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Acoustic Music

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's true. John Scofield, long known for his intense brand of electric-guitar playing, turned to a nylon-stringed classical guitar for his latest album, appropriately titled Quiet, released on the Verve label a few weeks ago. But don't get the idea that Scofield is about to abandon the electric instrument. "Oh, no, I'm playing both acoustic and electric on this tour, but I still consider myself basically an electric guitarist," Scofield said prior to an appearance Sunday night at the Blue Moon Jazz Cafe and Restaurant.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
If you weren't convinced that MTV's "Unplugged" takes itself just a bit too seriously, maybe the upcoming release of the series' companion coffee- table opus - a 184-page, hardback look at the show which has revived acoustic music - will persuade you. Plop down $50 and you get - yawn - set lists, taping dates, band lineups and plenty of big photos. Or you could goout and buy three or four CDs and, like, listen to music.
SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S a lot of buzz (not all favorable) over high-res sound, trumpeting new music-delivery services and devices that offer a sharper, crisper, you-are-there listening experience. Credit the explosion in sales of high-end headphones and the boom in acoustic music - both trends are tuning listeners in to the joys of "real" music. It's what they've been missing in the age of $10 ear buds and highly compressed MP3 files. Improvements in music coding, Internet connectivity and storage are also pushing the high-res cause, kicking yesteryear's steely sounding, low-res MP3 files to the gutter.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Folk musicians Lee Jones and Kolleen Bowers are hoping to open the eyes and ears of listeners this Sunday afternoon. They have organized a free, open-house concert featuring eight acts at the Twentieth Century Club in Lansdowne. "We hope to get the community involved with folk, acoustic and blues music," Jones said. "Plus January is national folk music and dance month. " The concert is being sponsored by two local music clubs - the Lansdowne Folk Club and the Metronome Coffeehouse.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's longest-running rock 'n' roll party is finally calling it quits. J.C. Dobbs, the South Street landmark where George Thorogood, Nirvana, Green Day, Smashing Pumpkins and Pearl Jam got their local start, will close in late April. The spot will be reborn under new management as the Pontiac Bar and Grill, where acoustic music will be the side dish, not the main event. Dobbs owner Kathy James said: "I don't think the '90s have been what the '80s were. There are neighborhoods like Manayunk and 2nd Street that are hotter.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
After a business year that was virtually wiped out by a fire that damaged its concert site, the Perimeter II Coffee House is back and anticipating a full season of Friday night acoustic music concerts in 1989. The organization is once again holding shows in the Jaycees Community Hall at 143 E. Ormond Ave. in Oaklyn. The Coffee House, which will celebrate its 23d anniversary on May 5, was founded by a group of students at Rutgers University-Camden, where the organization was located through 1980, said Anne Deeney, the manager of the Perimeter II. In 1981, the Coffee House moved its concert site to an old railroad station in West Collingswood, but renovations to the building forced it from there and into the Jaycees Community Hall in fall 1987, Deeney said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011
_ George Washington - yeah, the man who commanded the Continental Army and served as our first president - also knew his way around a still and a mash tun. He owned one of the largest, most successful commercial distilling operations of his day and brewed his own beer during the Revolutionary War. Salute this lesser-known but side to the Father of Our Country at General George's Beer Garden on the outdoor terrace at the National Constitution Center...
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
From the night it first opened in 1964 at 874 W. Lancaster Ave. in Bryn Mawr, the Main Point coffeehouse was the right club in the right place at the right time. Riding the crest of the acoustic music boom, the club gave folks of all ages a pleasant place to hang out together, and introduced them to a zillion great young talents - Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen . . . Thirty-four years later, a new Bryn Mawr establishment just two doors away (880 W. Lancaster)
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The coffee aroma wafted up the stairwell to the second floor of the Twentieth Century Club. Music fans milled into the smoke-free hall and into a dimly lighted, bookshelf-lined living room. The mood was right for listening to acoustic tunes. It's just not a city thing anymore. Coffeehouses are popping up all over the suburbs featuring music of the unplugged variety. "I wanted to open a comfortable place to listen to this kind, or any kind of acoustic music," said Lee Jones, founder of the Lansdowne Folk Club.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
It's just not possible to judge the Artist Formerly Known as Prince by the same standards used to judge other recording artists. After all, how many musicians can boast of releasing seven CDs in two years? It's well known by now that Prince has a cache of hundreds of unreleased tracks, many of which show up regularly on bootlegs and are speculated about on his numerous Web sites. "Crystal Ball," the Artist's new release on his own NPG Records, is four CDs of unreleased music (though P. Control from "Emancipation" is repeated here, as well as alternate versions of "So Dark," a remix of "Love Sign," and "Tell Me How You Want to Be Done")
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SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S a lot of buzz (not all favorable) over high-res sound, trumpeting new music-delivery services and devices that offer a sharper, crisper, you-are-there listening experience. Credit the explosion in sales of high-end headphones and the boom in acoustic music - both trends are tuning listeners in to the joys of "real" music. It's what they've been missing in the age of $10 ear buds and highly compressed MP3 files. Improvements in music coding, Internet connectivity and storage are also pushing the high-res cause, kicking yesteryear's steely sounding, low-res MP3 files to the gutter.
NEWS
August 22, 2012
A teacher, a retiree, and two lawyers who call themselves the Jersey Peaches swing into a version of "Summertime" as steamy as the weather. A singer-songwriter/recovering addict/unemployed mason from Mount Ephraim is on deck with his guitar. So is a communications professional and blues guy called 3 Cat Clem; he'll jam with a tattooed preacher who blows a heavenly harmonica. Welcome to Wide Open Mic night at the Barrington Coffee House, where strum and twang is on the menu every Thursday.
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Over sushi, Drew Podolski and Steve Kessler cooked up a concept. The young lawyers imagined a place where they could share the sort of music that plays second fiddle in the highly amplified soundtrack of popular culture. Their 2009 lunch helped launch the South Jersey Acoustic Roots Music Society, whose unplugged gatherings at the Medford Arts Center are connecting a community and making a joyful noise. "Roots music historically has been passed on through social gatherings," says Podolski, 34, a guitarist from Medford who practices law in Princeton.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011
_ George Washington - yeah, the man who commanded the Continental Army and served as our first president - also knew his way around a still and a mash tun. He owned one of the largest, most successful commercial distilling operations of his day and brewed his own beer during the Revolutionary War. Salute this lesser-known but side to the Father of Our Country at General George's Beer Garden on the outdoor terrace at the National Constitution Center...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | staff
Live music and more, tonight through Thursday, compiled by Shaun Brady, Tom Di Nardo, James Johnson, Sara Sherr and Jonathan Takiff. POP . . . plus Mike Pinto: Riding the mellow reggae/rock waves to town, Pinto holds appeal to the same crew that likes to groove at the beach with Jack Johnson, G. Love and Keller Williams. Life in the Way, Jesse Teich and Don McClosky also gather round the campfire. World Café Live, 3025 Walnut St., 8 tonight, $16, 215-222-1400, www.worldcafelive.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
From the night it first opened in 1964 at 874 W. Lancaster Ave. in Bryn Mawr, the Main Point coffeehouse was the right club in the right place at the right time. Riding the crest of the acoustic music boom, the club gave folks of all ages a pleasant place to hang out together, and introduced them to a zillion great young talents - Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen . . . Thirty-four years later, a new Bryn Mawr establishment just two doors away (880 W. Lancaster)
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
It's just not possible to judge the Artist Formerly Known as Prince by the same standards used to judge other recording artists. After all, how many musicians can boast of releasing seven CDs in two years? It's well known by now that Prince has a cache of hundreds of unreleased tracks, many of which show up regularly on bootlegs and are speculated about on his numerous Web sites. "Crystal Ball," the Artist's new release on his own NPG Records, is four CDs of unreleased music (though P. Control from "Emancipation" is repeated here, as well as alternate versions of "So Dark," a remix of "Love Sign," and "Tell Me How You Want to Be Done")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last cut on the Rippingtons' latest record is an acoustic working-over of the record's title cut, "Black Diamond. " It's an interesting choice for a group that is among the top "smooth jazz" bands around, and one that prides itself on using the latest in musical technology, such as the electronic wind instrument. So, Russ Freeman, why'd you do it, and what took you so long? "We weren't even going to put that track on the record," Freeman, the group's founder and leader, said from a tour stop in Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Osby doesn't sing, at least not in public. But he is very attuned to the properties and possibilities of the human voice. "I've always been interested in using the voice as one of the fundamental integers of my performances and recordings," he said. Osby, the saxophonist who performs tonight at the Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts, has one of the more experimental lineups in the festival. He will present an acoustic group, but one with an array of vocal sounds.
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