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Acid Reflux

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SPORTS
March 20, 2001 | By Stephen A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 76ers received good news yesterday when they learned that coach Larry Brown, out for medical reasons the last two games, will return tomorrow when he meets the team in Phoenix. Brown, out since Friday night's loss to the Sacramento Kings, visited doctors yesterday. They confirmed what had been suspected by diagnosing acid reflux and a hiatal hernia. His condition will be treated with medication and a new diet - nothing that will force him to miss any more games. Brown, anesthetized during testing yesterday, was asleep at his home and unavailable for comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014
FINALLY, spring has sprung . . . well sort of. And, now, everyone's looking forward to shedding those winter coats and welcoming warmer weather and flirty fashions. One thing's for sure: This is the season when more people become concerned about their excess visceral fat, aka belly fat. While everybody probably knows that men with a 40-inch waist and women with a 35-inch waist are at increased risk of premature death from conditions such as heart disease, dementia, diabetes and some cancers, we also all know that in most cases it is vanity, and not health, behind the quest for a lean midsection.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - An acid reflux drug often used for hard-to-treat asthma doesn't help children with the breathing disease and may cause side effects, a study in 300 children found. The results echo recent research showing that a similar heartburn drug didn't work in adults with asthma. Use of these heavily promoted acid-blocking drugs, called proton pump inhibitors, has more than doubled in U.S. children in recent years, but the study results suggest doctors should put the brakes on that practice, said University of Arizona asthma expert Dr. Fernando Martinez.
NEWS
March 21, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
It seems as if Ashlee Simpson can do no right, right? I mean, the SNL lip-sync bungle. The jig. The acid reflux. The oddball family. Acid reflux alone can stop a career cold. But Ashlee Simpson could do no wrong Saturday night, filling the Tower Theater. Soccer moms, daughters of soccer moms, gangly boy hipster-wannabes, all photographing Ashlee with cell-phone cameras, stood in worship. For their devotion, they got a Simpson who, when not flinging herself across the stage as her thick black mane blew around her head, was talking between songs with a maddening giggle about bad breakups.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A tiny magnetic bracelet implanted at the base of the throat is greatly improving life for some people with chronic heartburn who need more help than medicine can give them. It's a novel way to treat severe acid reflux, which plagues millions of Americans and can raise their risk for more serious health problems. It happens when a weak muscle doesn't close after swallowing as it should. That lets stomach juices splash back into the throat. Drugs such as Nexium and Prilosec reduce acid.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Telephone counseling helps Asian immigrants stop smoking Even though talk therapy is not a familiar concept to recent Asian immigrants to this country, telephone counseling is an effective way to help them quit smoking, a new study shows. University of California-San Diego researchers developed a telephone "quit line" script that was culturally tailored to Asian attitudes and translated into Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese. The new quit lines were then advertised in Asian media outlets throughout California.
SPORTS
March 17, 2001 | By Stephen A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 76ers' near flawless-ride toward possible postseason glory took yet another ominous turn last night, when the team announced that coach Larry Brown would miss at least the next two games due to pain and discomfort in his chest. Following a 100-79 shellacking at the hands of the Sacramento Kings at the First Union Center, Brown acknowledged that tests done one day earlier revealed some potential problems. He said that he would go through further tests on Monday before announcing that he "might miss" the next two games - tonight in Milwaukee and Monday in Seattle.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carly Sokach didn't have much interest in research. For her, it was simply an obligatory requirement for her to apply to medical school. But that changed this summer when the University of Pennsylvania rising junior began working on research that inspired her: She studied whether a questionnaire could tell doctors if a patient with ulcerative colitis was in remission, rather than resorting to a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure. She spent much of her time talking to patients who had the disease.
SPORTS
March 17, 2001 | by Phil Jasner Daily News Sports Writer
The 76ers' leaders are down. Forget whatever significance last night's 100-79 loss to the Sacramento Kings might have. The Sixers left for tonight's game in Milwaukee without coach Larry Brown and All-Star guard Allen Iverson. The news on Iverson was no surprise, because he has struggled with a painful left hip pointer that has severely hurt his ability to move comfortably on the court. But the Sixers' world was jolted by the news Brown would miss tonight's game and Monday night's game in Seattle, and possibly the remainder of the four-game trip, to undergo medical testing Monday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014
FINALLY, spring has sprung . . . well sort of. And, now, everyone's looking forward to shedding those winter coats and welcoming warmer weather and flirty fashions. One thing's for sure: This is the season when more people become concerned about their excess visceral fat, aka belly fat. While everybody probably knows that men with a 40-inch waist and women with a 35-inch waist are at increased risk of premature death from conditions such as heart disease, dementia, diabetes and some cancers, we also all know that in most cases it is vanity, and not health, behind the quest for a lean midsection.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acid reflux disease was making Jeff Pugh's life miserable. Like millions of Americans, he took medications to suppress and counteract the digestive juices that backed up from his stomach into his esophagus. But drugs don't address a basic underlying problem: the esophageal muscle that acts as a valve between the stomach and esophagus gets too weak or loose to shut out the acids. For Pugh, 45, of West Norriton, the fix was a recently approved device - a tiny necklace of magnetic titanium beads that encircle the lower esophagus.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carly Sokach didn't have much interest in research. For her, it was simply an obligatory requirement for her to apply to medical school. But that changed this summer when the University of Pennsylvania rising junior began working on research that inspired her: She studied whether a questionnaire could tell doctors if a patient with ulcerative colitis was in remission, rather than resorting to a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure. She spent much of her time talking to patients who had the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion of unhelpful help with a newborn: Comment: Didn't cook. Didn't clean. Didn't hold the baby. Didn't do laundry. Went out when the baby was sleeping so I could "rest," when what I needed was someone to stay with him so I could rest. My husband worked, shopped, cooked, cleaned, and did laundry for all of us while I made my way into insomnia and postpartum depression. Comment: When my second child was born, my father-in-law and his wife came to "help," which happened to coincide with the baby's massive acid reflux.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A tiny magnetic bracelet implanted at the base of the throat is greatly improving life for some people with chronic heartburn who need more help than medicine can give them. It's a novel way to treat severe acid reflux, which plagues millions of Americans and can raise their risk for more serious health problems. It happens when a weak muscle doesn't close after swallowing as it should. That lets stomach juices splash back into the throat. Drugs such as Nexium and Prilosec reduce acid.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
By Heidi Julavits Doubleday. 284 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Katie Haegele Have you ever had a professional enemy? Not a competitor, necessarily (or merely), more like a villain whose hate for you is inexplicable and partly obscured, who sends dirty looks and undermining jabs your way. If so, you know that bad intentions can have a power of their own. In Heidi Julavits' anticipated new novel The Vanishers , which she will discuss Tuesday night at the Free Library of Philadelphia, the bad vibes are so bad, they're supernatural.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Telephone counseling helps Asian immigrants stop smoking Even though talk therapy is not a familiar concept to recent Asian immigrants to this country, telephone counseling is an effective way to help them quit smoking, a new study shows. University of California-San Diego researchers developed a telephone "quit line" script that was culturally tailored to Asian attitudes and translated into Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese. The new quit lines were then advertised in Asian media outlets throughout California.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - An acid reflux drug often used for hard-to-treat asthma doesn't help children with the breathing disease and may cause side effects, a study in 300 children found. The results echo recent research showing that a similar heartburn drug didn't work in adults with asthma. Use of these heavily promoted acid-blocking drugs, called proton pump inhibitors, has more than doubled in U.S. children in recent years, but the study results suggest doctors should put the brakes on that practice, said University of Arizona asthma expert Dr. Fernando Martinez.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
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