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NEWS
December 3, 2002
EVER USE this brand of shorthand? In deciding what you think of an issue, you look to see who's for it and who's against it - at least to get started. If retiring Congressmen Bob Barr and Dick Armey - or their colleague Henry Hyde - were against something, liberals would be for it. Yet the war on civil liberties - er, terrorism - has removed that simple short cut. Since Sept. 11 , Attorney General John Ashcroft has moved to put increasing numbers Americans under surveillance without benefit of court orders, harnessing new technologies to track the buying and reading habits, as well as the travel itineraries, of ordinary citizens.
NEWS
September 27, 1988
Quick, what do the following people have in common: astronomer Carl Sagan, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, D.C., and former American Bar Association president Chesterfield Smith? Time's up. They're not only American Civil Liberties Union sympathizers. They're on its national advisory council! That's ACLU, in case you don't recognize it written out. George Bush is banking that voters will take his shorthand description of that organization as a bunch of left-wingers, maybe even Commies, since they're "card-carrying" types.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | By I.F. STONE, From the New York Times
When Vice Pesident George Bush, before the Republican platform committee, called Gov. Michael S. Dukakis "a card-carrying member of the American Civil Liberties Union," he injected into the campaign a pale whiff of the witch- hunting McCarthyite '50s. How desperate Bush must be to become so shrill and so ill-advised! The accusation might be hot stuff at Yale's Skull and Bones but it's too esoteric to set Peoria ablaze, where few have ever heard of the ACLU. Does Bush think it's subversive to care enough about the First Amendment to join an organization devoted to its preservation?
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Cynthia Burton contributed to this report
Downingtown public school officials seem hellbent on bedeviling the principle of separation of church and state, lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union contend. In a federal suit filed yesterday against the Downingtown schools, ACLU lawyers said permitting Christian clergy to pray at school events is unconstitutional and could make non-Christians "feel like second class citizens. " ACLU legal director Stefan Presser, in a hearing in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, initially sought to block a minister from praying or preaching at tonight's commencement exercises for Downingtown Area High School in Chester County.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | Associated Press
DENVER - A civil-liberties group plans to provide free representation to a 35-year-old Colorado man who faces criminal prosecution and a jail sentence for giving the finger to a Colorado State Patrol trooper. The American Civil Liberties Union says the gesture may be rude, but it is protected free speech. The ACLU says Shane Boor was driving to work in April when he saw a state trooper pull over a car. As Boor passed by, he extended his middle finger in the trooper's direction.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | By Claude Lewis
I tremble at the thought of what America would be like without the existence of the American Civil Liberties Union. Since 1920 when it was founded, the ACLU has been one of the foremost agencies in the battle to keep the flame of freedom alive. As citizens of the freest nation in history, we owe a measure of our liberty to this organization that has existed in controversy all the years it has fought to expand the rights of individual Americans. Despite the fact that the Bill of Rights was adopted almost 130 years before the founding of the ACLU, the rights of Americans were routinely denied both by government officials and political demagogues.
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine a work world where bosses search their employees' desks at will. Now, imagine being a kid and dealing with things like that regularly in school. Children's rights can be dramatically different. Schools can have some control over their students' clothing, behavior, writings, e-mail, locker content and under some circumstances, can even monitor their blood for drugs. The shootings in Littleton, Colo., in April intensified many of these regulations and even spurred new ones.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
An official of the American Civil Liberties Union said yesterday it appeared that the district attorney's office was handling prosecution of the Sean Daily and Stephen Crespo murder cases differently because one victim was white and the other Puerto Rican. In a letter to District Attorney Ronald D. Castille, Stefan Presser, legal director of the Philadelphia chapter of the ACLU, called on Castille to "re- examine both the charges and bail of the defendants in the Daily case. " In a letter of response, Castille denied any partiality and said, "The charges and the bail in these two cases accurately reflect individual culpability and nothing more.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | by David E. Bernstein
The American Civil Liberties Union's name is becoming a paradox, as the organization's commitment to a robust defense of civil liberties against the government continues to diminish. Take the issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court of whether the Boy Scouts of America have a First Amendment freedom-of-association right to exclude homosexuals. Instead of defending the Boy Scouts' right of association, the ACLU has filed a brief arguing that the government can and should compel the Boy Scouts to accept gays as Scout leaders and members.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
TRENTON - You've seen it on prime-time police dramas. Officers bust a drug-using high school student or low-level street dealer, then "flip" him - promising lighter prosecution in exchange for help in catching the "big fish. " But a three-year investigation, results of which were released Monday by the New Jersey chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, found disjointed, confusing, and, in some cases, nonexistent policies on how law enforcement agencies in the state use confidential informants.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The recent repeal of a juvenile curfew in a North Jersey town has renewed questions about the constitutionality of such measures, prompting some local officials to review their laws. The widespread effects were clear Tuesday night, when Paulsboro's borough council approved rescinding its curfew, a measure in place since 1983. The decision to ax the law has brought at least a temporary end to nights when a siren's wail at 10 p.m. signaled those under 18 should be home. "It's going to be a problem," Police Chief Chris Wachter said Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2011 memo from Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey hasn't stopped Philadelphia police officers from intimidating and arresting people who try to record them, the ACLU says. So the organization is hoping a little dose of public shaming will. It launched a social-media campaign Thursday urging city residents to tweet their stories of police harassment for recording law enforcement activity with the hashtag #PACopWatch. The group's efforts coincided with the filing of the organization's fourth federal lawsuit on behalf of a city resident arrested on what it described as questionable grounds.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Dora Sander was among those who managed to slip away from the Third Reich after the November 1938 Kristallnacht destruction of storefronts and houses of worship showed its hatred of Jews even more publicly. In 1936, when she was 17, her parents in Stuttgart sent her to relatives in London, where she worked to perfect her English and where she became a tutor to two daughters of a widowed member of Parliament. She passed an English university entrance exam in May 1938, conferred with her family on a visit to Stuttgart, and returned to London.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey has sent letters to 136 school districts telling them to stop requiring photo identification from adults registering children for school or risk a possible lawsuit. "This requirement violates constitutional law, state law, and state regulations," wrote Alexander Shalom, ACLU senior staff attorney, in the April 1 letter. "The requirement discriminates against immigrant parents, preventing or discouraging them from registering their children to attend public school.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON An Egg Harbor City man who insisted on keeping his hat on in court has found himself at the center of a legal skirmish some hope will provide a compelling reminder that judges must adequately accommodate the poor. But the American Civil Liberties Union filing that could prompt such a message has little to do with Matthew Graham's black headpiece. The organization's New Jersey chapter submitted a brief this week to a state appellate court, arguing that a judge erred in denying certain fee waivers that would permit Graham to appeal a contempt-of-court conviction.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THIS ISN'T YOUR AVERAGE New Year's resolution. Come Jan. 1, the Philadelphia Police Department will implement a sweeping new interview policy that's aimed at protecting the rights of people who are questioned by detectives - and eliminating instances of investigators being accused of coercing confessions from suspects. A separate initiative, to be rolled out at a later date, will require interrogations in the Homicide Unit to be video-recorded - years after the practice became common in police departments across the country.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
NO ONE GOT PUNCHED in the face - this time - but YouTube has given the Philadelphia Police Department another black eye, proving once again that smartphones are a bully cop's worst nightmare. Let's just hope that Officer Philip Nace doesn't land in the city's tourism department when the dust settles. "Don't come to f---ing Philadelphia. Stay in Jersey. " That's one of Nace's rage-induced zingers that were recorded in a disturbing 16-minute YouTube video of a recent stop and frisk.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
TO PARAPHRASE Shakespeare, uneasy lies the bouffant that wears the tiara. Who would have thought, in the joyful anticipation of the pageant's return to Atlantic City, that the coronation of the new Miss America would be fraught with controversy. Yes, one contestant had tattoos and combat boots, but she was also hot, blond and the favorite among "real, 100 percent Americans. " Which, come to think of it, was part of the controversy. As we all now know, Nina Davuluri was crowned queen Sunday evening, prompting jubilation among some and revulsion among others.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer glazerj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5915
THE AMERICAN Civil Liberties Union yesterday filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of 10 couples and three other people challenging Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, is the first federal case on the issue since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act last month, an attorney in the case said. Pennsylvania is the only state in the Northeast without either a freedom-of-marriage right or a civil-union statute, said the lawyer, Mark Aronchick, who called yesterday's announcement "a major moment of history.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Ivan Moreno, Associated Press
DENVER - Two men are pursuing a discrimination complaint against a Colorado bakery, saying the business refused them a wedding cake to honor their Massachusetts ceremony, and alleging that the owners have a history of turning away same-sex couples. As more states move to legalize same-sex marriage and civil unions, the case highlights a growing tension between gay-rights advocates and supporters of religious freedom. "Religious freedom is a fundamental right in America, and it's something that we champion at the ACLU," said Mark Silverstein, the legal director of the group in Colorado, which filed the complaint on behalf of the couple.
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