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Acquittal

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NEWS
July 20, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Twenty-five West Philadelphia community members attended each of the three days of Derrick Winston's murder trial as a show of support. They were convinced he was being framed. All were pleased with the result. They applauded a not-guilty verdict by a jury yesterday. Defense lawyer Todd E. Henry said Winston, 26, of Market Street near 58th, had been falsely accused of fatally shooting George Maddox, 25, on Jan. 4, 1999. The allegation was made by Marcus Henderson, who failed to show up for the trial.
NEWS
September 9, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A German shepherd dog belonging to a 15-year-old victim of a stabbing and robbery yesterday played a major role in the acquittal of Melvin Spearman. "My client would have been absolutely nuts to go into a home that he knew contained a German shepherd," argued defense attorney Barry Denker. Spearman, 20, of Merrick Street near Ridge Avenue, had been identified as the attacker by Joan Beounittis, of Ridge Avenue near Scott's Lane. The victim said her dog remained quiet on the second floor of her home while she was being assaulted on the first floor July 8, 1985.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By Sergio R. Bustos and Richard A. Oppel Jr., Special to The Inquirer
A Chester County jury found a 24-year-old West Chester man not guilty yesterday of shooting six people outside the Coatesville Elks Lodge in May 1990. The jury deliberated less than an hour before finding Duan Seay, of the 200 block of South Matlack Street, not guilty of 26 counts of attempted criminal homicide, aggravated assault, reckless endangering and weapons offenses. Seay's family and friends reacted with tears of joy and they hugged each other as Common Pleas Court Judge J. Curtis Joyner announced the verdict.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Charles Bagley put his murder acquittal on public view yesterday, speaking out for the first time since he was accused of wife-killing four years ago. He says he had an idyllic marriage, never slept with other women, never smacked his wife. And of course, never killed Yvonne Bagley in their Main Line hot tub and won't get a penny of the life insurance money. The system worked, he told Wally Kennedy on "AM/Philadelphia," on WPVI-TV (Channel 6), yesterday morning. With Neil Jokelson, the lawyer who helped detach him from Delaware County's legal maw, Bagley answered questions haltingly, showing only glimpses of the wide grin that often creased his face during his 16 days on trial in Media.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Everybody in court was stunned by the jury decision that acquitted a man of strangling and stabbing a woman in 1995. Even the defendant, who had confessed. Court observers said the jury simply swept aside the evidence against Ian Wood, 26, a handyman, to acquit him of killing a 57-year-old Oak Lane woman in her apartment on Feb. 2, 1995. Wood, 26, seemed shocked at his acquittal for a crime police say he readily admitted. Defense lawyer Donald Padova gasped. Assistant District Attorney Yvonne Ruiz, who had produced other evidence linking Wood to the crime, couldn't believe it. Wood, who did not testify, had allegedly told police that "voices" directed him to kill Bernine McFadden after breaking into her second-floor apartment on 67th Avenue near 5th Street on Feb. 2, 1995.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The cop was no crook, said the jury. After Andrea Collins was acquitted last night, she broke down in tears, hugged her lawyer, Brian J. McMonagle, and got down on her knees and thanked God. "I am numb," said Collins, 34, who says she would "love" to return to the police department, from which she was fired after her arrest. "I know I didn't do anything wrong," said Collins, a veteran of seven years before she was charged with taking part in a robbery at a sportswear store on 52nd Street near Sansom that netted $29 on Nov. 28, 1994.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia veterinarian was acquitted yesterday of kicking and beating a 9-year-old Doberman to death in his animal hospital last year. Municipal Judge Lydia Y. Kirkland ruled in favor of Dr. Jordan Miller, 55, who claimed the "overweight and anemic" dog, Nera, died from an unknown cause in his facility on July 15, a few hours after biting his sneaker. The verdict drew protests from the dog's owners, Florence and Gus Peraino. She said she planned to continue picketing at Miller's Bainbridge Animal Hospital, 7th and Bainbridge streets, in hopes the state will revoke the vet's license.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
One day after being indicted in federal court on a case-fixing charge, attorney Thomas L. McGill Jr. went into a Common Pleas Courtroom yesterday and won an acquittal for a client accused of murder. "I want to show everyone that I'm still practicing," said McGill, who insisted that the indictment will not slow down his legal practice. "I'm glad to have the opportunity to finally respond to the charges," he said. "This investigation has been deliberately, and in a calculated fashion, leaked to the press for the last two or three years.
SPORTS
January 16, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Soon-to-be-reinstated NBA referee Steve Javie yesterday attributed his acquittal on tax fraud charges to "the power of prayer. " His defense attorney, Gregory T. Magarity, contends Javie never should have been prosecuted on criminal charges in the first place. Whatever the case, a U.S. District Court jury in Philadelphia yesterday rejected Internal Revenue Servie claims that Javie intentionally avoided paying about $24,000 in taxes on more than $70,000 in hidden income over a three-year period.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By PAUL MARYNIAK, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Joanne Sills contributed to this story.)
There was never a question that Common Pleas Court reporter Loretta Massey carried a box of marijuana and hashish through U.S. Customs at Greater Philadelphia International Airport last year. There was doubt only over whether she knew what she was doing. But a federal grand jury indictment yesterday charged that Common Pleas Judge Kenneth S. Harris - in apparently taped conversations - suggested that a fix, not a doubt, would be behind her acquittal on drug charges by Municipal Judge Ronald A. Merriweather.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Representing himself at the federal racketeering trial that could have sent him to prison for the rest of his life, criminal defense lawyer Donald F. Manno carried a likeness of St. Rita in his shirt pocket every day. He'd had the holy card for years; Rita is his wife's name, and the couple had long been fond of the South Philly parish named for the saint. But Manno came to rely upon his renewed Catholic faith almost as much as he depended on his family during the arduous, six-month proceeding in U.S. District Court in Camden.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an rare ruling from the bench, a Philadelphia judge on Tuesday acquitted an East Mount Airy man of vehicular homicide and involuntary manslaughter in a car-bike crash that killed an off-duty police officer who was his romantic rival. Common Pleas Court Judge Lillian H. Ransom's acquittal of Kareem Alleyne in the July 15, 2012, death of 35-year-old Marc Brady came after three days of testimony and moments after the prosecution case ended. Alleyne, 36, a tall, thin man dressed in a business suit, bent over to embrace his defense attorney, James Funt.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
A story Tuesday about social media reaction to the Michael Dunn murder trial in Florida misstated the trial's outcome. He was convicted on three counts of attempted second-degree murder. Also, a hung jury does not constitute acquittal.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
I'M REMINDED of Vince Lombardi's quote, "Leaders are made, they are not born," when I think of how a local entrepreneur was drafted into leading Sunday's protest in Center City against George Zimmerman's acquittal. Chris Norris, 26, had no intention of doing anything. After hearing the heart-wrenching news that Zimmerman had been found not guilty of second-degree murder for shooting unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin, he took himself off the grid. Norris turned off his phone.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
It would be a shame if the unnecessary death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin produced more paydays for the man who fatally shot the unarmed black teenager in the heart during a scuffle. But George Zimmerman, the Sanford, Fla., neighborhood watch captain who has already received hundreds of thousands of dollars from gun-rights advocates and other supporters, is likely to be offered millions through lucrative book and movie deals. Zimmerman, 29, was acquitted of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges late Saturday night by a sequestered jury that had deliberated about 16 hours over two days.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
JOHN "BIG RED" Huttick lost his left eye in a bar fight in Burholme, then endured a mistrial when his fake eye popped out on the witness stand during his attacker's trial last month. On Wednesday, Huttick dealt with more bad news when a Philadelphia jury found Matthew Brunelli not guilty of aggravated assault in the August 2011 fight in the parking lot of the New Princeton Tavern on Rising Sun Avenue. The verdict came after a five-day trial during which the prosecution alleged that Brunelli, 23, stabbed Huttick, 48, in the eye, and the defense alleged that Brunelli punched Huttick in self-defense after being attacked by him and two other men. The fight erupted after Brunelli and his girlfriend were followed out of the bar by two of Huttick's friends, including off-duty Philadelphia police officer Brian Clerkin, said defense attorney Eileen Hurley.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia group is demanding a federal investigation into the acquittal of the former police officer accused of assaulting a woman who attended last year's Puerto Rican Day Parade. The Philadelphia chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women said Tuesday that it intended to deliver letters calling on the U.S. Department of Justice to open a criminal civil rights investigation of the Sept. 30 incident, which was captured on video and went viral on the Internet. Last week, Municipal Court Judge Patrick F. Dugan acquitted Jonathan Josey, a former lieutenant, of simple assault for hitting Aida Guzman, 40, of Chester, at Fifth Street and Lehigh Avenue.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia group is demanding a federal investigation into the acquittal of the former police officer accused of assaulting a woman who attended last year's Puerto Rican Day Parade. The Philadelphia chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women said Tuesday that it intended to deliver letters calling on the U.S. Department of Justice to open a criminal civil rights investigation of the Sept. 30 incident, which was captured on video and went viral on the Internet.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Protesters outside City Hall on Friday said they were outraged that Municipal Court Judge Patrick Dugan, who acquitted former police Officer Jonathan Josey of assaulting a woman attending the Puerto Rican Day Parade, was married to a police officer. "Married to a Cop / Endorsed by FOP / How 'Impartial' / Can Dugan Be," read one sign at the noon rally, attended by about 40 people. Dugan is married to Officer Nancy Farrell Dugan. He was endorsed for election by the Fraternal Order of Police.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Nataliya Vasilyeva, Associated Press
MOSCOW - The only official charged with the death of a Russian whistle-blowing lawyer walked free on Friday after a Moscow court acquitted him of negligence, in a case that has become a rallying point for human-rights advocates and sparked escalating legislation in the United States and Russia. Sergei Magnitsky died in jail in 2009 after his pancreatitis went untreated, and an investigation by Russia's presidential council on human rights concluded he was severely beaten and denied medical treatment.
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