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Acid Rain

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NEWS
July 5, 1986
Environmental organizations around the country are using this week's Statue of Liberty restoration festivities to make a pertinent point: Unless strong acid-rain controls are put in place soon, the statue may not be around for its bicentennial. The toll of acidic precipitation on structures like the statue is immediately apparent. The damage is widespread, but some states such as Pennsylvania, which receives the most acidic rainfall in the United States, are beginning to see an obvious impact.
NEWS
November 16, 1986
Listening to his message, it might have been easy to figure Edward B. Leisenring Jr. to be some out-of-place environmentalist as he addressed the Virginia Coal Council recently. He was telling his audience to get behind passage of an acid-rain control bill, legislation that the industry has vigorously opposed in past years. Edward Leisenring isn't some mouthpiece for environmentalists, however. He is the chairman of Westmoreland Coal Co., based in Philadelphia, and that's what makes his message to Eastern coal executives particularly interesting.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
Congressional negotiators reached agreement early yesterday on a plan to cut acid rain, the last major issue that had to be resolved to clear the way for enactment of the first overhaul of the nation's clean-air laws in 13 years. The agreement would order electric utilities in the industrial Midwest and Southeast to cut by half the emissions of sulfur dioxide. That is the main ingredient in acid rain, which has left thousands of lakes and streams too acidified to support life.
NEWS
July 15, 1986
As owner of 70 million acres of timberland, the forest products industry has as great a stake as anyone in the health of America's forests. Companies in our industry spend tens of millions of dollars annually in combating threats to the health of forests and improving their productivity. That's why we must set the record straight. In your April 17 editorial "The Sikorski-Conte bill would cure acid rain" you state that "growth of commercial timber is in the decline in the Southeast" because of acid rain.
NEWS
August 9, 1988
It's hard to get folks riled up about what's wrong with the rain in the middle of a drought. But when the rain has darn near turned to vinegar, gnawing on Philadelphia's oldest churches, erasing fish from whole lakes in the Adirondacks, doing a number on people's lungs, well, rain ain't what it used to be. We're talking acid rain, here, the same stuff that the President was talking about the other day when he agreed, after years of foot-dragging, to...
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acid rain is a severe problem that has befouled streams in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, but federal clean-air standards have improved conditions during the last 20 years, a Rutgers University professor said yesterday. Zoologist Mark D. Morgan said that the adoption of clean-air legislation now before Congress would further improve the quality of water in the Pinelands, where acid rain has, through a chemical process, caused streams to become polluted with aluminum. Morgan made his comments before the New Jersey Pinelands Commission, the agency responsible for controlling growth and protecting the fragile environment in the one million acres of once-pristine streams and forests.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Some newfangled devices strapped to the stately old columns of Philadelphia's Merchants' Exchange are beginning to shed new light on the deterioration caused by urban pollution and acid rain. The National Park Service has been studying the way pollutants eat away at historic structures, from the Greek Revival building at 2nd and Walnut streets to the cliff dwellings of the Southwest. The aim: to protect these landmarks from the air pollution that haunts national parks from coast to coast.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | By Patricia Edmonds and Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney looked like old friends yesterday as they credited each other in public for a recent trade pact, but they failed to patch up their disagreement over acid rain when they met behind closed doors. After Reagan again rebuffed Mulroney in his quest for U.S. acid rain controls, the Canadian leader appealed directly to the American people and Congress for help, warning that acid rain was "a rapidly escalating ecological tragedy in this country as well as ours.
NEWS
March 15, 1986
Last year, at the conclusion of their so-called shamrock summit, President Reagan and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney announced a joint study of the acid rain problem plaguing both nations. Although the prime minister had hoped for something more substantive, he agreed to the examination of the environmental effects of airborne pollutants from burning fossil fuels high in sulfur and nitrogen. The study has been completed and it calls on Mr. Reagan to support a five- year, $5 billion program using public and private funds to develop cleaner coal-burning technology.
NEWS
January 20, 1987
When the final chapter on federal acid-rain control is written, it may turn out that what turned the tide was some pitted BMW hoods and a few asthmatic joggers. The environmental consequences of acid rainfall are becoming increasingly apparent and costly, both in terms of property and physical damage. That fact ultimately may force controls on the pollutants, primarily sulfur dioxide, that mix in the atmosphere and return to earth as acid rain. BMW of North America Inc. has stopped shipping its cars through the port of Jacksonville, Fla., because an August rain shower there scarred the finish on 2,000 automobiles, in some cases dissolving the paint down to the metal.
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NEWS
October 2, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
HOMER, ALASKA - Kris Holderied, who directs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, says that the ocean's increasing acidity is "the reason fishermen stop me in the grocery store. " "They say, 'You're with the NOAA lab, what are you doing on ocean acidification?' " Holderied said. "This is a coastal town that depends on this ocean, and this bay. " This town in southwestern Alaska dubs itself the Halibut Fishing Capital of the World. But worries about the changing chemical balance of the ocean and its impact on the fish has made an arcane scientific buzzword common parlance here, along with the phrase "corrosive waters.
NEWS
June 20, 2010
Maybe Joe Barton finally did it. Maybe the Texas congressman's rash rush to hold BP's hand will wake up Americans to the daunting reality of today's ultrapartisan politics, where nothing is good if it bears the other team's brand. Most Americans are likely pleased that President Obama's measured belligerence led BP to announce a $20 billion escrow fund to aid victims of the Gulf oil spill. Barton, though, had the gall to call the deal a "shakedown," casting the Britons as poor innocents being preyed upon by the voracious Obama.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Tamaccio, 62, a man of conviction who loved this country and Philadelphia yet chose a prison term instead of fighting in Vietnam, died Dec. 21 of lymphoma at Vancouver General Hospital in British Columbia. Mr. Tamaccio moved to Vancouver Island in 2005 after decades as an activist in Philadelphia-area political, environmental and social justice causes, such as opposing nuclear energy and overdevelopment, and advocating clean water and urban housing. A longtime resident of West Mount Airy, Mr. Tamaccio was a sought-after political consultant who got out the vote through door-to-door canvassing of thousands of households, and was a leader for decades in citizen-action groups seeking to change government policies.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2006 | By Frank Greve INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Victory is at hand in the auto industry's 30-year war against rust. No more Ford trucks with tailgates that look like decayed teeth. No more Toyota Celicas with see-through wheel wells. No more VWs with college cafeteria trays covering rusted-out floor pans. "Rust has virtually gone away," declared David Champion, director of automotive testing for Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, the leading U.S. car-buying guide. Tell it to Mike Duran, manager of the Fairfax, Va., franchise for Ziebart, once the nation's busiest rust-proofer.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
LAST MONTH, the state Senate passed the anti-clean car bill (Senate Bill 1025). It blocked the implementation of stronger emissions standards for cars and trucks in the Pennsylvania Clean Vehicles Program. Cars and trucks are responsible for much of the pollutants that cause respiratory problems, affect the acidity of our lakes and streams and contribute to greenhouse gases. Aside from the detrimental effects of emissions pollution such as acid rain and global warming, smog poses serious health threats.
NEWS
February 18, 2005 | By Robin Hoy
This month, Congress is deliberating the fate of the nation's most sweeping clean-air protections, and the Kyoto Protocol goes into effect with the glaring absence of the United States. In his inaugural address, President Bush spoke eloquently about leading with his mandate from the American people. Many among us of religious faith are asking, "Whose mandate is this, anyway?" While many of us helped vote Bush into office, we are dismayed by the plans of his administration - and Congress - to reverse or obstruct programs that protect God's creation.
NEWS
March 29, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the nation's biggest and dirtiest power plants were ordered to begin reducing sulfur dioxide pollution in 1995, the owners of Pennsylvania's Conemaugh plant didn't mess around. They slashed pollution by 95 percent, installing enormous "scrubbers" that turn most of the gas, released from burning coal, into a harmless substance used to make drywall. Yet dozens of other plants across the eastern United States barely reduced pollution at all, and a few spewed out more. A double standard?
NEWS
April 22, 2003 | By Michael S. Berliner
Earth Day is here, and with it a grave danger faces humankind. The danger is not from acid rain, global warming, smog, or the logging of rain forests, as environmentalists would have us believe. The danger is from environmentalism. The fundamental goal of environmentalists is not clean air and water; rather, it is the demolition of technological/industrial civilization. Their goal is not the advancement of human health, happiness, and life; rather, it is a subhuman world where "nature" is worshipped like the totem of some primitive religion.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For three decades, Sunoco's Marcus Hook refinery has depended on General Chemical next door in Claymont, Del., for disposal of toxic waste. But this year, the relationship has turned into a headache for both companies - not to mention the communities affected by pollution from the area's heavy industry. Operations at General Chemical Corp. have been idled three times since January by equipment problems, forcing Sunoco Inc. to choose each time between temporarily shutting its 175,000-barrel-a-day refinery - nearly a quarter of the refiner's overall capacity - and incinerating the waste.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Gov. Whitman has always been quick to defend New Jersey against benighted jesters who had the temerity to poke fun at her state. No Jersey joke - especially one leveled from across the Hudson River - went unchallenged by our cheerleader-in-chief.. . . Remarkable as it may seem, the prospect of promotion to a federal job apparently has chastened our governor. Now that she has been nominated to head the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and faces a vetting and grilling by the Senate, she has gone circumspect on us, eschewing interviews and ignoring provocations that in the past would have been fightin' words.
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