CollectionsAchievements
IN THE NEWS

Achievements

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The past achievements, present conditions and future concerns of women will be highlighted in local programs marking the annual observance of Women's History Month, which is March. "The point of the month is to have educational-type programs highlight all the different ways that women have been ignored in history," said Judy Buckman, vice president and past president of the Moorestown-based Alice Paul Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW). "Women's History Month started out as Women's History Week," said Barbara Irvine, president of the Alice Paul Centennial Foundation, a national group based in Mount Laurel that seeks to publicize the achievements of women's right activist Alice Paul (1885-1977)
NEWS
February 9, 2011
Steven F. Hayward cites two "achievements" in his column about Ronald Reagan ("There's substance behind the acclaim," Sunday.) One, Reagan vanquished "all talk of the presidency as an inadequate institution. " People have been saying that the presidency isn't what it used to be since George Washington returned to Mount Vernon. That aside, as evidence of how Reagan restored "trust and confidence" in the presidency, Hayward referred to a poll of "presidential scholars. " I can't help but wonder who these scholars were, how the questions were asked, and other facets of polling that often render results meaningless.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's prestigious John Scott Award for scientific achievement was given Friday to two renowned scientists, Alfred G. Knudson and Benoit B. Mandelbrot. Knudson, 77, a geneticist and physician at Fox Chase Cancer Center, was chosen for his seminal contributions to understanding the genetic origins of cancer. Based on his studies of a rare childhood cancer called retinoblastoma, he was the first to understand that a person who inherits a mutated gene for cancer still needs another "hit," or mutation, to develop a tumor.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
The notion of a retrospective like "Camden County Artists, 1844-1944" has a long history. Locally, the pacesetter for such cultural-heritage displays was the Philadelphia Museum of Art's 1976 Bicentennial exhibit, "300 Years of American Art," which exhibited work by local luminaries in painting, sculpture, crafts and architecture, and documented their achievements in a book-length catalogue that is now the standard survey text in its field. The show in Haddon Township makes a praiseworthy start at tallying the county's artistic achievement.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Five Chester High School students and six adults were honored for their achievements and their contributions to the community at the Chester NAACP's annual dinner Friday. Before about 450 people at Septembers Place in Springfield, Chester NAACP treasurer Delores R. Shelton presented awards to Chester seniors Albert Irving Layton, Lisa Gonzalez, Tamika Hayward, Lamar Jackson and Jocelyn Kea. Shelton noted that all five had received many honors in high school and numerous offers from colleges.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Stacey Mannon writes down one of her achievements on a wall-size banner at Jenkintown Elementary. On Monday night, 150 women and girls crowded the cafeteria to write down their achievements as part of an event to mark Women's History Month.
NEWS
September 4, 1986
The reports of parts of human bodies being shipped across the country are calculated to shock us. We accept the achievements of medical science but recoil before the anatomical studies that necessarily underlie them. Do you remember Dr. Rock in Dylan Thomas' script The Doctor and the Devils? Alice H. Frey Wayne.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Just how much Kathleen Ruben's Girl Scout troop knew about the contributions of women throughout history soon became apparent after they started working on a new scout badge, "Learning About Women. " Although they knew of the achievements of a lot of men, the third graders in Troop 97 in Marlton didn't know much about the accomplishments of women, said Ruben, the leader of Troop 97 and a member of the Alice Paul chapter of the National Organization for Women. "Even those of us who are chapter members may not know as much as we should about the contributions of women," said Ruben.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Last year, it was Sister Mary Scullion, Philadelphia's tireless advocate for the homeless. Who should be The Inquirer's 2012 Citizen of the Year? Nominate someone who helped the city, state, or nation in an effective, creative way. E-mail a brief description of his or her achievements to kboyer@phillynews.com , with "Citizen" in the subject line. Or mail it to Citizen of the Year, The Inquirer, 801 Market St., Suite 300, Philadelphia 19107. The deadline is Dec. 7.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Wednesday announced a new financial-aid scholarship that will cut nearly in half the cost of college for high-achieving students and could improve the school's competitive edge. The new Gateway Scholarship will offer $30,000 per year for four years and be open to first-year full-time students for fall 2017. To qualify, students must get at least a 1260 combined reading and math score on their SAT or a composite score of 28 on their ACT, and meet college-prep-level course requirements at Ursinus, a liberal arts college in Collegeville with an enrollment of 1,650.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
By Cynthia Terrell and Susannah Wellford With the convening of the Democratic and Republican Parties, we see greater diversity in their national delegations and leadership than what we currently have in Congress. Women hold less than 20 percent of the seats in the Senate and House, making the United States 95th internationally in the number of women elected to national offices. Imagine if the Senate or House required gender parity for each state? Before completely dismissing this idea, consider this: Both parties already have statewide and national rules requiring gender equality.
SPORTS
July 14, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
IN A DIFFERENT time, when I was more naïve about the dramatic effects of performance-enhancing drugs, I guess I would have been impressed by the spectacular display by Miami Marlins rightfielder Giancarlo Stanton during Monday's Home Run Derby. I might have even believed the 61 home runs Stanton smashed out of Petco Park were "spectacular. " Even though the purpose of the contest is to intentionally deliver pitches that batters can blast out of ballpark, the fact Stanton destroyed the previous single-night mark of 41 set by then-Phillie Bobby Abreu in 2005 was amazing in terms of record-breaking margins for any event.
NEWS
July 3, 2016
99 Poems New and Selected By Dana Gioia Graywolf Press. 194 pp. $24. Poetry as Enchantment By Dana Gioia Wiseblood Books. 36 pp. $5. Reviewed by Frank Wilson 'It is significant," Dana Gioia writes in Poetry as Enchantment , "that the Latin word for poetry, carmen , is also the word the Romans used for a song, a magic spell, a religious incantation, or a prophecy - all verbal constructions whose auditory powers can produce a magical effect on the listener.
SPORTS
July 1, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
AT THE 2011 Masters, Australian Jason Day closed with two birdies to finish tied for second, two behind South Africa's Charl Schwartzel, who birdied the last four holes. And two months later he got another second at the U.S. Open, eight in back of runaway winner Rory McIlroy. The previous August, Day had tied for 10th at the PGA Championship in his second major. But that April in Augusta, most people still didn't really know who the then-23-year-old was or what he might have in him. Golf is littered with guys who do something and are mostly never heard from again.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By James Waller Zalman Gradowski, a Jew from Luna in the district of Grodno, on the border of Lithuania and Poland (present-day Belarus), arrived in Auschwitz on the morning of Dec. 8, 1942. Upon arrival, his mother, wife, two sisters, brother-in-law, and father-in-law were taken immediately to the gas chambers. Gradowski, an able-bodied man, was assigned to the Sonderkommando squad, the prisoners who serviced the crematoria by pulling out the bodies, plundering the corpses, burning the remains, and disposing of the ashes.
SPORTS
April 30, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, STAFF WRITER
The giant screen that sits high atop the field at the Penn Relays is there for a reason. On Thursday evening, Haddonfield Memorial junior Briana Gess used it to sneak a peek at Weini Kelati, the Heritage (Leesburg, Va.) junior who flirted with the Relays Record (9 minutes, 15.3 seconds) during the girls' 3,000 meters. Kelati finished in 9:19.91. "She's just incredible," Gess said. "I was watching her on the screen when I was running. " Gess, competing by herself for the first time at the Relays, finished 12th overall (9:50.95)
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 9, ACHIEVEability hosted Food for Thought at Urban Outfitters at the Navy Yard. The event, attended by 600 supporters, including Mayor Kenney, celebrated the organization's 35 years of breaking the generational cycle of poverty. The crowd enjoyed drinks, dancing, and sampling dishes from more than 25 local restaurants. ACHIEVEability is a member of the Mission First Housing Group, a nonprofit organization that assists low-income, single-parent, and homeless Philadelphia families to become self-sufficient.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As Mayor Kenney looks to spend millions on rehabbing Philadelphia libraries, parks, and recreation centers, City Council on Tuesday looked to ensure the workforce on those projects, and other city jobs, is diverse. Under legislation approved by a Council committee, the office that tracks workers' wages would also track diversity on job sites. Contractors who don't comply by trying to reach diversity goals could be barred from future city work. But compliance is not cut and dried.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
When Jalaal Hayes of North Philadelphia applied to a doctoral program in applied chemistry, even the admissions staff at Delaware State University did a double take. Hayes was but 18. Surely he had mistakenly checked the box next to graduate school. His application was dispatched to the undergraduate division. Eventually, it came back. The teenager, who had graduated from high school at 15, and from college at 18 - with two bachelor's degrees, no less - knew exactly what he was doing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|