw dampers.
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NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AMTRAK PLANS to install internal cameras on its trains in the Northeast Corridor, allowing them to monitor train engineers, the corporation announced yesterday. The new safety measure follows the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188, which left eight passengers dead and about 200 injured. An investigation led by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the train sped up from 70 to 102 mph as it approached a curve near Frankford Junction. A wide-angle camera will be added to each locomotive's cab, focusing on the engineer and the control console, Amtrak Spokesman Craig Schulz said.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Samantha Melamed, and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amtrak and SEPTA trains were scheduled to roll again early Monday over newly restored rail lines that replaced those mangled by the derailment last week of a Washington-to-New York commuter train. Both transit agencies said a monumental repair effort since Tuesday's fatal accident at Frankford Junction had enabled service restoration to tens of thousands of commuters left stranded by the outage. "Amtrak staff and crew have been working around the clock to repair the infrastructure necessary to restore service for all the passengers who travel along the Northeast Corridor," said Amtrak CEO Joe Boardman in announcing the restoration.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The implosion of arguably the greatest core in Phillies history is going to start in a fitting place. James Calvin Rollins, the homegrown triggerman for a franchise that won five straight division titles and the 2008 World Series, was the first of the talented ensemble to arrive in the big leagues at the turn of the century, and, according to multiple reports, he will become the first to go when he is traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers. The deal was not official Wednesday night, but nothing more than formalities was holding it up. Jimmy Rollins, 36, will not be the last fading star to be removed from the roster this offseason as general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. attempts to inject a youth movement that he hopes represents the foundation for the next great era in Phillies history.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak is investigating how an Acela Express train to Philadelphia and Washington left New York City's Penn Station without 85 passengers. The New York Daily News quoted one passenger as saying ticket holders were sent to the wrong platform, but Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz described the problem only as an apparent miscommunication "between the train crew and the station staff, which resulted in the train departing before all passengers could board....
BUSINESS
August 1, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak trains have been late nearly 30 percent of the time in the last 12 months, considerably worse than the year before. Part of the problem, Amtrak says, is that most of its routes operate on tracks owned and controlled by freight railroads. And a federal-court decision last year - which is now headed to the U.S. Supreme Court - undercut Amtrak's ability to compel freight operators to give priority to passenger trains. In the 12 months ending in June, only two of 33 Amtrak routes met the railroad's nationwide goal of 85.5 percent on-time performance.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak and California have ended their effort to jointly buy high-speed trains for the West Coast and the Northeast Corridor. A meeting with train manufacturers in Philadelphia this month convinced officials that the needs of the Northeast and California - including top speeds and route configurations - were just too different. The California High-Speed Rail Authority is planning to operate 220 m.p.h. trains on a newly built corridor between San Francisco and Los Angeles by 2029.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Amtrak's planned new Acela Express trains will carry more passengers and be more reliable than the current ones, even if they won't travel much faster, Amtrak president Joseph Boardman said Thursday. Amtrak is seeking proposals, with the California High-Speed Rail Authority, for new high-speed trains that can run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and 160 miles an hour on the Northeast Corridor. Proposals from train-builders are due by May 17. A builder will be selected by the end of the year, Boardman said.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The good news: the sun is shining, pavements are dry, and skies are clear. The bad news: it's extremely cold. By late morning Tuesday, delays and cancellations that crimped some travel during the morning commute had improved. The subzero temperatures that broke records for the date in places like Chicago, at minus 16, had a ripple affect on flights at Philadelphia International Airport. Due to reduced flight schedules in other cities, arriving flights from Chicago and Boston early Tuesday "might have been delayed or canceled," said Philadelphia airport spokeswoman Victoria Lupica.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Amtrak service between Philadelphia and Washington was disrupted Monday evening because of power-line problems in Wilmington that started around 6:15 p.m. and were continuing. Also, Amtrak announced it will reduce its Tuesday schedule between Washington and Boston because of the extreme cold moving into the region. Service finally resumed between Philadelphia and Washington around 11:30 p.m., though residual delays were expected, Amtrak announced via Twitter. The stoppage originally was between Philadelphia and Baltimore, but was extended to Washington because of the service backup.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has Amtrak abandoned its vision of 220-mile-per-hour bullet trains speeding up and down the Northeast Corridor? The railroad recently issued draft specifications for new trains to replace its existing Acelas that call for 160 m.p.h. trains, not the 220 m.p.h. versions Amtrak said in January that it was seeking. Amtrak and the California High-Speed Rail Authority in January announced they were jointly seeking proposals for trains that could run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and the East Coast.
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