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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - The bulk of a man's childhood comic-book collection, including many of the most prized issues ever published, sold at auction Wednesday for about $3.5 million. A copy of Detective Comics No. 27, which sold for 10 cents in 1939 and features the debut of Batman, got the top bid at the New York City auction. It sold for about $523,000 with a buyer's premium, said Lon Allen, managing director of comics for Heritage Auctions, the Dallas-based auction house overseeing the sale.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
You may not know Jerome Siegel, but you know his work. In 1933, Siegel and his high school buddy Joseph Shuster created Superman. In his first incarnation, Superman was a bald-headed, Depression-era villain bent on world domination. But Siegel and Shuster tinkered with the character until Supes became the hero we know and love: He came from an alien planet, had great strength and speed, was impervious to bullets, could leap a building in a single bound, and was known to the outside world as mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | Daily News wire services
CASTAIC, Calif. Record-seeking glider lands directly in jail A para-glider looking to get into the record books instead landed in prison. Thomas Truax lost altitude and aborted his attempt Friday to break a 125-mile distance record for the non-motorized, parachute-like glider. He touched down safely on a prison field only to find himself surrounded by 15 deputies who feared a jail break. "It makes a good story: 'Pilot lands in jail or whatever,' " said Truax, 42, of Carpenteria.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
JOY-RIDING POOCH HITS GAS PUMP, SETS OFF BLAZE When Precious' owner left the cocker spaniel in his idling car one recent afternoon, he forgot to say one very important word: stay. While the owner dashed into the Mountaintop Grocery in Egypt, Ala., for milk, Precious knocked the Volvo into reverse. The car rolled into a gasoline pump, which was knocked over and burst into flames. "Tell everyone the dog did it," said Precious' owner, speaking with the Gadsden Times on condition of anonymity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
When it was announced that DC superstar writer Geoff Johns and "Superman: The Movie" director Richard Donner were teaming up to write the Man of Steel's comic book adventures, most fans were giddy with glee. For good reason, as it turns out. Johns and Donner have proven to be a Super-team that has put the action back in "Action Comics. " They display their talent and strong vision for Superman by focusing on his status as the "Last Son of Krypton," which could be lethal to readers in the hands of lesser writers.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
The eighth edition of R.S. Yeoman's Current Coins of the World has been released in paperback. The book has been out of print for a decade, since Yeoman's retirement, and the new edition is the work of Ira and Arthur Friedburg. This 368-page book lists the coins of 220 countries by type rather than date and mint mark. The prices for coins struck since 1964 are listed for proof and uncirculated grades. Most coins are illustrated photographically, and each is described by type of metal and fineness of precious metal coins.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A despondent Jimmy Olsen was there. So was Lois Lane, as well as the Daily Planet's Perry White, who seemed a bit less curmudgeonly on this somber occasion. Even the Flash and the Green Lantern showed up to pay their final respects. They, and roughly other 100 comic book fans, gathered at Claude's Comics in Hatboro to mourn Superman's untimely demise and to lay the Man of Steel's 54- year-old body to rest. "We'll all miss the big blue schoolboy," said Bruce Rowe, 31, a machinist who spent an hour caking on pasty white makeup to transform himself into the Joker - one of the pallbearers for the memorial service.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
Col. Dan Alleva will be selling the contents of a local flower shop tomorrow, including all types of vases in china, glass, pottery, wood and more, brass and tin ware items, baskets, topiaries, urns. Also being sold is a large selection of prints and framed artwork, including works by Chester County artist Dane Tilghman, and many unframed color plates by internationally acclaimed wildflower and naturalist watercolor artist Maryrose Wampler of Bloomington, Ind. You'll find photography, both black and white and color, up for bid, with subjects ranging from Princess Grace Kelly and family, President Truman, President and Mrs. Eisenhower, President Kennedy with Bishop Sheen, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Pete Rose and others.
LIVING
July 1, 1996 | The Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the Miami Herald and Reuters contributed to this report
Yeah, yeah, your father had one and his mother threw it away. Now Steve Geppi, 46, has his second copy, but it didn't come cheap. On Saturday, Geppi, owner of a major comic book company, spent $61,900 for a copy of the 1938 comic in which Superman first leaped tall buildings in a single bound. He outbid two other collectors at Sotheby's sixth annual sale of comic books and comic art to win the rare Action Comics No. 1. The cover shows the Man of Steel hoisting a car above his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
With " Superman " No. 700 marking a rare milestone - only "Action Comics," "Detective Comics" and " Batman " have been continuously published for that many issues - you would think the issue would be jam-packed with epic slug fests, classic villains, etc. However, since the past few years have seen the Man of Steel engaged in universe-shattering battles on an almost continuous basis, DC has chosen to take the special occasion to look at...
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - The bulk of a man's childhood comic-book collection, including many of the most prized issues ever published, sold at auction Wednesday for about $3.5 million. A copy of Detective Comics No. 27, which sold for 10 cents in 1939 and features the debut of Batman, got the top bid at the New York City auction. It sold for about $523,000 with a buyer's premium, said Lon Allen, managing director of comics for Heritage Auctions, the Dallas-based auction house overseeing the sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
With " Superman " No. 700 marking a rare milestone - only "Action Comics," "Detective Comics" and " Batman " have been continuously published for that many issues - you would think the issue would be jam-packed with epic slug fests, classic villains, etc. However, since the past few years have seen the Man of Steel engaged in universe-shattering battles on an almost continuous basis, DC has chosen to take the special occasion to look at...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
When it was first announced that Archie Andrews was putting an end to the most famous and enduring love triangle in comics by choosing to propose to sexy, savvy and rich Veronica instead of girl-next-door Betty, the shock waves were larger than even Archie Comics anticipated. Why? Because even without a movie featuring the gang from Riverdale, Archie's name recognition and the affection readers have for him are broader and deeper than most comic fans realize. First, it is important to remember that Archie, in terms of consistent popularity and readership, ranks only behind Superman and Batman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
If you have been resistant to trying a Zenescope book - or any independent title, for that matter - a new series may be the "Straw" you need to stir that drink. "The Straw Men" stands out from the company's other excellent dark and edgy offerings. It may be the most chilling book being published today. What makes it truly horrifying, what makes you want to grab onto something with a death grip to rival the hold a character has on his steering wheel in one tense scene, is that all the book's characters, storylines and scenes are drenched with reality.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
You may not know Jerome Siegel, but you know his work. In 1933, Siegel and his high school buddy Joseph Shuster created Superman. In his first incarnation, Superman was a bald-headed, Depression-era villain bent on world domination. But Siegel and Shuster tinkered with the character until Supes became the hero we know and love: He came from an alien planet, had great strength and speed, was impervious to bullets, could leap a building in a single bound, and was known to the outside world as mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
When it was announced that DC superstar writer Geoff Johns and "Superman: The Movie" director Richard Donner were teaming up to write the Man of Steel's comic book adventures, most fans were giddy with glee. For good reason, as it turns out. Johns and Donner have proven to be a Super-team that has put the action back in "Action Comics. " They display their talent and strong vision for Superman by focusing on his status as the "Last Son of Krypton," which could be lethal to readers in the hands of lesser writers.
NEWS
June 27, 2003 | By Crispin Sartwell
The Hulk managed to break all records for June movie openings, doing some $62 million of business on its first weekend. And in general, at least on screen, it's been quite the period for Marvel comics: Spiderman, Daredevil and the X-Men, as well as the Hulk. The classic rivalry in superhero comics has been between the companies Marvel and DC Comics. DC got its start in the '30s and has been known above all for Superman and Batman, though its stable also includes such crusaders for righteousness as Wonder Woman, Hawkman and the Green Lantern.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
Col. Dan Alleva will be selling the contents of a local flower shop tomorrow, including all types of vases in china, glass, pottery, wood and more, brass and tin ware items, baskets, topiaries, urns. Also being sold is a large selection of prints and framed artwork, including works by Chester County artist Dane Tilghman, and many unframed color plates by internationally acclaimed wildflower and naturalist watercolor artist Maryrose Wampler of Bloomington, Ind. You'll find photography, both black and white and color, up for bid, with subjects ranging from Princess Grace Kelly and family, President Truman, President and Mrs. Eisenhower, President Kennedy with Bishop Sheen, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Pete Rose and others.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not unusual for Bruce Springsteen to begin a concert tour at home. But this time, home also is in a region recovering from a terrorist attack that has transformed his art. Springsteen's album The Rising, inspired by the Sept. 11 attacks, is the fastest-selling disc of his career, selling 526,000 copies since its release July 30. The singer's 46-city concert tour began last night in his home state, at the Continental Airlines Arena in East Rutherford, N.J. Many of the 2,823 victims of the attack on the World Trade Center were from New Jersey, including more than 150 from Monmouth County, where Springsteen owns a farm.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | Daily News wire services
CASTAIC, Calif. Record-seeking glider lands directly in jail A para-glider looking to get into the record books instead landed in prison. Thomas Truax lost altitude and aborted his attempt Friday to break a 125-mile distance record for the non-motorized, parachute-like glider. He touched down safely on a prison field only to find himself surrounded by 15 deputies who feared a jail break. "It makes a good story: 'Pilot lands in jail or whatever,' " said Truax, 42, of Carpenteria.
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